Jump to content
Freedom42

Freedom42

Member Member
  • Joined:
  • Last Visited:
  • 914

    Content

  • 0

    Articles

  • 14,242

    Visitors

  • 0

    Followers

  • 0

    Points

Freedom42's Latest Activity

  1. Freedom42

    RN refresher course online

    I'm an NP. I previously worked ED as an RN. I'd like to go back to ED during the pandemic, but it's been a few years. Can anyone recommend an online refresher course?
  2. Freedom42

    Have you ever witnessed this situation?

    This isn't rocket science. I pick up my meds at a supermarket. The pharmacy has a sign posted that asks other customers to respect others' privacy by coming to the counter only when called. There's a small rope line just like at the bank. The pharmacist keeps his voice down. Problem solved. No special architecture required. I agree with GrumpRN63: I'm disappointed at the number of people who think this is no big deal. As for the nurse who says that's "just like giving meds in the ED," I beg to differ. If there's someone else in the room, I warn my patients that I'm about to ask personal questions and ask them if they'd like privacy; when appropriate, I ask people to leave. And I always close the door when I'm talking regardless of who's in the room. The OP dealt with someone who was behaving thoughtlessly. The problem needs to be brought to his employer's attention so that all who work in that pharmacy respect customer privacy and comply with the law.
  3. Freedom42

    Frequent Flyers

    Room them somewhere north of Siberia, without a phone or a TV. When they ask for a meal tray, tell them that you only serve meals at designated times. Period. The doc will more than likely recognize the patient's name and, presuming it's the usual symptoms or complaints, leave them waiting for a long time -- so long that some will decide to leave. If they come in drunk, they are required to either a) commit to detox or b) remain in ED Siberia until a breathazlyzer registers zero. If there's clearly nothing wrong with them, remind them early and often that they will have to arrange their own transportation home (presuming, as my hospital does, that yours no longer provides cab passes). And if the patient is unhappy with their care (i.e., prescription), make sure you chart any remarks along the lines of, "Well, I'll only come back tomorrow," each and every time he or she says it so that your department head can report them for abusing the system. That's what enabled our local paramedic service to refuse to stop transporting two FFs several times a week. Sometime in the past year, I saw an article -- on Medscape, I think -- about how to deal with "ultra-high frequent fliers." Maybe it offered some helpful information, but I'll never know. I couldn't get past the definition of an ultra-high FF as being 15 or more ED visits a year. Seriously? Our champs rack up 100+.
  4. Freedom42

    Vodka tampons?!?

    Again, the issue was not the quote from a 14-year-old. It was the praising of the quote by an adult. And I'm quite confident that neither the teenager nor the adult considered "retarded" anything but pejorative. However, I'm sure the posters on this forum who have retarded children will take comfort in knowing that English is dynamic.
  5. Freedom42

    Vodka tampons?!?

    Thank you. I understand why kids use the word that way; after all, they hear adults use it that way, unfortunately. What bothered me was the poster's "well said" response to the remark.
  6. Freedom42

    Vodka tampons?!?

    I don't mean to digress from the topic of this thread. Call me old fashioned, but I still prefer my booze in a glass. This quote, however, is troubling. It's offensive. Can we please stop using the word "retarded" to refer to things that we think are stupid? If you think that the above is "well said," I ask you to substitute "disabled" or "handicapped" for the word "retarded." Then see if you think the use of the word "retarded" in the above sentence is still acceptable. I don't mean to attack the poster, because I know this use of the word is widespread. It drives me crazy when I hear it at work. On behalf of my mentally retarded friends, I suggest that nurses should know better.
  7. This is true of some Catholic hospitals. Not all. I work for a Catholic hospital that performs therapeutic abortions, dispenses birth control if that is what the patient's provider prescribes, and gives Plan B in the ER.
  8. Freedom42

    Patient dies after nurse administers pancuronium

    It's not weird. A lot of sentinel events never make headlines. This case is making news now because the patient's family just filed suit. You can find a lot more about it in Google News.
  9. It's true, some people are nearly impossible. But I'll say this, as one of my patients recently pointed out: My charge nurse could start an IV on a dead man. She's that good. I have never seen her miss. When I started, she told me to find a man with muscular forearms and study his vasculature so that I could understand where to palpate. She's right. That's better than looking at any text book.
  10. The lower the albumin level, the tougher the stick. My supervisor gave me a good tip: Use two tourniquets, one in the usual place, the other about three inches above that. Works well with hands to really concentrate blood in a small area. You might also have a colleague pull back the skin and hold it taught. When all else fails, I look along the ring finger, along the feet, and between the armpit and breast.
  11. Do I have this right? Obstructive lung disease: FEV1 is low, FEV1/FVC is low. Restrictive lung disease: FEV1 is low (?), FEV1/FVC is high (latter ratio may be normal or high, actually). I can't find an answer to the FEV1 status for restrictive (interstitial) lung disease in my text, and I'm not finding what I'm looking for online, either. Any help appreciated.
  12. Freedom42

    Retired, now what?

    I admire your perseverance. It takes a lot to fight your way back from what you've suffered. It's a shame that we don't take better care of our nurses after they've spent so many years giving care to others. What about volunteering? It might not fill your wallet, but it might help your soul. I've volunteered at public schools in my area to give vaccinations. It's fun to work with kids, and I enjoy meeting nurses from different specialties who like to volunteer as well. It's a short-term commitment, just a few hours at a time during the fall months. Schools also look for substitute nurses. Another alternative might be hospice. I would think nurses would find someone with your experience invaluable as a volunteer. Good luck to you. It's out there. Someone who perseveres as you have is bound to find it.
  13. Freedom42

    Confused about new grad salaries!

    I would check the website for the department of labor of a particular state. They do frequent wage and salary surveys, although they don't necessarily break them down by level of experience. I do think they're a lot more accurate than sites like monster.com and salary.com, however.
  14. Freedom42

    What does "defense verdict was returned" mean?

    It means that the people who sued lost. A defense verdict is returned in favor of the defense, the people being sued.
  15. Um, no. This is yet another example of why you cannot trust Fox News. Attorneys for the hospital had already notified the court that it would not require nurses to participate in the training or any service related to abortion prior to a hearing on Nov. 18. The judge in the case then issued a "let's make it clear" temporary restraining order, which is standard in this type of case. The hospital still maintains that it does not require nurses to participate in abortion if it offends their religious beliefs. Curiously, Fox continues to leave that out. Is the hospital forcing nurses to participate in abortion? I don't know. My point is, before you pass judgment, you ought to have all of the facts, not just the ones that outlets with an agenda want you to have. I am skeptical that a hospital would flaunt a well-known federal law and risk all of the penalties that would accompany violating it.
  16. The hospital denies that the nurses are being forced to assist