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Discrimination Against ER Nurses?

Job Assistance   (10,986 Views | 75 Replies)
by DaveBSN DaveBSN (Member)

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You are reading page 3 of Discrimination Against ER Nurses?. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

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Even Forbes and WSJ are finally admitting there may be no shortage- see post above your last post!

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itsmejuli specializes in Home Care.

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I don't see anybody being vindictive or laughing at you.

It's unfortunate that you've only recently found AN and all the current information we have on the sad state of nursing employment.

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sjalv has 1 years experience and specializes in CVICU.

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I don't see anybody being vindictive or laughing at you.

I do. Well, the follow statements could be interpreted as being snarky and rudely sarcastic. I've seen people get chewed out here for less. The OP isn't some ditzy new grad whining 'cause she can't get her "dreeeeeeeam job". He presented a well laid out account of his situation and has yet to get hostile with anyone here, so I don't see the need for some people to be negative.

From what you've written I can see a few reasons why you've not been hired.

(You're joking, right?? Do you actually believe there's a "massive" shortage?)

According to reality, that is not correct.

Read through the forums here on AN and you'll find your reality check.

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LadyFree28 has 10 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Pediatrics, Rehab, Trauma.

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I do. Well, the follow statements could be interpreted as being snarky and rudely sarcastic. I've seen people get chewed out here for less. The OP isn't some ditzy new grad whining 'cause she can't get her "dreeeeeeeam job". He presented a well laid out account of his situation and has yet to get hostile with anyone here, so I don't see the need for some people to be negative.

Stating that someone is incorrect is not "snarky". :no:

Stating facts of what is really going on may be jarring, however, the FACTS remain what they are; you can't argue against facts.

Unfortunately, the OP is in a position where their work history and the surplus of nurses is working against him; arguing about a false nursing shortage when it is not so isn't doing him currently any favors is not going to get any traction, when the results are otherwise; being sensitive to that fact when it's reality, while people are informing him, while understandable based on the situation; doesn't give the OP liberty to "read into tone", especially since the information present to him is factual and to the point, and for HIS benefit, then because he reads what he doesn't want to hear to paint the "nurses are supposed to be compassionate" speech. :blink:

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Esme12 is a ASN, BSN, RN and specializes in Critical Care, ED, Cath lab, CTPAC,Trauma.

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Seems like there are some really vindictive nurses commenting on this post. If you're just going to laugh at me, there's no need to post. Nurses are supposed to be compassionate, not laughing at others expense or trying to tear someone down.

Oh Dave....I am so sorry you are experiencing this...the fact is...there is NO nursing shortage... Browse the Nursing Career Advice The ANA is not being truthful.

Many of states are experiencing a surplus and California has a 47% employment rate of nurses especially new grads. Unfortunately, contrary to what is being advertised...... there is at present no shortage. Many new grads cannot find jobs and the seasoned nurses laid off because of "downsizing" are not being hired because of their "high" rate of pay.

The Big Lie

without a doubt, the main source of frustration experienced by recently graduated and licensed but still unemployed nurses is what could be called "the big lie."in other words, the television commercials that encourage young people to become nurses -- and then abandon them for months (or years) without employment; and the educators who tell them that the associate's degree is perfectly adequate to guarantee employment, that they will have their pick of jobs when they graduate, and that there is plenty of time to get a bsn later on. who knows whether it is greed, ignorance, or wishful thinking that underlies the fairy tales told to nursing students about their future job prospects? whatever the motivation, the disillusionment of our new grads is palpable. the jobs they expected after all of their hard work just haven't materialized, and some grads are getting pretty desperate.

will work for experience

the strongest motivator for the working population is money, but for some newly licensed registered nurses, getting valuable clinical experience seems to be taking precedence over the paycheck. without that experience, the financial future of these nurses will remain precarious because they will be unable to find jobs.

"i am willing to take a 50% pay cut or even work for free so i can get the darned experience," said one frustrated new graduate who has been unable to break out of the unending cycle of "no job without experience, and no experience without a job."

she was not alone. other readers wrote:...........for the rest of the article, medscape requires registration but it is free.

medscape: medscape access

has the nursing shortage disappeared?

it's that time of year again. graduating nursing students are preparing to take the nclex and are looking for their first jobs. this year, many are finding those first jobs in short supply. reports are rampant of new graduates being unable to find open positions in their specialty of choice, and even more shockingly, many are finding it tough to find any openings at all.

these new rns entered school with the promise that nursing is a recession-proof career. they were told the nursing shortage would guarantee them employment whenever and wherever they wanted.

