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Certifiable BSN, RN

Oncology/hematology
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Certifiable has 5 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Oncology/hematology.

Certifiable's Latest Activity

  1. Certifiable

    Trouble conceiving

    I can't do the basal temp measurment because of the shift work... If i'm racing around at work my body temp will be elevated regardless of my cycle. Cervical fluid is the next step. I just don't know if that is putting too much pressure on myself after 5 months...
  2. Certifiable

    Trouble conceiving

    I've been trying to conceive for 5 months. Now, i know that it's only "trouble" if it's been over a year. But nurses are not your average textbook patient! I do two nights and two days\evening shifts a week (8.5hours each) in a high stress BMT unit. I'm 32 yrs old. Major work stress, my age, shift work (fatigue, lack of sleep and weird sleeping hours), not much physical activity outside of work (not overweight though)... Just sounds textbook for infertility. How do all the nurses in my ward get pregnant?! It's really starting to get me down... after 3 months i've started bursting into tears every time i get my period...
  3. Certifiable

    RN OCN compounding chemo

    Which chemo? Do you have a special infrastructure for it (i.e. a covered med area with a partition and a ventilation system that removes all air particles/med sprays during preparation)? Special gowns, gloves and masks?
  4. Certifiable

    Stop the Silence...Violence Against Nurses

    Two weeks ago, a mentally disturbed patient walked into a community clinic, sprayed a nurse with lighter fluid and set her on fire. She died. Apparently, he was upset about adverse effects of his flu shot. He came in to complain about it a few times. Tragic.
  5. Certifiable

    Night shift and mandatory meetings

    I work 8 hours shifts and the monthly staff meeting is always scheduled at 13:00, everyone is expected to show up - but if the nurses from the previous night shift don't - no one says anything. They read the minutes printout that get sent along with their salary slip.
  6. Certifiable

    rituximab infusion rate (calculation)

    Exactly as written in "Cancer nursing: Principles and practice 7th edition" :)
  7. Certifiable

    15 Minutes in the Life of a Nurse

    I disagree. If I get a call from the lab about crazy electrolights or dangerous CBC, it's much quicker to intervene. I can immediately stop a drug that can be causing more harm, open fluids, check vitals and then... I call the doc and notify him of the problem. There is a lot that needs to be done before a doc makes a decision. Like in a hematology patient with PLT of 15K, he may not requite platelets if he's not actively bleeding. All that aside. This post describes my job to the T.
  8. Certifiable

    How common is chemo through peripheral IV?

    Very common.
  9. Certifiable

    Ganciclovir, how to prepare it?

    Hi, We also don't receive it prepared from the pharmacy. In my unit, we have what we call a "hood" that you prepare drugs in. in theory it sucks out the air inside thus you are less likely to be exposed. However, we are still supposed to use gloves and a surgical mask while handling gangyclovir. Not all nurses do, unfortunately.
  10. Certifiable

    A good reference book? help! CON

    Hi all, I'm doing a CON course overseas and unfortunately the academic level is not very good. Can anyone recommend a good text book (one that is relatively up-to-date)? I'm really at my wit's end about this! I wish I could quite the program but I can't, so I need to take my education into my own hands. HELP!
  11. Certifiable

    Dumbest thing a doctor has done/said to you

    When a senior doctor refused my request for a urinary catheter in a patient with Breast CA + mets to the brain (=every position change was painful) who was receiving mannitol and chemo (=lots of cytotoxic urine to come in contact with) and the new resident from India said to me "you'll get plenty of practice changing diapers!". ARE YOU F*&^$# KIDDING ME?! Never in my life have I wanted to punch someone more than in that moment...
  12. Certifiable

    I want a social life

    Misery loves company: I totally get the loneliness behind this post! I'm more alone now than i've ever been in my 20+ yrs of life, curtesy of 8hr hospital shifts (i do them all-morn/noon/night). My close group of friends have broken up and moved to different cities, i live with roomates that are not my social cup of tea (but good and normal apts are rare and i am not moving), and the few friends that i still have can never hang out because of my crappy schedule. The nurses at work are great but have families of their own and are not exactly in my age group for sitting at a bar. Being single like this sucks. I'm halfheartedly inclined to take my patients up on their offers for blind dates of someone they know who will be ""perfect" for me. Very lonely.
  13. Certifiable

