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Do you ever contend with pesty ancillary staff?

Posted

Specializes in Critical Care, Float Pool Nursing. Has 5 years experience.

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Aurora77

Specializes in Med Surg. Has 4 years experience.

Our hospital has just started having the labs call "critical action values" to the providers instead of calling them to the nurse to have US call them to the providers. Half the time te "critical action values" weren't so critical. If someone's hemoglobin has been 8.2 every four hours for the past two days, how come it's suddenly "critical" now that it's 8.4?

!

That is a really good idea and a huge time saver when it comes to correcting those critical values.

Tenebrae, BSN, RN

Specializes in Mental Health, Gerontology, Palliative. Has 8 years experience.

One of the worst ever experiences was as a student nurse working on a busy surgical ward for my final placement prior to sitting states (NCLEX) exam and graduating. It was one of those shifts, you know, where you get all four patients back from theatre at the same time over the tea break all needing stuff done. Closely followed by the admission of a very agitated patient who has already fractured something from a fall and can not be left alone due to being a high falls risk and the soonest time they can get someone in for a watch is at 2300, approx 90 minutes away. Between the family and the nurses we managed to cover the watch.

I ended up sitting in their writing my notes when the nurse aide waltzed in. First complaint "why isnt the watch paper work completed, where is my lamp and chair?'. After fighting the urge to throw something, I managed to say in my sweetest and most neutral voice "gosh, I'm so sorry we didnt have that ready for you. Between the four patients coming back from theatre at the same time, all needing post op obs and other various nursing interventions, plus trying to help keep this patient calm and stop them from falling and sustaining other serious injuries, I guess we just ran out of time. Also, you see these folders? These are the patient notes I have not had a chance to write yet".

The nurse aid flounced off to get her paper work and chair. When she came back I proceeded to give her a handover about the patient and was told "I know what I'm doing thankyou, I've been doing this for along time and am very experienced". After picking up my jaw off the floor. Again using that nice level voice I said "I can appreciate your experience and its great to have you looking after this patient. Given the nature of their illness and \the fact that this patient has already fallen once while under our health boards care, I would like to ensure you have all the information so you can provide the best care for this patient possible"

I wondered if this was due to the fact that i was a student nurse and she somehow thought she could order me around. I did find as tempting as it is to give a rude or sarcastic reponse, the polite neutral voiced conversations tend to communicate the relevant issues far more effectively

This is one of the reasons why I love district nursing, no ancillary staff under my feet. Only have contact with other members of the healthcare team when its needed for best patient care.

RNdynamic

Specializes in Critical Care, Float Pool Nursing. Has 5 years experience.

Obtaining an illegal SSN to gain employment sounds like an illegal alien to me. Quite the assumption and ignorant.

Illegal immigrants come from various countries and races.. so I'm not seeing the racial component, sorry.

tokmom, BSN, RN

Specializes in Certified Med/Surg tele, and other stuff. Has 30 years experience.

Illegal immigrants come from various countries and races.. so I'm not seeing the racial component, sorry.

No, you wouldn't. It is an awful thing to say about someone. Who knows, maybe YOU are illegal.

But again, you post to fan flames, so these comments are typical.

icuRNmaggie, BSN, RN

Specializes in MICU, SICU, CICU. Has 24 years experience.

Why not just say:

It's okay if you give her one (blanket water phone ice cream) thanks :)

I agree that calls from the pharmacy about new orders , wrong dose, non formulary are kind of annoying.

I would love to say " Wouldn't be more efficient to call the doctor yourself?"

Edited by icuRNmaggie

vintage_RN, BSN, RN

Specializes in NICU. Has 6 years experience.

Yes...this. Once I had a new admission (walkie talkie lady who was pretty stable) and had another patient who had a lot going on, so I quickly admitted her, did vitals and an assessment...and I guess I forgot to give her her call bell. I was with my other patient and one of the cleaning staff was in the room and I hear very loudly and exaggerated in front of my other patients "Wow, good thing you didn't NEED anything! I'm glad SOMEONE came to help you" as she handed the patient the call bell while glaring at me....REALLY!?!!?!?!?!

Also OT/PT, residents...."your patient wants a blanket" "your patient wants water" "your patient had a BM, just so you know."

Usually I just thank them for letting me know and tell them where to get the requested item.

Ruby Vee, BSN

Specializes in CCU, SICU, CVSICU, Precepting & Teaching. Has 40 years experience.

Why not just say:

It's okay if you give her one (blanket water phone ice cream) thanks :)

I agree that calls from the pharmacy about new orders , wrong dose, non formulary are kind of annoying.

I would love to say " Wouldn't be more efficient to call the doctor yourself?"

I actually have said "Wouldn't it be better to just talk to the provider?" and given them the number. Now our hospital policy has changed: pharmacy calls the provider directly to answer questions about orders and lab calls the provider directly with "Critical Action Labs." YAY!

kanzi monkey

Has 5 years experience.

I want to work where you work. Most of the time when ancillary staff ask questions like this it's because they are too special to deal with it and they want you to leave what you're doing and look after that one little thing that they could have done so they won't feel guilty about not having done it.

This really doesn't make a whole lot of sense if you think for half a second about what THAT person may have on their own "to do" list (which you are not able to help with and they will not ask from you). We all have work to do and we all have to figure out how to manage our task flow. Every single person working in a hospital will be asked to do something that they aren't able to do right at that second. Write it down and get back to it, or delegate it to an appropriate person (or, if you are really in a pinch, ask someone who doesn't look busy if they can help you and be gracious about it).

icuRNmaggie, BSN, RN

Specializes in MICU, SICU, CICU. Has 24 years experience.

That response was not very gracious.

If you perceive yourself to be above providing a simple human need like water or slippers, don't be surprised when you find yourself all alone when you need help with your " tasks. "

I am so thankful that I work nights.

Edited by icuRNmaggie

kanzi monkey

Has 5 years experience.

How in the world was that not gracious? I am above nobody. But I am very busy when I am at work and I must prioritize my responsibilities over those which can be taken on by someone else (ie, writing admission orders vs getting someone tucked in-which, by the way, you can delegate too, if you are too busy).

And yes, I will do what I can to see that my patient is comfortable. Most people do this. It is absolutely inappropriate, however, for a nurse to suggest I do a task if I am telling her a patient needs something. If I am telling the nurse about it, that means I cannot do it myself.

If you want to insult me for not being gracious, or think that I am not a team player, so be it. I'm at work to take care of patients.