Doctors vs NP's?

  1. I hate to say this but I no longer like to see the NP when I go in for a doctors visit. I have noticed that doctors are much more secure with decisions and aren't so scared to prescribe something. I have been on testosterone for several years through my family practice doctors. However, as I recently moved, I was set up to see a NP. Well instead of handling the low T issue herself she had to refer me to an endocrinologist? WTH? Over time I have noticed NP's like to pawn you off to anyone else for your matters if they can. She wanted to write a script for a psyche med though. Doesn't this require a psychiatrist if she wants to be technical? If NP's are expected to be a growing profession then this is gonna suck. GROW SOME!
  2. Visit FrankRN2017 profile page

    About FrankRN2017

    Joined: Dec '17; Posts: 36; Likes: 34

    97 Comments

  3. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Many won't like this, but I believe we can thank direct-entry programs, in part, for any discrimination against NPs in general. I have seen standards lowered significantly in my tenure as an RN and a patient. Now I chose an MD for my primary care, only. In the "old days" when I was military the NPs were top-notch and had years of nursing first before going on to advanced practice.

    I will not be convinced a person with a degree unrelated to nursing, and no experience as an RN, should ever, ever be a practicing NP. I am coming across a lot of very unqualified NPs in my career now, and frankly, they scare me.

    Flame away.
  4. by   meanmaryjean
    OP's posting history leans strongly toward controversy and starting arguments.
  5. by   klone
    Yep. Was going to respond; changed my mind.
  6. by   ICUman
    100% agree with SmilingBluEyes.
    NP's should have RN experience. No direct entry programs.

    I personally choose MD's only, as well.
  7. by   umbdude
    I've seen about 8 NPs in the past, as a patient and family member of a very sick one, and I had wonderful experiences with most of these NPs. The one who prescribed a med to my loved one, which caused an interaction, was an NP with years of RN experience.
  8. by   FrankRN2017
    See, they actively seek ways of bailing out of a situation! LMAO!!! (directed at MeanMary and Klone by the way)
  9. by   klone
    I'm not an NP, kind sir. Neither is MeanMaryJean
  10. by   FrankRN2017
    My fault, Meanmary is further than a NP!
  11. by   traumaRUs
    Staff note: multiple posts have been removed in accordance with TOS.
  12. by   macawake
    Quote from FrankRN2017
    See, they actively seek ways of bailing out of a situation! LMAO!!! (directed at MeanMary and Klone by the way)
    Deciding not to engage when one suspects that a poster is deliberately trying to stir **** doesn't mean that a person is "seeking ways to bail out of a situation". Under those circumstances I think that deciding to not participate is a highly rational decision.

    Quote from FrankRN2017
    In your original post you called me a"******" then changed it to "kind sir". You should be ashamed of yourself. I've reported you btw.
    I'm a bit surprised that you are so sensitive that you felt a need to report that. I agree that we shouldn't call each other names but since you in your OP were telling NPs to:

    Quote from FrankRN2017
    GROW SOME!
    I guess I interpreted that as you having a rather high tolerance for "flamboyant expression", shall we say

    You also laugh your butt off followed by several exclamation points, specifically aimed at two posters. You address them by name, which makes it seem like an attempted taunt. Am I reading this wrong?

    Quote from FrankRN2017
    LMAO!!! (directed at MeanMary and Klone by the way)
    If you had genuinely desired a polite, professional exchange of opinions; wouldn't you have taken care to phrase your contributions in a less inflammatory fashion? That's what I would expect any way. Do you in your opinion have any ownership in how your thread develops?


    Quote from FrankRN2017
    I have noticed that doctors are much more secure with decisions and aren't so scared to prescribe something.
    Quote from FrankRN2017
    Over time I have noticed NP's like to pawn you off to anyone else for your matters if they can.
    A few things. First off, I have to assume that your n= is rather small, both regarding the physicians and nurse practitioners. I mean, we're talking your anecdotal experiences here, right? Have you looked at the available research regarding outcomes for physicians vs NPs? Are they in line with your anecdotal data? Also, I don't believe that "not being scared to prescribe medications" is the optimal approach in every single situation. Sometimes throwing pills at something might not be the best solution, so your parameter for physician superiority at the very least needs to be properly defined and explored further.

    Quote from FrankRN2017
    I have been on testosterone for several years through my family practice doctors. However, as I recently moved, I was set up to see a NP. Well instead of handling the low T issue herself she had to refer me to an endocrinologist? WTH?
    I don't know your particular medical history. From what you shared I can't say that the NP's actions indicates a knowledge deficit or a lack of confidence. Writing referrals to specialists when warranted is something that both physicians and NPs should do. Perhaps the NP thought that the etiology of your low testosterone needed further looking into. Perhaps s/he's being a conscientious and prudent practitioner. Perhaps the NP didn't think that you were currently optimally treated but was wise enough to realize her/his limitations in a specialized and complicated field. Perhaps the NP really did lack knowledge that a reasonable NP ought to possess. It's impossible to know, and I don't have enough information to speculate, nor would I want to even if I had the information.

    What I do know is that I'll take an NP or physician who isn't afraid to write a referral to a specialist in a complex field any time, over one of either profession who is too arrogant and/or ignorant to write referrals even when warranted.
    Last edit by dianah on Jan 2 : Reason: Terms of Service
  13. by   FrankRN2017
    Unnecessary consults and repeat testing wastes money. Cost effective healthcare is today's current focus right? All men experience a decrease in testosterone as they age and a general practitioner should be well past capable of handling this just as my past 2 general physicians have. Not only is this a waste of money but also an inconvenience for patients and ultimately affects patient satisfaction negatively. Furthermore, the NP was about to refill my lexapro without assuring that I was in counseling or any type of therapy but she did not. In my opinion, just refilling a psyche medication without any further supervision or therapy is much more dangerous than testosterone as lexapro in certain circumstances can cause someone to commit suicide if not properly followed or managed correctly. Also, if you do not want to be spoken to then don't post on my thread. That's the better way of deciding you don't want to be involved. Thanks! 😊
    Last edit by FrankRN2017 on Jan 2 : Reason: Further Info added
  14. by   lhflanurseNP
    Just because someone is able to complete NP school and then pass boards does not make them independent thinkers. I have found many NPs that are VERY confident in their patient care and then I have known many who unfortunately for our profession...are just glorified nurses with advanced degrees. When I first started practicing in my community, I had to deal with physician ignorance. Most had NPs working FOR them, but were not seeing patients truly independently. As I continued growing my patient base, these physicians began to see me as an integral part of the health care community and IF I referred a patient to a specialist, they knew I had done everything I could for that patient but they needed more. My referrals...cardiologists for stents, caths, bypass...etc.; orthopedists for replacements; surgeons for surgery; oncologist for cancer. I have yet to refer a patient to an endocrinologist or pulmonologist.

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