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Does your employer charge you for PTO?

Nurses   (4,952 Views 98 Comments)

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1,193 Visitors; 88 Posts

Just now, klone said:

I know of no places in the US that offer maternity leave. You would likely need to move to Canada or Europe, or another place with socialized healthcare to find that.

Really ? Im not sure if it is different for nursing but i did have a paid maternity leave when i worked at an assisted living. It was not the best pay but i was still compensated. 

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MunoRN has 10 years experience as a RN and specializes in Critical Care.

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3 minutes ago, Lovethenurse2b25 said:

Tuition reimbursement 

Dental and Vision Insurance

Health Insurance with coverage for spouse or children

Paid holidays

Sick leaves

Paid-Time off (PTO)

Maternity Leaves

Pension plans

Life insurance 

Disability insurance 

Subsidized training for career growth

 

Your employer provides PTO, I think you're confusing the option to cash-out the PTO for meaning they are charging you if you don't chose to do that.  PTO pay is calculated as part of your total pay for all jobs, regardless of employer.

Same goes for health insurance, it's something that costs the employer and/or you a lot of money, it wouldn't make sense to expect a benefit that costs a lot of money without also expecting that to be offset with your hourly pay.

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klone has 13 years experience as a MSN, RN and specializes in Women's Health/OB Leadership.

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3 minutes ago, Lovethenurse2b25 said:

Really ? Im not sure if it is different for nursing but i did have a paid maternity leave when i worked at an assisted living. It was not the best pay but i was still compensated. 

Did you elect short-term disability?

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MunoRN has 10 years experience as a RN and specializes in Critical Care.

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8 minutes ago, Lovethenurse2b25 said:

Tuition reimbursement 

Dental and Vision Insurance

Health Insurance with coverage for spouse or children

Paid holidays

Sick leaves

Paid-Time off (PTO)

Maternity Leaves

Pension plans

Life insurance 

Disability insurance 

Subsidized training for career growth

 

Your employer provides PTO, I think you're confusing the option to cash-out the PTO for meaning they are charging you if you don't chose to do that.  PTO pay is calculated as part of your total pay for all jobs, regardless of employer.

You seem to be saying you want the same base pay you would get by opting out of PTO but with the PTO, maybe I'm misunderstanding.

 

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1 minute ago, MunoRN said:

Your employer provides PTO, I think you're confusing the option to cash-out the PTO for meaning they are charging you if you don't chose to do that.  PTO pay is calculated as part of your total pay for all jobs, regardless of employer.

Same goes for health insurance, it's something that costs the employer and/or you a lot of money, it wouldn't make sense to expect a benefit that costs a lot of money without also expecting that to be offset with your hourly pay.

If i take the pto option my hourly pay is $33.50 without it the pay is $35. Same goes for benefits. With both the pay decreases to $32. As stated before this was something i never heard of before. The purpose of this post was to gain insight from other nurses around the world to see if any else has heard of this option.

I also worked for a home care agency bayada as a chha the pay rate varied between cases depending on client needs but there was not a flat out dollar decrease in wage for pto. 

But on the bright side you learn something new everyday 😊

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4 minutes ago, klone said:

Did you elect short-term disability?

Paid Family Leave. The second maternity leave law in New Jersey is Paid Family Leave which was introduced in 2009 to amend the state's temporary disability law. It covers the mother for six or eight weeks of paid leave to care for herself and her baby following childbirth.

 

The NJFLI provides paid baby bonding benefits for both fathers and mothers. It replaces a portion of income for up to six weeks. Both the Federal FMLA and NJFLA provide unpaid baby bonding leave. They offer job and group health insurance protections for up to twelve weeks.

 

 

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10 minutes ago, Lovethenurse2b25 said:

Paid Family Leave. The second maternity leave law in New Jersey is Paid Family Leave which was introduced in 2009 to amend the state's temporary disability law. It covers the mother for six or eight weeks of paid leave to care for herself and her baby following childbirth.

 

The NJFLI provides paid baby bonding benefits for both fathers and mothers. It replaces a portion of income for up to six weeks. Both the Federal FMLA and NJFLA provide unpaid baby bonding leave. They offer job and group health insurance protections for up to twelve weeks.

 

 

This is not a company benefit.... it is a state insurance program that is paid for from deductions from your paycheck.

"A small amount of all NJ employee's paychecks is withheld from those making over a certain amount to pay for FLI benefits, which means these benefits are considered to be fully employee-funded."

https://www.upcounsel.com/nj-maternity-leave

 

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ThePrincessBride has 3 years experience and specializes in Med-Surg, NICU.

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5 hours ago, MunoRN said:

It sounds as though you have the option to still get a paycheck when you take time off by banking that money with the employer.  This probably isn't particularly useful to most people, unless you're the type of person who spends money as soon as you have it, this would ensure that you can still pay your bills if you take a couple of weeks off.

As for the benefits, there aren't many places left where the employer pays the full cost of benefits, typically what a job with benefits means these days is that you get to pay into the employer's group insurance plan, I pay $1200 per month for instance, and that's in addition to what my employer contributes.  

1200? That is outrageous. 

For medical, dental, vision and.disability, I pay $45 biweekly.

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Just now, ThePrincessBride said:

1200? That is outrageous. 

For medical, dental, vision and.disability, I pay $45 biweekly.

I would be willing to bet this is family coverage. 

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ThePrincessBride has 3 years experience and specializes in Med-Surg, NICU.

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Just now, 203bravo said:

I would be willing to bet this is family coverage. 

Still expensive! At my job, family is like less than 150 per paycheck.

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3 minutes ago, ThePrincessBride said:

Still expensive! At my job, family is like less than 150 per paycheck.

That's nice.... I pay around 30 biweekly for only single coverage health... no dental, no vision, no short term disability. 

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MunoRN has 10 years experience as a RN and specializes in Critical Care.

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43 minutes ago, Lovethenurse2b25 said:

If i take the pto option my hourly pay is $33.50 without it the pay is $35. Same goes for benefits. With both the pay decreases to $32. As stated before this was something i never heard of before. The purpose of this post was to gain insight from other nurses around the world to see if any else has heard of this option.

I also worked for a home care agency bayada as a chha the pay rate varied between cases depending on client needs but there was not a flat out dollar decrease in wage for pto. 

But on the bright side you learn something new everyday 😊

Your employer is going to figure out what overall compensation they need to provide to be competitive, that same compensation can then by given to you through a number of different ways; all direct compensation with no employer contributed benefits, or the employer may partly contribute to benefits which then decreases your 'cash' compensation, or the employer may completely pay for your benefits which then decreases your cash compensation even further.  But all of these provide you with the same compensation overall.  

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