donating blood

Nurses General Nursing

Published

this am i went and gave blood at our local high school and thought it was VERY strange that no one wore gloves!!!! is this the usual practice at blood banks? i mean ,i know that if you get a needle stick gloves won't help but NO gloves? does any one know if this is standard procedure?

P_RN, ADN, RN

6,011 Posts

Specializes in ORTHOPAEDICS-CERTIFIED SINCE 89.

That sounds very risky for them. Was it a Red Cross drive or another blood bank? Either way they are doing themselves a disservice, not to mention totally ignoring the law.

How about calling the main office and ask to speak to their risk manager. That's a question that needs to be answered.

DeeDee71

39 Posts

I volunteer with our local red cross chapter. I know the blood bank workers here always wear gloves when they draw blood.

RN-PA, RN

626 Posts

Specializes in Med-Surg, Long Term Care.

I've been a blood donor for years and have never seen any of the workers without gloves. I would contact your local Red Cross chapter and tell them what you saw.

colleen10

1,326 Posts

We were recently discussing this in nursing class because a fellow student saw her husband have a blood sample taken and the phleb. didn't wear any gloves, so in class she asked my instructor about it.

My instructor said that she wears gloves everytime she comes into contact with a patient, except when she is starting an IV or drawing blood.

The reasoning? Because it is difficult to feel for and find a vein through gloves and the one time that she did wear gloves to start an IV was the one time that she got stuck because the gloves were getting in the way.

That's the only comment I can make since I have yet to draw blood or start IV's.

Long Term Care Columnist / Guide

VivaLasViejas, ASN, RN

108 Articles; 9,984 Posts

Specializes in LTC, assisted living, med-surg, psych.

I cut the thumb and forefinger off my dominant-hand glove when starting an IV for that very reason...I can't feel anything through the glove. I KNOW it's risky, but until they can make a glove which is ultra thin and fits like a second skin, I'll continue to do it this way. (Note: my hands never touch blood directly even with the cutouts, as I apply pressure over the cannulated vein while I attach the tubing to prevent blood from escaping.)

Students: this is an example of school vs. real life. Yes, we SHOULD wear gloves if there is even the remote chance of becoming contaminated with anything that's warm, wet, and not ours. And for the most part, we do. Even in the 10 years I've been in health care, I've seen compliance with standard precautions improve vastly, and that's a good thing. Just don't be shocked if you see the occasional nurse drawing blood or starting an IV without gloves....but try not to emulate us!

Students: this is NOT an example of school vs. real life. It is an example of disregarding the law and hospital policy and risks to yourself and others.

road runner2003

147 Posts

I also donate blood, every 3rd mth. Until recently I did not notice, or at least thought about it - I have not seen any of the nurses wear gloves except when checking haemoglobin levels prior to donation.

Donated 2 months ago and one of the nurses was about to apply pressure to the needle site (I happened to be a little faint) - instant reaction here. Saw the nurse had no gloves on, shocked by this - I immediately applied pressure MYSELF before the nurse did! With that said - the nurses do wear gloves when taking the blood away for storage . . . .

tonchitoRN

213 Posts

it is true that it is hard to feel veins through gloves. however, i have learned to stick people wearing gloves. believe me, i am good inserting iv's with the gloves. it just took a lot of practice. :p

Home Health Columnist / Guide

NRSKarenRN, BSN, RN

11 Articles; 18,062 Posts

Specializes in Vents, Telemetry, Home Care, Home infusion.

1970's, drew blood without gloves.

1985 started wearing gloves ANYTIME starting IV's/veinipuncture.

Just like riding a bicycle, practice, practice. practice till perfected.

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