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Funny & Cute Things Our Demented Patients Say

Geriatric Article   (56,190 Views 100 Comments 508 Words)

TheCommuter has 10 years experience as a BSN, RN and works as a CRRN, now a case management RN.

21 Likes; 1 Follower; 228 Articles; 315,353 Visitors; 27,607 Posts

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The intended purpose of this article is to use the written word to capture some lighthearted memories and recollections about the funny and sometimes cute statements that my demented patients have made over the years. Working with the demented elderly population can be interesting. You are reading page 4 of Funny & Cute Things Our Demented Patients Say. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

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A friend told me about a resident in the nursing home she worked at who had Alzheimers.This lady had always went to chuch and her son was a preacher. She did not like taking a bath. They would use a lift to put her in the tub. When the pt was lifted up in the air getting ready to go into the tub, she threw her hands up and said, " Dear Lord Jesus, Please send me two heart attacks. One for me and one for this b**** getting ready to bathe me"!

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TheCommuter has 10 years experience as a BSN, RN and works as a CRRN, now a case management RN.

21 Likes; 1 Follower; 228 Articles; 315,353 Visitors; 27,607 Posts

A member of my family suffers from dementia, & I find nothing funny or cute about it. There is a thread elsewhere on this site that talks about the elderly being devalued, & I thought of this thread.

Go ahead, let the flaming begin...

Good day! I wrote the article about devaluation of the elderly, and I am also the author of this article.

The demented population makes some of the funniest, wittiest, and cutest statements around. Keep in mind that we are laughing with this population, and not at them. There is a significant difference.

I'm assured that the people who post on this forum care deeply about the value and dignity of this population. Without a sense of humor, this profession is capable of sucking the soul out of even the most caring healthcare worker.

Many of us have family members with declining cognitive function. There's no need to flame or invite flames when none are warranted. Thank you. :)

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BrandonLPN has 5 years experience and works as a LPN.

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A member of my family suffers from dementia, & I find nothing funny or cute about it. There is a thread elsewhere on this site that talks about the elderly being devalued, & I thought of this thread.Go ahead, let the flaming begin...

I will concede that working with elderly demented patients for years *can* make one somewhat desensitized to it. When my grandma's dementia took hold recently, I'll admit I didn't find even her most benign and harmless episodes to be very amusing. When my 'little old ladies' at work talk about having to make dinner for their long dead husbands it makes me smile and nod. When my grandma says the same thing about my grandpa who died in 1991, it's just unsettling. So I get your point.

But with all of that said, think how much more horrible nursing homes would be if we treated dementia as a tragedy. Not just for the staff, but for the residents, too. You're totally off base about this thread being disrespectful. Humor is important. We need more seriousness and dram in nursing like we need a hole in the head. If a nurse can't laugh at the funny side of aging and dementia, then he really shouldn't work in a nursing home.

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Double-Helix has 6 years experience and works as a Nurse, Children's Hospital.

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I definitely agree with therapeutic fibbing.

One of my favorite nursing home moments came when I was working as a CNA. I had a patient who was repeatedly trying to climb out of bed, but physically unable to do so. After a few times of helping her get back into the bed, I finally asked her what was wrong. She began a long story about how she was so concerned about "John" and "my father" because they were at evening Christmas Eve mass, there was a snow storm coming, and there was no one to pick them up. She only settled down after I assured her that I would leave immediately and go bring them home.

Before I left the room she smiled, squeezed my hand, thanked me, and wished me a "Merry Christmas."

I knew that reality orientation would have been futile in this situation. It was, after all, the middle of July.

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mixyRN works as a RN.

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A patient with dementia sings to his bedside sitter:

"Roses are red

Violets are blue

I love your fat a$$

But I'll still cheat on you!"

He had us all rolling on the floor with laughter. :)

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CapeCodMermaid has 30+ years experience and works as a DNS.

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The thread next to this is how the elderly are devalued. This kind of thread seems to add to that attitude.

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TheCommuter has 10 years experience as a BSN, RN and works as a CRRN, now a case management RN.

21 Likes; 1 Follower; 228 Articles; 315,353 Visitors; 27,607 Posts

The thread next to this is how the elderly are devalued. This kind of thread seems to add to that attitude.
I'm the one who wrote the article about how the elderly are devalued, and I am also the author of this article.

I do not feel that sharing the funny, witty, and cute statements made by demented elderly residents devalues them in any form or fashion. I've previously mentioned that the healthcare workers who care about the welfare of this population are laughing with them, and not at them. There is a significant difference.

We can either recall their statements with fondness for the elder and a healthy sense of humor, or we can recall them with sheer horror and sadness for their declining cognitive function. The former, in my humble opinion, is milder for all involved, including the residents.

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BrandonLPN has 5 years experience and works as a LPN.

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The thread next to this is how the elderly are devalued. This kind of thread seems to add to that attitude.

Someone needs a sense of humor injection! Stat!

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CapeCodMermaid has 30+ years experience and works as a DNS.

19 Likes; 1 Follower; 59,184 Visitors; 6,004 Posts

I have a sense of humor, thank you. There is a fine line between laughing with someone and laughing at them. Perhaps I am a bit over sensitive today since it was my 11th day of work without a break AND I had to talk to the staff about NOT calling residents who can't hear deaffies.

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BrandonLPN has 5 years experience and works as a LPN.

28 Likes; 34,892 Visitors; 3,358 Posts

I wasn't there when your staff said that, but I'm guessing there was no real disrespect intended. As long as there was no malice and they were talking only amongst themselves, I don't see the harm. I've heard residents referred to as "walkie-talkies", "tube feeders", "totals", "drugies" etc. And not just in LTC. It's even more prevalent in hospitals. They're just labels we use. No, it's not the most professional way to talk, but we're only human. Trust me, doctors talk like this amongst themselves, too. Not that serious. If you go around *looking* for something to be upset and indignant about, you'll find it every time. Focus on the stuff that *really* matters and let the little stuff go. JMHO.

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nursefrances has 6 years experience and works as a RN in Ophthalmology ambulatory surgery center.

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Yesterday, I had the sweetest patient with dementia, in her 90's. Every once in a while she would look at me with pursed lips and narrow her eyes and say "you.....are a wicked, wicked woman." She didn't like me to do anything to her, bp check, She said this to me when I changed her iv transparent dressing. She really was the sweetest lady when her family was with her.

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I worked in a LTC facility as a CNA for a short time before being accepted into nursing school. I was on the floor below the dementia unit but there was still some spillover to our floor and a LOT of borderline elders. I not only got to observe a lot of these amusing things going on but heard many stories from seasoned aides. I'll never, as long as I live, forget the story about Mrs Z:

Mrs Z was 98 years old and really shouold have been on the dementia ward but there was no room. She was, well...ENTHUSIASTIC about the opposite sex and propositioned every elderly gentleman on our floor as well as the few male nurses and aides. She even started flashing residents in the dining room so after that they started putting her shirts on backwards. She was frequently caught masturbating and would moan quite loudly. And she would tell anyone at all who would listen about her late husband's lovemaking prowess, extolling the virtues of his, well...ya know.

One night she said to her nurse that all she wanted was to have sex one more time before she died. Just one last lay and she could die happy. The nurse was moved by how sincere Mrs. Z was, and she went out the next day and bought her a vibrating "implement". She gave it to Mrs Z who was as ecstatic as all get-out. She left Mrs. Z to enjoy her present, and that very night Mrs. Z passed in her sleep with a huge grin on her face.

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