Can I ask to work exclusively day shifts?

Published

I am going to start my nursing program in the fall. I know down the road I will be applying for my first nursing job, but I am a single mom. Normally, I wouldn't be picky about my work schedule, and I would just take what I can get-- especially on a new job. But my daughter will be about 3 when that time roles around, and I highly doubt I can work night shifts, 3p-3a, 7p-7a, or have a crazy schedule where I have a night shift and then a day shift.... Can I ask for exclusively day shifts since I am a single mom? I don't care what days during the week I get. I don't want to come off like I think I'm entitled to day shifts... What can I do?

P.S. I know a lot of single moms do work night shifts, but I don't have the support system to do so.

You can ask for whatever you want but a few things to consider,

Why are you going into a field that is known to have round the clock shifts and ask for special treatment?

Who do you think should work the evening and night shifts? The experienced, long term employees?

As a seasoned employee whose kids are older I do try to help out any coworker with younger children but I would have a hard time with any new employee who expected what has taken me years of night shifts to obtain.

OldDude

1 Article; 4,787 Posts

Specializes in Pediatrics Retired.

I'm not sure what it is you are seeking here. Your employability a few years in the future can't be predicted under the best of circumstances. Add those kind of restrictions and it's even harder to predict.

Specializes in med-surg, IMC, school nursing, NICU. Has 11 years experience.

It depends on the hospital policy. My first job was straight days or straight nights. You interviewed for a certain shift and that's the shift for which you were hired. Day shift positions were a little more scarce, since night shifters were usually given first dibs on them before they were available to external candidates. They are out there, though. You just have to look.

When I moved to MD, I found that every hospital in the area had either full time nights or day/night rotating. There are no full time day jobs that I have seen and I understand lots of places are like that. I don't know where you are located but depending on where you are in the world, it may be harder to find FT days positions. If day shifts are that important to you, you may want to considering researching some markets where FT days are available and relocating if necessary. ANYTHING is better than rotating, trust me.

I hope this helped. Good luck.

Has 6 years experience.

Of course you can ask, but they might say no. You might also find yourself working on Christmas, Easter, etc. Having a child does not entitle you to any special treatment ...but the more you have to offer and the more they need you, the more they'll be willing to negotiate.

kassiahgp

32 Posts

Like I said, I AM NOT entitled to day shifts simply because I have a child. I am just curious how it works. I like to know ahead of time because different departments/ specialties are going to have different availability in schedules. I am not asking for special treatment, I'm trying to understand what is appropriate to ask for schedule-wise. Thank you all for your input! I worked as a CNA and I understand how 12 hour shifts work and rotating schedule. I never asked for day shift because the seasoned CNAs deserved them more than I did.

roser13, ASN, RN

6,504 Posts

Specializes in Med/Surg, Ortho, ASC. Has 17 years experience.

We can't predict the future, but at this point in time, most areas of the US are saturated with new grads who cannot find employment. We hear from folks who have looked for 2, 3 years and have sent out thousands of resumes with no luck. I'm hoping that you're aware of the current situation in nursing and have taken that into consideration as you enter nursing school.

Shagce1

200 Posts

I would worry right now about getting through nursing school. Find some supports for you and your child. You may need them when clinicals start as they can sometimes have crazy hours. Maybe while you are in nursing school you will develop a network of people who can continue to help you with daycare once you graduate and find a job. I am not trying to sound cold, but you may be putting the cart before the horse. Just focus on one week to the next. I wouldn't worry about a couple of years down the road yet. And as a side note clinics generally have daytime only hours so that might be an option for you once you graduate.

DreamerMW

71 Posts

I am going to start my nursing program in the fall. I know down the road I will be applying for my first nursing job, but I am a single mom. Normally, I wouldn't be picky about my work schedule, and I would just take what I can get-- especially on a new job. But my daughter will be about 3 when that time roles around, and I highly doubt I can work night shifts, 3p-3a, 7p-7a, or have a crazy schedule where I have a night shift and then a day shift.... Can I ask for exclusively day shifts since I am a single mom? I don't care what days during the week I get. I don't want to come off like I think I'm entitled to day shifts... What can I do?

P.S. I know a lot of single moms do work night shifts, but I don't have the support system to do so.

I'm sorry for all the unasked-for opinions and negativity that some previous posters offered. And to answer your question, yes, days- only jobs absolutely exist. They are many hospitals who even offer 8-4 and such (one that comes to mind is CHOP). And there are always clinics where you can work 9-5. This is what's beautiful about nursing, it's so versatile. you put enough work and effort into looking, you will likely find a position that works for you. Good luck!!

pixiestudent2

993 Posts

You can work a nursing job that's day shift only, the operating room or in a clinic, doctor offices, dialysis etc.

You don't have to work on a hospital floor.

macawake, MSN

2,141 Posts

Has 15 years experience.
I'm sorry for all the unasked-for opinions and negativity that some previous posters offered. And to answer your question, yes, days- only jobs absolutely exist. They are many hospitals who even offer 8-4 and such (one that comes to mind is CHOP). And there are always clinics where you can work 9-5. This is what's beautiful about nursing, it's so versatile. you put enough work and effort into looking, you will likely find a position that works for you. Good luck!!

I honestly don't think that any of the replies were unkind, I think that they were trying to offer realistic advice to OP. Making it sound like it's relatively easy for a new grad to secure a daytime job when that might not actually be the case depending on OP's location, isn't really helpful in my opinion.

About the unasked-for opinions, it's something that you get when you post a question on a forum. They might even be helpful because as someone new to a profession there might be questions that you don't yet know that you need to ask. If OP doesn't find them helpful, she is of course free to disregard them.

OldDude

1 Article; 4,787 Posts

Specializes in Pediatrics Retired.
I'm sorry for all the unasked-for opinions and negativity that some previous posters offered. And to answer your question, yes, days- only jobs absolutely exist. They are many hospitals who even offer 8-4 and such (one that comes to mind is CHOP). And there are always clinics where you can work 9-5. This is what's beautiful about nursing, it's so versatile. you put enough work and effort into looking, you will likely find a position that works for you. Good luck!!

Kass...I understand Dreamer is trying to be supportive and encourage your optimism, and of course, anything is possible, but odds are this really isn't likely to be available for a new grad; no experience.