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Failed for Clinical-but no proof

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by Misscruella Misscruella (Member)

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You are reading page 6 of Failed for Clinical-but no proof. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

10,751 Visitors; 1,002 Posts

The only advice that I could offer to move forward would be -- try to learn from this experience and then put it behind you.. Try to find another program that will accept you at this point... Be aware that may be a challenge as many programs do have policies to not accept students that have already failed one nursing program. This means that you need to cast your net far and wide and include all colleges and community colleges that you could realistically attend.. Even if it means trying for either a for-profit college that takes just about anyone with a bank account.. 

Also, you could consider attempting an LPN program and then bridging to the RN role.... I have known several nurses that have done this due to failing their first attempt at a RN program and did in fact continue on to achieve their goal of becoming a RN.

Best of luck.  

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2,082 Visitors; 313 Posts

At the end of the day, you need to take responsibility for your actions.  Nursing school is full of people who have had setbacks, pushed through, and succeeded.  I've also seen plenty of students who write 10 paragraphs about why it isn't their fault and how their instructors are out to get them, and fail again or just quit outright.  You can choose to be either of these people, but being the second type isn't going to make you an RN.

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3 Followers; 96,591 Visitors; 36,686 Posts

I think that your concentration and energy should be on finding a new program, if indeed, you have processed what has happened and are ready to show a change in yourself.  But even in just skimming your post, it seems that you still are looking to point responsibility away from yourself.  As long as you don't take responsibility for your part in this, you will never be successful in this endeavor.  

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3 Followers; 96,591 Visitors; 36,686 Posts

BTW, should you decide to go the LPN route, pages long books of excuses don't cut it there either.  There really is no pleasant way to get this fact across to you.

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72 Visitors; 11 Posts

Nursing is a tough profession, and you need to have tough skin. If your instructor truly was giving you a hard time and singled you out, then that is simply not okay. However, it has happened, and now it is up to you to decide how you respond. You have gotten some good advice. If you are positive you want to continue with nursing, apply to every nursing school that you can reasonably drive to and attend. What do you have to lose? If you get an interview or they ask about you failing out, be honest- but don't blame the school and your instructors. If you make a bunch of excuses, that will not go over well with the new school. Explain to them that your first semester was challenging and it obviously didn't go the way you had hoped, but you have learned from all of this and are ready to try again and have a plan for success. But at some point you need to take some ownership. Just because the advice is not what you wanted to hear, doesn't mean it isn't good advice. 

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ThatChickOmi has 1 years experience as a ADN, RN.

1,848 Visitors; 203 Posts

11 hours ago, Rionoir said:

At the end of the day, you need to take responsibility for your actions.  

It basically comes down to this. Remember, when you point a finger at someone else, three of your fingers are pointing back to yourself.

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Hoosier_RN has 20 years experience as a MSN and specializes in LTC, home health, hospice, ICU, ER, dialysis.

3 Followers; 2,739 Visitors; 1,359 Posts

I read the whole post, but come back to the beginning.  You say that you have an illness that makes you tired and sleepy/oversleep? You may not physically be able to do nursing. Not everyone can be a nurse just because they want to.  I'd ask the MD managing my illness if it is a realistic plan. Good luck, but you need to work on you to move forward...

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sirI has 30 years experience as a MSN, APRN, NP and specializes in Education, FP, LNC, Forensics, ED, OB.

14 Followers; 19 Articles; 136,466 Visitors; 13,037 Posts

Duplicate topics merged for continuity.

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