Jump to content

Can you lose your CNA license for job abandonment?

CNA/MA   (48,039 Views | 16 Replies)
by Pj1975 Pj1975 (New) New

653 Profile Views; 1 Post

I work in medsurg tele with 24 patients. Usually the floor staff with 4 nurses and 2 tech. Our unit is super busy considering that we are on surgical floor . On top of that we had 400lbs maximum/total patient who requires 6 -7 people to turn for dressing change. I was working on my third day when we were short staff. The minute i found out i was the only tech for 24 pt i walked out and stated im quitting. First i was worried for my safety. Am i going to function well knowing that i have 24 patients. And this is not thefirst time it happen. Not surehow they pass with The Joint Commission. My manager told me i could lose my CNA liscence for job abandonment.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

VivaLasViejas has 20 years experience as a ASN, RN and specializes in LTC, assisted living, med-surg, psych.

8 Followers; 142 Articles; 9,739 Posts; 250,170 Profile Views

If you clocked in for your shift, then yes, technically you walked out on your job and can be fired. Often facilities will report this to the Board of Nursing as well. I'm sorry, but the BON takes these matters very seriously and you may face sanctions if your manager does report you.

In the future---assuming you keep your certification---if you feel an assignment is unsafe, TELL YOUR MANAGER. Don't just throw up your hands and quit. Not only will you be ineligible for rehire, but word gets around and it may be difficult, if not impossible, to find another job. Best of luck.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Pangea Reunited has 6 years experience as a ASN, RN.

1,547 Posts; 21,454 Profile Views

Since you were not ultimately responsible for the patients as an assistant, I don't see how this is abandonment. It is quitting without notice, though, and it does look bad.

I'm under the impression that CNAs don't have an actual "license", but I could be wrong...

It might have been better to do the best you could do under the circumstances and put in your two weeks notice after finding a new job.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

556 Posts; 8,801 Profile Views

Patient abandoment. Yes, you can lose your license over this.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

TheCommuter has 10 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Case mgmt., rehab, (CRRN), LTC & psych.

2 Followers; 228 Articles; 27,607 Posts; 319,019 Profile Views

Pangea Reunited said:
I'm under the impression that CNAs don't have an actual "license", but I could be wrong...

In some states, such as New Hampshire, CNAs have occupational licensure and are called licensed nursing assistants (LNAs).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

367 Posts; 9,522 Profile Views

As others have said, if you clocked in even if you hadn't taken report they can report you for abandonment and you can loose your license/certification.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

118 Posts; 3,396 Profile Views

Yes, you can. It is considered abandonment by law.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

strawberryluv is a BSN, RN and specializes in LTC, Med-surg.

743 Posts; 11,835 Profile Views

That's a tough one. I was once asked if I would do a double at my job. 3 hours in my first shift I changed my mind. I gave them five hours until my shift was over but they still couldn't find anybody. I uped and left. I don't think it was job abandonment in my case since my shift was already over and I gave them ample time to find my replacement AND told them I was not going to do the assignment.

But if you clocked in and then proceed to leave then I think its job abandonment.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

3 Followers; 37,151 Posts; 98,930 Profile Views

Patient abandonment perhaps, job abandonment no. Depends upon whether or not you left the job before or after accepting your assignment. Could be a fine line here. Best to seek the advice of an employment attorney should you be notified of Board action.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Glycerine82 has 4 years experience as a ASN, LPN and specializes in SNF/Rehab/Geri.

1 Article; 2,063 Posts; 26,267 Profile Views

Like the above poster said, it depends on whether you had accepted the assignment or not. It sounds like you didn't accept the assignment, because you left upon finding out that you were alone.

Had the other CNA left already? Did you inform someone you were leaving? They can take your certification away for abandonment, yes.

However, even if they HAD left, it's not really abandonment unless you didn't inform the nurses you were leaving, because ultimately they're the ones who are responsible for the patients. It can also be abandonment if there weren't enough nurses/aides to care for the patients based on any state ratio law.

i think a better way to have handled it would have been to call your supervisor, explain the situation and use the words "Not safe", etc.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Angeljho is a MSN, NP and specializes in Mental Health Nursing.

387 Posts; 8,393 Profile Views

CNAs have a license?

Like others have stated, if you signed/clocked in, it can be considered patient abandonment. In these cases, it is best to do your shift and then simply quit afterwards.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

92 Posts; 3,065 Profile Views

newboy said:
CNAs have a license?

Like others have stated, if you signed/clocked in, it can be considered patient abandonment. In these cases, it is best to do your shift and then simply quit afterwards.

Well in my state we are licensed and have to renew our license every two years. However it is my understanding that if you accepted a patient then it would be patient abandonment.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
×

This site uses cookies. By using this site, you consent to the placement of these cookies. Read our Privacy, Cookies, and Terms of Service Policies to learn more.