I am moving and need to quit my job!

  1. Hey everyone!

    I am currently an RN in California at a University hospital in the NICU. I've only been working for about 1 year (in June) and I love it so much and am so sad that I have to leave. I was first hired in their NICU New Grad Residency Program. I feel like they taught me everything I know and I will be forever thankful for that. It really is my dream job. My fianc is a med student and just got matched for residency on the east coast. So we will be moving right after our wedding and honeymoon in early June for a minimum of 6 years

    My question is..

    How do I quit my job?? I think I am going to give them about 1 month notice. Do you think this is good enough? Also do I bring a letter with me or send it before?
    I have a supervisor and 2 managers. What is the best way to let them know?

    Any advice is greatly appreciated!

    Thanks so much!

    Rachel
    Last edit by Rachey467 on Mar 31, '14
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    About Rachey467

    Joined: Jul '10; Posts: 10

    14 Comments

  3. by   VANurse2010
    If you're punching a clock, all you owe them is 2 weeks.

    Just write them a short, matter-of-fact letter informing them that you're leaving. Thank you for the opportunity, my last day is _____. Don't embellish, explain, etc. Short and simple
  4. by   Lev <3
    I think you should start looking for a job now. Which state are you looking at? You have enough experience (1 year) that you are no longer considered a new grad. I think the sooner you inform your manager the better. Speak with the manager/supervisor you interviewed with about leaving. They should not hold it against you. As you said, you love working there and you have a legitimate reason to leave. They will understand. I think the earlier the better because they can be references for you when you apply to new positions. I think the standard procedure is speak with the manager and then write up a formal resignation letter.
  5. by   schnookimz
    Eh I think you can tell them as much as you want. You're leaving on good terms for a good reason.

    I would just speak with your managers privately and then give them the letter. They usually need the letter as a formality, but I think it's best to tell them in person

    Good luck!
  6. by   nurseprnRN
    I would also ask your managers and clinical specialists for a letter of introduction to any of their peers in the area where you will be moving. Chances are very good that they know people there, and every little bit helps! Good luck!
  7. by   Karendc
    I suggest that you give at least 30 days in advance notice so that they can also prepare and look for a replacement. Also, talk to your RN Supervisors/manager ( at least 2) and ask if you can make them as your clinical reference. You will need that when you seek another employment.
  8. by   ArtClassRN
    Quote from VANurse2010
    If you're punching a clock, all you owe them is 2 weeks.
    Careful with that advice. Specific employers or unions may have rules/agreements that require more (like a month) or undergo penalties of some kind.
  9. by   RNsRWe
    Quote from ArtClassRN
    Careful with that advice. Specific employers or unions may have rules/agreements that require more (like a month) or undergo penalties of some kind.

    Exactly. Was going to comment that myself. I had an employer whose policy it was to refuse paying unused vacation time if not enough notice had been given (and for RNs, that was anywhere from 3-5 weeks). And if they could find ways to dock it, they did that too.

    Beyond that, it is common in professional nursing circles to give the same amount of notice as you have in vacation time. Not completely sure I understand the correlation, but the concept of giving 3 weeks' notice if you are someone who earns 3 weeks of vacation time is simple enough.

    Four weeks is not uncommon for an RN in a position that is not easily replaced.

    If you have a good rapport with supervisors, asking for letters of recommendation in person is always a good idea
  10. by   VANurse2010
    I gave 2 weeks at my last job and was paid all my owed time - which was more than 2 weeks.
  11. by   RNsRWe
    Quote from VANurse2010
    I gave 2 weeks at my last job and was paid all my owed time - which was more than 2 weeks.
    And that's great that it worked out that way for you. But many times....it doesn't. I wouldn't advise someone to only give 2 weeks' notice without reading the fine print on their HR policy (or contract of hire, or union contract).
  12. by   alrighThen
    I gave two weeks at my last job and was put on the do not rehire list. Apparently I should have given 3. Good thing hell will freeze before I consider going back. Exciting times! Where on the east coast will you be?
  13. by   NicuGal
    Where I work, it is the number of weeks vacation you receive which is used as a guideline for quitting. Sometimes there are circumstances that require less time than that, but most places have an unwritten "rule".
  14. by   redhead_NURSE98!
    Quote from VANurse2010
    I gave 2 weeks at my last job and was paid all my owed time - which was more than 2 weeks.
    I don't know what else anyone could say to make you understand that this varies by the job. It's usually in the employee handbook.

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