First job and thrown to wolves too early?

Posted

Specializes in Med Surg, Vascular, E.N.T. Has 3 years experience.

I'm like 3 weeks into my first job which suppose to initially be 12 weeks new grad program when I first spoke to them. Now the paper work they gave me said up to 10 weeks and nurses on the floor say they basically get a full patient load on their on at 6 weeks with no preceptor.

The first 2 weeks we mainly did paper work and computer orientation and by the first day on the floor I was given half of the preceptors patients on my own along with the preceptors available to assist . They no longer do preceptor shadowing. The place is short staffed and people are leaving left and right. I think its rather dangerous to be leaving me with patients on my own the very first day. I get the impression they just need to fill positions as quickly as possible. I am a fast learner but I don't want to be unsafe in my first job and like make a tragic mistake and risk my new license. Its a med-surg floor with lower acquity if that makes a difference.

I have another interview coming up soon at another larger institution and they are associated with a major university and do lots of research and its a teaching hospital, so I'm thinking their training will be better. I originally was not going to go to this second interview since I already got my first RN job but I feel totally unsafe with my current training even though I really need the money.

If the pay matches I'm thinking of jumping ship and going to this other hospital, which also happens to be my dream place to work-although not my dream position(another med-surg) its a foot in if I get an offer.

Anyone else experienced this? Being thrown to the wolves too early. Or is it just how all new RNs feel at their first job during new grad training.

Also has anyone quit a new grad position for another new grad position this early in the game and will doing this adversely affect for career/resume?

I think this will set the pace for my nursing career so I want to make the right decision.

Lev, BSN, RN

Specializes in Emergency - CEN. Has 7 years experience. 9 Articles; 2,802 Posts

If you get the other job, take it. It is hard as a new grad but a short staffed unit is a terrible environment for a developing nurse. What is the nurse to patient ratio?

Dyoshirn

46 Posts

Many of us have had a similar experience. At my first RN job, on my very first day, I was given 8 patients and my preceptor had her own set of 8 patients (talk about short staffed) I was so scared. But you learn so much. That first job experience has molded me beyond belief. Now I work somewhere else which is MUCH better but I am not afraid of work, I'm willing to learn new things, I never have a bad attitude towards a busy day because I know what it's like to be thrown to the wolves. So of course be safe but take it as 'training' for future challenges. Remember you've received the basics in school and don't be afraid to ask questions.

peachnurse22

21 Posts

It never hurts to go to an interview- you'll always learn something from it at the very least. Since you already have a job, you don't have as much to lose. Ask important questions at the interview - including the nurse to patient ratio and what the orientation will be like. Best of luck to you!

RunBabyRN

Specializes in L&D, infusion, urology. Has 2 years experience. 3,677 Posts

Definitely go to the other interview. Protect your license!! That just doesn't even sound safe. No wonder they have such high turnover there.

ArrowRN, BSN, RN

Specializes in Med Surg, Vascular, E.N.T. Has 3 years experience. 5 Articles; 1,145 Posts

Its night shift and The nurse patient ratio is typical 6 or 7 per nurse. So the preceptor gets the patients then she takes half 3 or 4 most serious ones and I take 3, by the end of next week I am expected to get up to 5 and she gets 2. I sorta understand what they doing but for example the first day i had a new admission on my own and I barely knew how to chart...the perceptor did not even coach me through it, I mean what if I, missed something important...its all on me. I took nights because its sorta slower(but not really)... thank goodness I did not take days. I plan to go to the other interview to see what its like.

DatMurse

Specializes in Hematology/Oncology. Has 3 years experience. 792 Posts

Definitely go to the other interview. Protect your license!! That just doesn't even sound safe. No wonder they have such high turnover there.

people have this idea that for some reason having more patients or a high ratio will make you lose your license.

People lose their license because they violate the state's NPA.

amoLucia

Specializes in retired LTC. 7,495 Posts

There's no guarantee that the second position may (or may not) turn out just like your current one re orientation and pt load. There's that old proverb about 'the grass being greener...'

You will be taking as great a risk with position #2 as you did with the first.

MostlysunnyRN

70 Posts

Sorry you had this experience, I totally feel for you because I wrote a very similar post just a few weeks ago, where I was pulled off orientation for a shift when the unit was understaffed. It seems like this is happening more and more. It's unfortunate that your preceptor has, basically, abandoned you to learn on your own which is unfair to you. I'd advise you to advocate for yourself at this point. Can you meet with the unit manager or director and let them know your concerns? Maybe change preceptors? You could definitely do the other interview, but keep in mind many employers are selling sand at the beach, telling you anything to get you in and not holding up to their end once you're onboard. Hope it all works out for you.

desertstar6

45 Posts

Im in the same boat as you. I'm a new grad. I had only 4 weeks orientation with 2 days of class room teaching. Had 4 different preceptors. None of them shadowed me and I had to share my preceptor with 3 other new nurses. Patient ratio 6 to 1. It's hard especially on a med/Surg with patient with high acuities. I got an interview with my dream job though so hopefully it's not a grass is greener on the other side type of thing. So my advise is use all the things you wish you could have know from your current job to use to ask questions for your interview. Don't bash your employer. Say you want to leave cause you want to seek better training and a safer environment as a new nurse.

ArrowRN, BSN, RN

Specializes in Med Surg, Vascular, E.N.T. Has 3 years experience. 5 Articles; 1,145 Posts

Sorry you had this experience, I totally feel for you because I wrote a very similar post just a few weeks ago, where I was pulled off orientation for a shift when the unit was understaffed. It seems like this is happening more and more. It's unfortunate that your preceptor has, basically, abandoned you to learn on your own which is unfair to you. I'd advise you to advocate for yourself at this point. Can you meet with the unit manager or director and let them know your concerns? Maybe change preceptors? You could definitely do the other interview, but keep in mind many employers are selling sand at the beach, telling you anything to get you in and not holding up to their end once you're onboard. Hope it all works out for you.

Well its not the perceptors fault, its a management decision to no longer have shadowing, I've already discussed with the person in charge of training that I had issues with the methods and I even offered suggestions to have at least 1 day to shadow but the management would not have it. I said it in a way that I still enjoy the challange and that I will get the hang of it, as I dont wanna be fired from my first job either.

My interview is tomorrow have not prepared much cause I know what I want. Training is not the only issue but I going in with a mindset that I love where am at but I think this other place could take me further. My only thing is I need night shifts, both locations are far and night pay covers the gas bill. Oh by the way and I got a call from a third hospital today. lol :) I know classmates who work their and I know they required a contract, not liking that choice but its also closer to home.

MostlysunnyRN

70 Posts

Well its not the perceptors fault, its a management decision to no longer have shadowing, I've already discussed with the person in charge of training that I had issues with the methods and I even offered suggestions to have at least 1 day to shadow but the management would not have it. I said it in a way that I still enjoy the challange and that I will get the hang of it, as I dont wanna be fired from my first job either.

My interview is tomorrow have not prepared much cause I know what I want. Training is not the only issue but I going in with a mindset that I love where am at but I think this other place could take me further. My only thing is I need night shifts, both locations are far and night pay covers the gas bill. Oh by the way and I got a call from a third hospital today. lol :) I know classmates who work their and I know they required a contract, not liking that choice but its also closer to home.

Well, at any rate, congrats to you on getting yet another job interview! I got a call today for an interview from the largest hospital network in my state. I'm pretty excited about it and a former classmate works at the hospital location that called and really likes it. Hopefully you'll find a better fit.