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Do you ever contend with pesty ancillary staff?

Posted

Specializes in Critical Care, Float Pool Nursing. Has 5 years experience.

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Karou

Specializes in Med-Surg. Has 1 years experience.

I agree with other posters who say we deal with this a lot less on nights. While sometimes I want the ancillary staff around, in general I am really grateful that they are not as present on my shift. This goes for management, attending physicians, social workers, case managers, RT, ect...

I miss them sometimes. Like when a patient needs to speak to dietary, I need to find out certain test schedule times (radiologist comes at 0800), someone has a question about billing, wants to see a patient advocate... And the list goes on. I always feel like I'm dumping on day shift when I tell the oncoming muse, "so and so needs this or that, but you need to discuss it with THIS person" (who isn't present on my shift).

The positives outweigh the negatives. I couldn't stand being approached every ten minutes by dietary, PT/OT, case manager, every single specialist on the patients case, ect... No thanks! I get that as the primary RN, we are the only person dedicated to the patient as a whole. However, we have 5 or 6 patients to take care of, and can't possibly be able to take all that input/questions from everyone else involved on their care.

The only non nursing staff who bug me at nights are the RT's, phlebotomists, and maybe unit secretary (until 21:00). I see them so rarely that usually instead of them bugging me with questions, I am more likely to be the one trying to hunt them down.

This reminds me of a time a few weeks ago when I was in a room with a new admission. I was performing incontinent care. To make a boring long story short, I had a physician open the door while I was in the room to ask me about another patient. Seriously? I get it that you are a doctor, but you aren't THIS patients doctor, and she is naked. The question the doc had? "How is so and so doing, any changes?"

Yes, I may occasionally miss having the resources/other staff that day shift has, but I am more than grateful to work on a quieter shift. :)

Respond with "I'll take it under advisement"

Begs the question if you are spending time looking for issues, then looking for me to discuss said issues, the issue could have been dealt with already, by you........

While it may be annoying, I just have one comment. Would it be more annoying for them to pop a blanket on top of your patient that FINALLY doesn't have a fever? Or if they decided to grab your NPO patient a glass of water? I guess it depends on their tone, but most of the time other staff asks something like that it is because they don't want to step on anyone's toes.

Ruby Vee, BSN

Specializes in CCU, SICU, CVSICU, Precepting & Teaching. Has 40 years experience.

While it may be annoying, I just have one comment. Would it be more annoying for them to pop a blanket on top of your patient that FINALLY doesn't have a fever? Or if they decided to grab your NPO patient a glass of water? I guess it depends on their tone, but most of the time other staff asks something like that it is because they don't want to step on anyone's toes.

I want to work where you work. Most of the time when ancillary staff ask questions like this it's because they are too special to deal with it and they want you to leave what you're doing and look after that one little thing that they could have done so they won't feel guilty about not having done it.

mmc51264, ADN, BSN, MSN, RN

Specializes in orthopedic; Informatics, diabetes. Has 8 years experience.

I have more trouble with the manipulative pts telling OT/PT or case managers that they need pain meds when they just had them.

I have more trouble with the manipulative pts telling OT/PT or case managers that they need pain meds when they just had them.

This happens all of the time! That plus asking for water when they know they have surgery >:(

It's also the reason our phlebotomists always ask, they know our patients ;) Because I work a fairly regular schedule, I see the same phlebotomists every night.

Because I work nights I also don't have as many ancillary staff as everyone on days. I would be most annoyed if it was like Ruby Vee said. Shirking off a task you know you can do, or worse, looking at you like you aren't taking good care of your patients.

mamagui

Specializes in Eventually Midwifery. Has 1+ years experience.

The funny thing is that the guy almost never speaks English except to bother the nurses, so I think he may have used someone else's SSN to have gotten employed.

I'd like very much to tell him to shut up and keep mopping.

Well that was a pretty hasty conclusion. So what you are saying is that people that speak languages other than English are committing fraud to obtain employment? You do live in America, right? Good lord...

"Pesty" as in an insect? I try to appreciate, and I kind of find the term ancillary offensive. Sounds dismissive/ diminutive. Would YOU like to be referred to as "a doctor's helper" ? :whistling: But I digress... I have had words with a physical therapist who thought pain pills were the only necessary meds. She was breathing down my neck as I got the AM pills (20 or so) for a patient and so I told her that I needed her to back off a bit. Need space to do MY job too.

RNdynamic

Specializes in Critical Care, Float Pool Nursing. Has 5 years experience.

Well that was a pretty hasty conclusion. So what you are saying is that people that speak languages other than English are committing fraud to obtain employment? You do live in America, right? Good lord...

America where an estimated 13 million illegals live? Yes.

sandyfeet

Specializes in Emergency Nursing. Has 5 years experience.

Ancillary is the correct term, because it means someone who provides support. It's not diminutive.

