As a RN, which would you choose?

  1. Quite recently a friend (non clinical) asked me whether hypothetically if there was a medically critical situation would i choose a life saving intervention or otherwise? Instead i showed her my necklace which i always wear which states "Do Not Resuscitate in an emergency". She was shocked.

    Now this decision was not done lightly. I have witnessed and performed many CPR's in my time. Personally i do think that CPR is an invasive, burdensome and punishing procedure. However, i would not deny anyone seeking this intervention.

    Would you choose CPR or DNR? Kindly share your opinions.
  2. Poll: As a clinical professional, which would you choose?

    • C.P.R

      43.08% 28
    • D.N.R

      36.92% 24
    • Others 9 (e.g. CPR but no intubation)

      20.00% 13
    65 Votes / Multiple Choice
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    About GenieToBe, BSN, RN

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  4. by   hherrn
    The question is a bit simplistic.
    Did I stop breathing after 3 minutes underwater, or has the cancer metastasized so thoroughly that I can't even make my wishes known?

    If I needed a resuscitation for something that was reversible with a good recovery expected, go for it.
    If it was likely that I would be significantly debilitated by resuscitation, let me go.

    I am all for maintaining a high quality of life, and not prolonging death.

    But, in your picture, you look young for a DNR. Question- you walk into the ER for a fairly benign complaint, and go into a lethal dysrythmia, easily correctable with a shock. Do you want the shock? What about an accidental overdose- want Narcan?
  5. by   llg
    I'm with hherrn on this one. It depends on the situation.
  6. by   AceOfHearts<3
    My opinion is the same as others and it's the same as many nurses I work with in the ICU. I do not want to be trached, PEGed, and vent dependent for the rest of my life. Intubation and/or resuscitation are ok if I'm expected to make a meaningful recovery.
    Last edit by AceOfHearts<3 on Oct 1
  7. by   kakamegamama
    When my time comes, I'm not sure I want an option. My first husband always told me to not allow him to survive long enough to be vented, should he appear to die. Well, after my CPR, and full resuscitation efforts by EMS and the ER doc, he got his wish. I actually think he was already dead by the time I got to him, and as hard as the journey was, I'm thankful he received his wish. He knew where he'd spend eternity and was at peace, as am I.

    Sometimes, I wonder with all of the advanced technology if we in the medical profession/nursing profession do not attempt to play God.
  8. by   RotorRunner
    I would have been shocked if you showed me this as well. CPR is lifesaving. Why would you, as a person who is assumably healthy enough to be working as a nurse, not want to be resuscitated?

    Now, if I have metastatic cancer, that's a different story. Or if I'm 90. But there's a reason we do CPR...it work. It saves lives. I know people who have survived sudden cardiac arrest with 100% recovery.
  9. by   VivaLasViejas
    I am a DNR and have documentation to that effect. If I'm not breathing and my heart has stopped, leave me alone. If I'm still alive, then go for it...but only if there's a reasonable chance I might survive and have some quality of life. I don't want to exist in a nursing home being turned Q2h and unable to toilet or feed myself. In that case, I want comfort care only and to be allowed to die naturally. I'm not old yet, in no hurry to be done with life, but I've had a good one for the most part and I know I'll be even happier when I join my husband in Heaven.
  10. by   kakamegamama
    Quote from RotorRunner
    I would have been shocked if you showed me this as well. CPR is lifesaving. Why would you, as a person who is assumably healthy enough to be working as a nurse, not want to be resuscitated?

    Now, if I have metastatic cancer, that's a different story. Or if I'm 90. But there's a reason we do CPR...it work. It saves lives. I know people who have survived sudden cardiac arrest with 100% recovery.
    I'm not sure to whom you are replying.

    Here is an interesting article regarding sequelae of CPR, if anyone is interested.

    Long Term Effects Of Surviving A Cardiac Arrest - Horizon Research Horizon Research
  11. by   psu_213
    I agree with the others who have said that it depends on the situation.

    Question for the group: As an ED nurse, would you take this necklace as a legal mandate? What happens if you are in the community, someone goes down. You see this necklace. Do you, in fact, not do CPR based on this? I'm not trying to invalidate the views of the OP, and I 100% respect the OP's decision. Just curious, however, what other nurses think about necklace.
  12. by   Triddin
    Quote from psu_213
    I agree with the others who have said that it depends on the situation.

    Question for the group: As an ED nurse, would you take this necklace as a legal mandate? What happens if you are in the community, someone goes down. You see this necklace. Do you, in fact, not do CPR based on this? I'm not trying to invalidate the views of the OP, and I 100% respect the OP's decision. Just curious, however, what other nurses think about necklace.
    I don't believe it counts as a legal DNR. There was a case recently where the patient had a DNR tattoo but I believe the consensus was that on its own, it wasnt specific enough to not warrant cpr
  13. by   AnnieOaklyRN
    Did you get this done through your state, if not fyi you will still be getting CPR! As an EMS provider we would never not do CPR because of a necklace a patient had on unless it was a legal for of DNR. Your necklace means absolutely nothing to EMS providers if it isnr legal.

    If this were legal I would be getting one for my sister in law ans following her around with it!
  14. by   Horseshoe
    If it gets me over a temporary hump, yes, please go for it. If I'm terminal and clearly end stage hopeless, no, let's not artificially delay the inevitable.
  15. by   Julius Seizure
    Quote from hherrn
    What about an accidental overdose- want Narcan?
    Would a DNR mean no narcan? If you appeared to have had too many narcotics, were unconscious/obtunded, and had a respiratory rate of 4....would a DNR mean that you don't get narcan?

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