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Can I find employment at my age??

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I will be graduating from the ADN program in the spring of 2006. I will be 42 at that time. Will it be difficult to find a nursing job at that age?? Are hospitals reluctant to hire someone at this age?

I will be graduating from the ADN program in the spring of 2006. I will be 42 at that time. Will it be difficult to find a nursing job at that age?? Are hospitals reluctant to hire someone at this age?

no.

snowfreeze, BSN, RN

Specializes in ICU, CCU, Trauma, neuro, Geriatrics. Has 16 years experience.

You will be welcomed in many areas of health care.

ERNurse752, RN

Has 8 years experience.

Most places will just care that you have a license and a pulse, hehe. Good luck with your last year of school! :D

I will be graduating from the ADN program in the spring of 2006. I will be 42 at that time. Will it be difficult to find a nursing job at that age?? Are hospitals reluctant to hire someone at this age?

I was really worried about that too.... but have been reassured that there is a need for us "oldies" too.:chuckle

I'm 45 and in my last semester of pre-req's so I stil have a ways to go.

Congrats on your upcoming graduation!!!

Hugs!

MaryRose

Dixielee, BSN, RN

Specializes in ER. Has 38 years experience.

:chuckle Do you own your own stethescope? Can you continue to breathe regularly thru the entire shift? Can you hold your bladder for 8-12 hours? Can you survive on caffeine and chocolate?

If you answered yes to all of the above questions, hold a valid RN licence in the country of your choice, then yes, you can be employed.

I certainly hope so anyway, cause I am 10 years older than you and work as many shifts as I want to!

caroladybelle, BSN, RN

Specializes in Oncology/Haemetology/HIV.

I will be graduating from the ADN program in the spring of 2006. I will be 42 at that time. Will it be difficult to find a nursing job at that age?? Are hospitals reluctant to hire someone at this age?

I am 40. And I receive 5-7 offers in the mail per week...as well as 2-3 phone calls...and I am not even looking.

Tweety, BSN, RN

Specializes in Med-Surg, Trauma, Ortho, Neuro, Cardiac. Has 28 years experience.

Good luck. Dito the above 40 is not too old to get a job. You've 25 or so more good working years left, age isn't going to be a factor.

Sometimes your age/life experience can work for you. I was hired 2 years ago in my present job at age 48. And now sometimes I'm asked to be relief if the supervisor goes to meetings, etc. in case employee or parent situations arise that call for a "Mom" figure...

truern

Specializes in Telemetry & Obs.

I sure hope so...I'll be 51 the month I graduate :chuckle

Guess I need to work on the bladder control, though :p

traumaRUs, MSN, APRN, CNS

Specializes in Nephrology, Cardiology, ER, ICU. Has 27 years experience.

You all will be welcomed and thanks for being nurses!

Havin' A Party!, ASN, RN

Specializes in ICU, CM, Geriatrics, Management. Has 10 years experience.

In two words, "absolutely yes!"

BTW, we have a student graduating from our school this June who's over 60.

Doesn't it depend on the state you live in? I live in Colorado, and I hear no one wants new nurses - just those with experience. I'm 44, and I won't graduate until I'm 45. This course work is very intense. I'm thinking that if you live in a state where the "crisis" isn't as bad, the openings for new nurses will go to the younger crowd. Of course, no one will say that, it will just happen. I'm really worried about it.

I will be graduating from the ADN program in the spring of 2006. I will be 42 at that time. Will it be difficult to find a nursing job at that age?? Are hospitals reluctant to hire someone at this age?

I read not to long ago that the average age for practicing nurses (here in Ohio) is 50!

hehehe you are still a baby!

My dad graduated nursing school at age 52, and just started his 3rd nursing job. He hasn't had a problem getting a job due to his age at all!

and I'm looking for advice about pitfalls in this type of training. My work history is not good BUT I now work with an emotionally disturbed family and after a whole lifetime of searching, feel that I've found my niche. I also have a BA in psychology. So, assuming I complete the CNA program successfully, can I even dare to hope for a group-home type job requiring psych/social work saavy and some medical knowledge? I'm so concerned about doing the right thing now, after a lifetime of blind alleys and doors slamming in my face. My strongest asset is the knowledge of what it feels like to be hurt by a world which doesn't tolerate personal problems, insecurities, etc. I have grown in wisdom as a result of this...and I want a future which respects human imperfection and will not reject me out of hand...due to my own.....

:chuckle Do you own your own stethescope? Can you continue to breathe regularly thru the entire shift? Can you hold your bladder for 8-12 hours? Can you survive on caffeine and chocolate?

If you answered yes to all of the above questions, hold a valid RN licence in the country of your choice, then yes, you can be employed.

I certainly hope so anyway, cause I am 10 years older than you and work as many shifts as I want to!

Dixielee, BSN, RN

Specializes in ER. Has 38 years experience.

You may get more replies if you post this as a separate question. You sound like you really need some sound advice. As long as your background does not involve criminal activity, I don't see why you could not find something that will fulfill your current needs. Home health has a great need for good home health aids. I don't know what is involved in becoming a "psych tech", but we have them in our ER who help monitor suicidal patients, or ones who are not competant to be left alone. I am sure there are group home settings, especially in the elderly population who need good folks to help out.

I think you may be onto something. I will offer one word of warning though. Do not going into something like this if you are expecting it to fill all of your own needs. Caring for other people can be emotionally draining. You have to learn to take care of yourself first, before you can be beneficial to anyone else. Don't expect anyone to even be appreciative of what you are doing for them. They may not be able to express that themselves. There are plenty of opportunities to be helpful out there, just be sure to protect yourself first.

What a caring, encouraging remark to leave someone. Have a nice day, too!

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