I had only one serious problem with an US tech in my two years so far as a nurse. I had a pregnant patient in police custody because she was using drugs and was arrested in the street. She also had a UTI and was receiving IV antibiotics. The US tech came to the bedside to verify the pregnancy and said the the police officer "They're giving a pregnant woman antibiotics? That's awful." She didn't realize that I was right outside of the room and heard everything. Now I would have walked into the room and said something to her face about the meth probably being worse for her fetus than a Category C antibiotic, but at the time I was too shy and new so I talked to my charge nurse and wrote an incident report. Luckily the patient was so out of it, she didn't hear anything. But I always wondered what the cop thought of me and my competency after hearing that comment.

mamagui

Specializes in Eventually Midwifery. Has 1+ years experience.

America where an estimated 13 million illegals live? Yes.

And there are 39 million LEGAL immigrants.

Your hasty conclusions and nasty comments about getting back to mopping come off as quite racist.

applewhitern, BSN, RN

Specializes in ICU. Has 30 years experience.

Oh, good grief. What is racist about saying the HOUSEKEEPER should mop the floor?

tokmom, BSN, RN

Specializes in Certified Med/Surg tele, and other stuff. Has 30 years experience.

Well that was a pretty hasty conclusion. So what you are saying is that people that speak languages other than English are committing fraud to obtain employment? You do live in America, right? Good lord...

This OP likes to rock the boat. Look at previous posts. Just sayin'

Edited by tokmom

tokmom, BSN, RN

Specializes in Certified Med/Surg tele, and other stuff. Has 30 years experience.

Oh, good grief. What is racist about saying the HOUSEKEEPER should mop the floor?

Obtaining an illegal SSN to gain employment sounds like an illegal alien to me. Quite the assumption and ignorant.

tokmom, BSN, RN

Specializes in Certified Med/Surg tele, and other stuff. Has 30 years experience.

Well OP, too bad you work where you do, but you would not fit in where I work with that attitude of calling people pesty. Imagine how your day would be without all these annoying people? Can you see yourself doing everything they do?

I love our ancillary staff. Even the RT will grab a blanket or ice water, AFTER they ask us if it's ok. I want to be bothered by CM because that means my patient is on the launching pad for a safe discharge. You should be grateful they exist.

Aurora77

Specializes in Med Surg. Has 4 years experience.

Most of the ancillary staff I work with are great. I work nights, so we all have to work together. I've had a phleb come and tell me how much urine he emptied out of a patient's urinal. Heck, I had a doc walk a patient back from the bathroom for me. It freaked me out, seeing him come out of her room (she wasn't his patient). When I asked if she was ok he replied "She said she needed someone to walk with her."

TriciaJ, RN

Specializes in Psych, Corrections, Med-Surg, Ambulatory. Has 39 years experience.

The hospital where I worked, pharmacy would NEVER call the Dr. themselves. They'd always call the nurse to say "That med doesn't come in that strength" or "It's contraindicated". They expected nurses to call the doctors for them because they didn't have time. (And I'd have to put down my magazine!) Unfortunately, management wouldn't back us and we got stuck playing go-between.

The transportation people were notorious for making fresh postops scoot themselves off the gurney and onto the bed. If I wasn't right there to insist we move the pt (and the slider sheets made it incredibly easy) I would find some poor person laboriously getting himself onto his bed without any help. I finally started writing them up.

So much for peeves. On a positive note: when I was orienting to my first med-surg job, I had a patient start vomiting just as I was emptying the foley bag. The PT walked in, dressed like she had just stepped out of a band box. I was desperately trying to reclamp the foley in a hurry. Without batting an eye, she grabbed a basin, held it for the patient, emptied it and tidied him up. All in the time it took me to clamp the foley bag. I was impressed. I told her I should really share my paycheque with her.

Ruby Vee, BSN

Specializes in CCU, SICU, CVSICU, Precepting & Teaching. Has 40 years experience.

The hospital where I worked, pharmacy would NEVER call the Dr. themselves. They'd always call the nurse to say "That med doesn't come in that strength" or "It's contraindicated". They expected nurses to call the doctors for them because they didn't have time. (And I'd have to put down my magazine!) Unfortunately, management wouldn't back us and we got stuck playing go-between.

The transportation people were notorious for making fresh postops scoot themselves off the gurney and onto the bed. If I wasn't right there to insist we move the pt (and the slider sheets made it incredibly easy) I would find some poor person laboriously getting himself onto his bed without any help. I finally started writing them up.

So much for peeves. On a positive note: when I was orienting to my first med-surg job, I had a patient start vomiting just as I was emptying the foley bag. The PT walked in, dressed like she had just stepped out of a band box. I was desperately trying to reclamp the foley in a hurry. Without batting an eye, she grabbed a basin, held it for the patient, emptied it and tidied him up. All in the time it took me to clamp the foley bag. I was impressed. I told her I should really share my paycheque with her.

Our hospital has just started having the labs call "critical action values" to the providers instead of calling them to the nurse to have US call them to the providers. Half the time te "critical action values" weren't so critical. If someone's hemoglobin has been 8.2 every four hours for the past two days, how come it's suddenly "critical" now that it's 8.4?

Now if I could just get the pharmacy to call at all when there's a problem with the med order . . . rather than just ignoring it and not doing anything . . . I'd be a happy camper!