Anatomy of a Code - page 2

You're standing at your computer, charting on your patients. The end of the shift is nearing, and you really want to get this done so that you can get home. As you are typing, you hear a loud... Read More

  1. by   Flyboy17
    Fortunately from the Cath Lab side of codes we usually have very good outcomes. I hate to say just another day at the office but once you run enough of them it really does feel like just another code. Everything is done by ACLS standards unless the MD asks for something differently. Very well written
  2. by   ninja-nurse
    Well written. In my facility, respiratory does the intubation, and nurses give the meds (no pharmacy for us - at least on nights. Don't know about days) but otherwise this is spot on.
  3. by   Certifiable
    Wow, that's a lot of people in one room. You have a pharmacist who draws the meds? cool. Our patient's rooms are so small (all for neutropenic isolation) that it gets extremely crowded as soon when the ventilator is plugged in. When a patient codes (Murphy's law it always happens at the start of a night shift) on my ward (4 RN's, 18 patients), two nurses from the shift are in the room with the code team (usually within 3 minutes they are there. anesthesia doc, icu doc and charge nurse of the hospital) and the other 2 cover the rest of the ward. Of the 2 codes that i've seen, both have been successful and patients extubated not long after a stay in the ICU.
    Codes are scary as hell. And that feeling after everything is done... sheesh.
  4. by   Lynda Lampert, RN
    Hi all,

    I just wanted to say that I appreciate all of the good comments and praise for my writing. Yes, code protocols differ from one facility to another, and this reflected my experience at a very specific work environment. We had private rooms only, we were a trauma center, and we had pretty decent staffing most of the time. It's interesting to see how other facilities and environments handle this very scary situation.

    I know that I would not want to go through this in the back of an ambulance, in a LTC facility, in a shared room, or on an understaffed floor. Unfortunately, for my colleagues, they go through this every day. I salute you, truly, and would encourage everyone to share their experiences of codes. It helps to get it out, it helps new nurses to understand, and it gives the public a true look at how hard nursing really is.

    Lynda

    ETA: This is a scenario of a code that goes smoothly with a happy ending. If I'd actually depicted a code with all its warts and a bad ending . . . I would have had a book!
    Last edit by Lynda Lampert, RN on Jan 21, '15 : Reason: added more info
  5. by   Dream Catcher
    I enjoyed reading this article and the responses. I am a relatively new RN. I am close to finishing my first year. I have not seen a code yet. It is something that I am somewhat anxious about. I have been trained. I am sure that when it happens I will know what to do. However, I am still nervous about it. I suppose it is normal to feel this way.
  6. by   tacomaster
    great article
  7. by   thenightnurse456
    Your writing skills are fantastic! You really painted a picture!

    I find this job so strange. One minute your getting one patient a coke, the next your doing chest compressions and using an AED on another patient. Then the code is over and you go back to the other patients as of nothing huge has just happened.
  8. by   Rod, Male Nurse
    I love me some codes
  9. by   empatheticRN
    Quote from Dream Catcher
    I enjoyed reading this article and the responses. I am a relatively new RN. I am close to finishing my first year. I have not seen a code yet. It is something that I am somewhat anxious about. I have been trained. I am sure that when it happens I will know what to do. However, I am still nervous about it. I suppose it is normal to feel this way.
    6 months into my job at a hospital I had my first code which was last week. Very scary but with good team mates, it went smoothly. Doing compressions or writing the code are two of the easiest jobs during the code because you get to watch and hear everything in a more relaxed manner.
  10. by   j.la
    That was really good writing! I am a nursing student working as a CNA. I have not experienced a code yet. It scares the crap out of me.
  11. by   VANurse2010
    Why does this hospitalized patient not already have IV access? Why are we not drawing labs off the IV because of "hospital policy?" Hello, it's a CODE!
  12. by   Susie2310
    Quote from VANurse2010
    Why does this hospitalized patient not already have IV access?
    I enjoyed the article, but I wondered about the IV access too. In the OP it stated that the patient was expecting to go home today, but it didn't state that the discharge order had already been written.

    Could the OP tell us why the patient had no IV access?
  13. by   ChipNurse
    I wish every code ran like this..

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