How often can I say no?

  1. Do you get called in often? Do you say no or yes more often? I worked from last Friday all the way till Tuesday. I kid you not, staffing called me everyday Wednesday thru tonight (I do work this weekend). I have a family. I honestly had things to do with my family and I was pooped. I am just feeling a bit guilty because I said no three night in a row. I have only had my licence for one month. In the past four weeks, I have been called in twice. Get this, they asked if I could do 12 hours. We were on our way to the movies, my hubby and kids looked at me like this when my phone rang....:angthts::spbox: Oh yeah, why did I give them my cell phone number? I do appreciate my job but geeze! Can I get some cheese with my whine?
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    About DAMomma

    Joined: Apr '06; Posts: 329; Likes: 32

    13 Comments

  3. by   NC Girl BSN
    I had the same problem when I worked in LTC. My question to you is why on earth do you answer the phone? I have caller ID and anytime I saw the faciliites name pop up, I would let it ring to voice mail. In the beginning I kinda felt guilty because I was new and felt like I need to be a team player. I soon learned that I had a life and was not gonna be a slave to this nursing home. So my advice is to screen your calls and let it go to voice mail if you do not want to work.
  4. by   lisacsu84
    boy i wish i had that problem lol, I have been called off more than called in. I am not saying anything bad, just here in colorado things are so bad. I got called off tonight, we only had 8pts. I would definitley have said no if they called me that many times. do you have caller id? I don't always answer on my day off. Good luck to you.
  5. by   Thankful RN,BSN
    I have no interest in working any ot at this time. Therefore, i don't answer the phone when my job calls. It's very simple. My supervisor did make the comment once that i was difficult to get in touch with. That us exactly the way i want it and i feel no guilt!
  6. by   caliotter3
    Turning off one's phone or using caller ID and not answering the phone, works for avoiding unpleasant conversations.
  7. by   ®Nurse
    I used to use what I lovingly called "Plausible Deniability" and let the phone ring to voice mail and then never answer the call. My response was "Oh really? You needed me to work? I'm sooo sorry, I never got that call."

    Now I pick up each and every phone call and tell them exactly how much fun I'm having at the moment, or how much I'm enjoying myself away from work, or what project I've got planned to sink my teeth into for that day, and then I tell them "I won't be coming in to night, but good luck finding someone. You guys have a great day."
  8. by   llg
    I agree with the others. If your employer has chosen to have an insufficient number of nurses on the payroll so that they regularly have to scramble to find people to work at the last minute ... well, that was their decision ... and it is THEIR problem, not yours. Don't answer the phone, or say something simple such as "I'm sorry. I have other plans."

    However ... it may be politically smart to volunteer every once-in-a-while. So, look at your schedule and figure out what shift would work for YOU to pick up as an extra shift. Then offer to pick it up if needed. That way, you get the "brownie points" for being helpful, but you do it only when it suits you. Do that once every 4-6 weeks and that should be sufficient to keep you on good terms with your boss without over-stressing yourself or your family.
  9. by   southernbelle08
    I already work OT one week. We do 4 days one week, 3 days the next at my job. There is no way I am coming in on my day off, so they'd save their time and energy to just skip over my name on the list. I have a life outside of that place, and I am going to live it. So far I have not been called, but I have only been at this job for 2 months.
  10. by   nursealanarae
    You HAVE to say no. They will constantly call you and EXPECT you to work extra. You have a life outside your job. if they need staff that badly, they should hire more.
  11. by   Freedom42
    I am called in constantly. During the past two weeks, I worked 12 consecutive days before getting some time off. On two occasions, I left work at 7:15 a.m., got home and turned on my cell phone 15 minutes later, and found messages asking if I could come in at 3 p.m. after working all night. No, thanks.

    I agree that it can be politically smart to take call-ins when you can, especially during that 90-day probationary period. With that in mind, I did something different when I signed up for this new job: I gave the hospital only my cell phone number, not my home phone, so I can turn it on and off as I wish. I also do not offer excuses for why I won't come in. A simple, "Sorry, I'm not available," is usually all it takes. When they've told me they were really in a bind -- usually due to a scheduling error -- I helped them out.

    I also agree, however, that if you're working for an institution that is perpetually shorthanded, that's not your problem.
  12. by   luvschoolnursing
    No. That's all you have to say. And when they ask again, say "No" Don't be rude, but don't make an excuse. If you want to do your best for your employer, you have to do your best for yourself and your family when you are not scheduled for work. I learned that early on when I worked at the hospital. They will suck the life out of you if they get a chance.
  13. by   TX_TeleRN
    Quote from llg
    I agree with the others. If your employer has chosen to have an insufficient number of nurses on the payroll so that they regularly have to scramble to find people to work at the last minute ... well, that was their decision ... and it is THEIR problem, not yours. Don't answer the phone, or say something simple such as "I'm sorry. I have other plans."

    However ... it may be politically smart to volunteer every once-in-a-while. So, look at your schedule and figure out what shift would work for YOU to pick up as an extra shift. Then offer to pick it up if needed. That way, you get the "brownie points" for being helpful, but you do it only when it suits you. Do that once every 4-6 weeks and that should be sufficient to keep you on good terms with your boss without over-stressing yourself or your family.

    I agree. Planned OT is easier to handle than last minute OT -- and it shows your boss you're a team player when you occasionally pick up an extra shift. Unless I have to go to work, I turn my ringer off at night. And if work calls when my ringer is on, I do answer the phone and politely say "no." Most CNs who are professional accept the "no" without asking "why not?". But for those who do why not?, I just tell them that I already have plans without going into details (i.e., plan to lunch with friends, run errands, or just plainly rest my tired feet).
  14. by   Pixie.RN
    One of our docs said, "I just tell them I've had a few beers when they'd try to call me in!" LOL ... that would work like a charm! Then the "lush" rumors might start, though ... heh.

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