    Anatomy of a Code

    Wow, that's a lot of people in one room. You have a pharmacist who draws the meds? cool. Our patient's rooms are so small (all for neutropenic isolation) that it gets extremely crowded as soon when the ventilator is plugged in. When a patient codes (Murphy's law it always happens at the start of a night shift) on my ward (4 RN's, 18 patients), two nurses from the shift are in the room with the code team (usually within 3 minutes they are there. anesthesia doc, icu doc and charge nurse of the hospital) and the other 2 cover the rest of the ward. Of the 2 codes that i've seen, both have been successful and patients extubated not long after a stay in the ICU. Codes are scary as hell. And that feeling after everything is done... sheesh.
  14. Certifiable

    New Nurse Having Panic Attacks!

    It's been a few weeks since your post so I hope everything is alright. I'm a new RN, 9 months into the job. I vividly recall trouble sleeping, nightmares (based on true and false patients/situations) and sometimes a horrible, heavy anxiety. Once I couldn't sleep before a morning shift, i just walked around and around the dining room table until I somehow silenced my pounding heart. When I sleep badly because of nerves, I tell people at work - they're really nice about it and empathetic. Things have improved drastically, my nightmares have decreased - they only happen maybe MAYBE twice a month. I count that as a victory, that my subconscious shuts up. Working out helps me. Nothing like endorphins to perk you up. Life's natural uppers.
  15. Certifiable

    Starting on the bone marrow transplant unit - help!

    Thank you all for the great advice. A little update: i'm 6 months into working on the BMT unit, and my heart still pounds whenever the charge nurse writes the patient assignments on the whiteboard -gulp! the problem is, during my month-long orientation, i was so focused on learning all these new nursing skills that all the important info that was bmt focused flew straight over my head, so i'm still playing "catch up".... I do fine with patients post bmt, managing symptoms and juggling AB regimens, but pre-transplant i really dread- back to back chemo - I never get comfortable with that. Another problem is the day shift. My hospital works in 8hours shifts so the 7-15 shift is when most of the chemo and bloodwork is done- I HATE that shift! There is a ton of insanely pressurized work, worst pay--- in all i feel like i've been run over by a truck by the end of the shift. For some weird reason our unit is really low on transplant patients at the moment so our pt:rn ratio is waaaay off. So every so often our nurses are being floated elsewhere (mostly hem/onco)- tonight i was sent to hematology as a float nurse- I was super stressed all night! I almost missed the last bus home! And did i mention the kids? Our unit usually has 2 kids (5yrs and up) receiving a transplant- i really hate working with kids for a number of reasons, but the main thing is just the medicine safety issue- the doasages are different, less fluids going in- and when they crash- they do it in spectacular fashion. Oh, and not to mention that the language most spoken is arabic or russian- which i am not fluent in? (Arabic is easier to pick up than Russian though) I still don't know if this is the specialty i want to work in, at the moment what really keeps me going is the great staff that i work with- 100% willing to help even when they're super busy.
  16. I'm a new grad, on my first job in a specialized unit. It's extremely stressful work (I dream about it quite often), the patients are really ill and we also get a lot of patients from other departments when they are full (which somehow happens during the night shift...) and we have a few empty beds. Morning shift is the craziest, the patient-staff ratio is the lowest but it's crazy because that's when most of the work is done. I'm very anxious when I'm at work, in 3 months of work, I can count on one hand the amount of times when I've had a relaxed feeling after work. Also, so often I dream of things that have happened or never happened that my sleep is never restful. If it wasn't for the staff and their constant encouragement - I'd probably have given up by now, but they keep me going. I'm not sure that I want to stay because of the nature of the nursing that I do, but until I make up my mind I know that I have the support of the staff - it makes all the difference in the world! But even the great staffing doesn't prevent me from being down and exhausted. It's really hard making plans with friends because of my schedule. My friends with "normal" jobs like to meet up but it's not their priority because they are not as stressed as I am -so when I can't meet people or plans get canceled it's really hard for me. These 3 months have flown by - i'm worried that i'll blink and time will have passed, but my "down" state of mind won't have changed.
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