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claustrophobia and hospital

Posted

hi so I'm a hospital clerk.and theres one thing bothering me..that is sometimes I have to use the elevators to go to medical records..unfortunately I suffer from claustrophobia and elevators makes me feel very ill....is it ok to tell head of department about my condition maybe a careworker might help me by coming with me''/?

:unsure:

mrsboots87

Specializes in Neuro, Telemetry. Has 5 years experience.

If you have supportive management, then yes, tell them so they may try to accommodate you. Even if you don't, you should probably still tell them, but they may be less than helpful. In either case, you cantrol this so may as well try and make it easier in yourself.

Dumb question, but is there not an accessible stairwell you can use, or is that just as bad?

Atl-Murse

Has 1 years experience.

I cant imagine any manager would pay someone to babysit you up the elevator. Take the stairs, they say it's good for your health.

Been there,done that, ASN, RN

Has 33 years experience.

You have come across elevators many times in your life. Hospital elevators are no different than any others.

Why are you expecting special treatment now? No one has time to escort you. Either take the stairs or find a job without elevators in the building.

I recommend you seek professional help for this problem. They may be able to help you overcome it completely. Find someone who specializes in anxiety disorders and phobias.

Good luck.

Sour Lemon

Has 9 years experience.

hi so I'm a hospital clerk.and theres one thing bothering me..that is sometimes I have to use the elevators to go to medical records..unfortunately I suffer from claustrophobia and elevators makes me feel very ill....is it ok to tell head of department about my condition maybe a careworker might help me by coming with me''/?

:unsure:

It's not reasonable to expect an employer to accommodate every discomfort we have as individuals. I have some quirky aversions to materials encountered at work (and elsewhere). When encountered, they sometimes make me so tense that I get an instant migraine headache. I work around it when I can, but otherwise, I just have to deal with it.

Here.I.Stand, BSN, RN

Specializes in SICU, trauma, neuro. Has 16 years experience.

It's not reasonable to expect an employer to accommodate every discomfort we have as individuals. I have some quirky aversions to materials encountered at work (and elsewhere). When encountered, they sometimes make me so tense that I get an instant migraine headache. I work around it when I can, but otherwise, I just have to deal with it.

Right... I am not unsympathetic-- my 14 yr old daughter gets claustrophobic too.

However, all "care workers" (I assume nurses and CNAs?) are extremely busy with their own workload, perhaps not even have time to eat lunch. They can't be expected to comfort you in the elevator.

Take the stairs.

Rose_Queen, BSN, MSN, RN

Specializes in OR, education. Has 15 years experience.

Employers are only required to provide reasonable accommodations, and that is based on documented need. They are not going to pay someone to have enough time to ride the elevator with you, nor is it appropriate to expect someone else to leave their own work to ride an elevator with you. Building codes are going to require stairs in addition to the elevators. Use the stairs, elevator problem solved. That's a reasonable accommodation.

I once worked (very briefly) with a nurse who got a job in the OR. She "forgot" to mention her claustrophobia meant she couldn't wear a mask. She assumed she would be able to simply work in the OR without one. Um, no. That's a risk to patient safety due to infection concerns and a risk to herself in the case of body fluid splashes. Not a reasonable accommodation. What was a reasonable accommodation? Working in a unit where masks aren't required. She got booted out of the OR before the end of her first day.

Edited by Rose_Queen

brownbook

Has 35 years experience.

I am starting to think more and more posts are trolls.

How does it make any sense if you have claustrophobia that a co-worker would be of any help?????? Unless they were a trained mental health/behaviorist who could "talk" you through your claustrophobic "attack", for lack of a better word? I would think an empty elevator would lessen the feeling of claustrophobia, not one filled with people?

If I have to pick a "phobia" I could pick claustrophobia....I do prefer stairs to elevators.

I once worked (very briefly) with a nurse who got a job in the OR. She "forgot" to mention her claustrophobia meant she couldn't wear a mask. She assumed she would be able to simply work in the OR without one. Um, no. That's a risk to patient safety due to infection concerns and a risk to herself in the case of body fluid splashes. Not a reasonable accommodation. What was a reasonable accommodation? Working in a unit where masks aren't required. She got booted out of the OR before the end of her first day.

Oh good grief. Things that just make you shake your head...

nursej22, MSN, RN

Specializes in med/surg,CV. Has 30 years experience.

I do not like elevators, and take the stairs as often as is practical. If they really bother you, talk to a professional about this. You may have an EAP that can help.