so what happened? has the nursing shortage—that we've heard about incessantly for years—suddenly gone away?

the short term answer is clearly yes, although in the long term, unfortunately, the shortage will still be there.

the recession has brought a temporary reprieve to the shortage. nurses who were close to retirement have seen their 401(k) portfolios plummet and their potential retirement income decline. they are postponing retirement a few more years until the economy—and their portfolios—pick up.

many nurses have seen their spouses and partners lose their jobs and have increased their hours to make ends meet for their families. some who left the profession to care for children or for other reasons have rejoined the workforce for similar reasons.

in addition, many hospitals are not hiring. the recession brought hiring freezes to healthcare facilities across the country, and many are still in effect. help wanted ads for healthcare professionals dropped by 18,400 listings in july, even as the overall economy saw a modest increase of 139,200 in online job listings.

http://www.healthleadersmedia.com/co...sappeared.html

looking out for our new nurse grads

be a nurse if you can

a popular website about the nursing profession claims, "there has never been a better time to be a nurse." "be" a nurse? perhaps, but "become" a nurse? perhaps, that is less certain. in spite of continuing to rank among the best careers and best jobs in america, the nursing profession is struggling to welcome its newest members with open arms and paychecks.

not too long ago, the threat of a growing nursing shortage prompted thousands of prospective students to choose nursing as a career, and nursing schools rapidly filled to capacity. nursing was frequently referred to as a "recession-proof" career, and the outlook for finding a job after graduation was rosy.

experience and employment: the vicious cycle

now, the bloom, as they say, is off the rose. it seems that many of our new grads are stuck in that perennial dilemma: they can't get a job without experience, and they can't get experience without a job. this situation was not anticipated by thousands of nursing students who were told, often repeatedly, that a global nursing shortage practically guaranteed employment for them.

consider, for example, the situation faced by new graduates in california. a survey of hospitals by the california institute for nursing & health care found that as many as 40% of new graduates may not be able to find jobs in california hospitals, because only 65% of the state's potential employers were hiring new graduates and generally planned to hire fewer new graduates than in previous years. overwhelming numbers of new graduates submitted applications for the few available positions for new graduates.

what happened to the jobs?

most experts blame the crumbling economy for ruining the job prospects of new graduate nurses around the country, but as usual these days, the truth is more complex.

uneven distribution. the demand for nurses was supposed to exceed the supply by the year 2010. the question of whether we truly have a nursing shortage right now is a fair one. the answer, it seems, is "it depends." apparently, it depends on where you live and where you are willing to work. neither the distribution or supply of nurses, or the demand, is uniform. some geographic (mostly rural) areas have a shortage of nurses, whereas some urban locations are witnessing an oversupply of nurses. new graduates seeking jobs in these regions will face a very competitive job market.

economic recession. the shrinking job pool is widely believed to be a consequence of the declining us economy. temporarily at least, economic pressures and job losses in all industries have induced thousands of experienced but aging nurses to forego retirement and even increase their working hours to support their families. according to buerhaus, more than 75% of new nursing jobs between 2001 and 2008 were filled by nurses over the age of 50.[

 

combined with a lower hospital census (as a result of fewer elective procedures and loss of health insurance coverage), this has led to downsizing, hiring freezes, and even hospital closures. when the cash flow diminishes, hospitals traditionally look to cut the nursing budget, the highest cost center in the hospital. the most expensive item in that budget is orienting and training the new graduate. transitional programs for new graduates, such as internships and residency programs, have been sharply curtailed, and many hospitals stopped interviewing new grads altogether. it doesn't help that newly licensed nurses have a reputation for having the highest turnover rates. as many as 26% of new nurses leave their first nursing employer within 2 years.

shifting settings of care. healthcare is largely moving out of the hospital and into community-based settings. job growth for rns is expected but not necessarily in the hospital. significant job growth will occur in nursing homes, long-term care, home health, and even physicians' offices. acute care hospital job growth will be the slowed.

http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/744221 again medscape requires registration

Edited by Esme12

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Esme12 is a ASN, BSN, RN and specializes in Critical Care, ED, Cath lab, CTPAC,Trauma.

5 Followers; 4 Articles; 20,908 Posts; 147,372 Profile Views

Since the recession, health care has been the single biggest sector for job growth, but that doesn't mean it's easy to get hired.

 

Registered nurses fresh out of school are coming across thousands of job postings with an impossible requirement: "no new grads."

 

It's a problem well documented by the nursing industry. About 43% of newly licensed RNs still do not have jobs within 18 months after graduation, according to a survey conducted by the American Society of Registered Nurses.

New grads have taken to posting their frustrations on
allnurses.com
, a social network for nurses.

FULL ARTICLE: For Nursing Jobs, new grads need not apply

A slideshow of nurses and their struggles:

  1. Where's this so called shortage?
  2. Nursing jobs post "no new grads"
  3. If only I could get an in-person interview
  4. Dear Obama, Please help the nurses!
  5. Even with experience, I can't find work
  6. I want to make a difference
  7. Online applications are rejected instantly
  8. I can only find part-time work
  9. We're competing with thousands

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24 Posts; 1,270 Profile Views

I think it's the way things are being stated that's most important to recognize. We nurses are equipped with empathy (let's hope) and each nurse that has made a comment that sjalv noted above knew they weren't being anything but sarcastic and/or antagonistic. This would include the "guide" who seems to think that I need a reality check instead of showing empathy and understanding.

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Esme12 is a ASN, BSN, RN and specializes in Critical Care, ED, Cath lab, CTPAC,Trauma.

5 Followers; 4 Articles; 20,908 Posts; 147,372 Profile Views

I think it's the way things are being stated that's most important to recognize. We nurses are equipped with empathy (let's hope) and each nurse that has made a comment that sjalv noted above knew they weren't being anything but sarcastic and/or antagonistic. This would include the "guide" who seems to think that I need a reality check instead of showing empathy and understanding.
I already said that I am sorry. IN their defense you weren't listening to what was being said......The job market stinks right now. Your frequency that you have moved jobs looks bad on paper. It is the harsh reality right now. Visit this thread.....https://allnurses.com/nursing-career-advice/nursing-shortage-expiration-903977-page3.html

"Let me never fall into the vulgar mistake of dreaming that I am persecuted whenever I am contradicted" Ralph Waldo Emerson

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RescueNinjaKy has 3 years experience and specializes in Cath/EP lab, CCU, Cardiac stepdown.

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Nurses are indeed equipped with empathy but let's not forget that you're not their patient and that all nurses is a public forum. I applaud you for calling out those who have been rude but do not think that people who disagree with you are being antagonistic. A public forum is a place where people can share their thoughts and opinions.

You stated that there is a nursing shortage, others disagreed and posted sources (like esme). This doesn't make them "mean" or nasty. While I can't speak for the others, esme has been a tremendous resource and seems to be super nice/helpful.

People may think that all nurses is like a support group but the truth is it's not. You CAN find support here but you are more likely to find opposing opinions.

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RescueNinjaKy has 3 years experience and specializes in Cath/EP lab, CCU, Cardiac stepdown.

593 Posts; 8,932 Profile Views

And as for the other posters, let's try to respectfully disagree. You can state your beliefs or facts but let those speak for themselves rather than presenting it in a distasteful or disrespectful manner

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DatMurse has 3 years experience and specializes in Hematology/Oncology.

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We technically should have more working nurses at a time(IMO), but hospitals arent going to pay for that.

I think it's the way things are being stated that's most important to recognize. We nurses are equipped with empathy (let's hope) and each nurse that has made a comment that sjalv noted above knew they weren't being anything but sarcastic and/or antagonistic. This would include the "guide" who seems to think that I need a reality check instead of showing empathy and understanding.

It's called tough love.

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Rose_Queen is a BSN, MSN, RN and specializes in OR, education.

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So my question is, "Am I being discriminated against?"

Short answer: No, as ER nurses are not a protected class.

Long answer: Unfortunately, we have entered an era of the employer's market. Long gone are the days of a nursing shortage where sign on bonuses and relocation assistance were the norm; now, those "perks" should throw up red flags as a facility that is having trouble keeping nurses for one reason or another. Positions that are posted may have no intention of being filled- currently, my facility is listing about 6 or 7 jobs for my department. There is absolutely zero intent to fill any positions at this point. However, if those positions aren't posted, we can't keep them- they will disappear into the great abyss never to be seen again. But by making a show of posting the job and interviewing applicants, those positions will be open indefinitely until the unit management decides that we really do need another body. And, employers can be picky. That preferred qualification section? Yeah, maybe not necessary but a great way to weed out those who don't have the experience on that particular type of unit who just might need a bit more orientation than a nurse who doesn't have that experience. Also, the three jobs within 2 years is going to throw up red flags for the employer- if you can't stick it out at a job for a full year, how would the facility make a return on their investment? Welcome to health care, where patient care takes a backseat to the almighty dollar.

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