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BSN Required or Not? Share your job search experience please

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Dear All

I am still in school and hear conflicting stories from different people about BSN vs AS RN. Some people say that hospitals DO NOT hire Associate degrees any more and require BSN. Other people, in particular some doctors I spoke with, said that their hospitals do hire AS degrees, as long as you have your RN license.

Please share your Job Search and interview experiences in this regard.

I think it depends on where you are. Bigger cities are more likely to require you to have your BSN than smaller more rural communities. I live in a city the west, where I am hospitals want BSNs. ADs can easily find jobs at Dr.s offices, SNFs and LTCs though. The best way to get you an answer for where YOU are is to look often in the jobs postings of hospitals in your areas. They will either say BSN required or they won't and then you will know for sure.

estrellaCR, BSN, RN

Specializes in OB, Pediatrics, Maternal/Child Health. Has 2 years experience.

BSN is becoming the "norm" throughout the US. Areas where there are a lot of candidates per position definitely require BSN degree. ASNs are having very difficult time in finding jobs and occasionally nursing homes/skilled nursing facilities and clinics hire ASN, but most ASNs remain jobless until they go through an RN to BSN program and then their chances improve.

ASNs get hired only if they have significant experience then they are hired and advised to start a BSN program. A way for ASN with no experience to be hired is to know someone high up in the hospital administration or to go to a rural area where not many people apply hence a real "nursing shortage" for example Montana, North Dakota, and border towns in Texas are quite new grad friendly and more likely to give ASNs a chance. With the shift to most employers requiring BSNs, i wonder how ASN schools still exist, likely b/c students are not informed that an ASN is no longer enough to get a job and complete BSN while also working as an RN and having a paycheck. And of course ASN schools do not tell students the reality of the job market b/c then no one would sign up for their school. It is unfair to the students but that's how the schools do it, profit is a main goal.

You can still work with a Asn however the writing is on the wall; plan to get Bsn soon. My school offers Asn but just implemented a partnership with Drexel allowing is to start rn to bsn online. Has a nice discount rate too

Thank you for those replied. I am skeptical about online BSN, not sure if they get hired at all....

HouTx, BSN, MSN, EdD

Specializes in Critical Care, Education. Has 35 years experience.

I'm also skeptical - that physicians are even aware of nursing qualifications. IMO, they have no idea what is included in our educational programs nor are they interested... they only want someone available to do what they want, when they want it done. :sarcastic:

Florida: Majority of my peers with ASN found jobs fairly quickly in all types of specialities (ER, L&D and ICU included. Took me 6 months. I have an ASN degree. I agree with above posters that said as long as you plan to start or you're already in a program you can still get hired in some places.

AnnieOaklyRN, BSN, RN, EMT-P

Specializes in ED, Pedi Vasc access, Paramedic serving 6 towns.

I live in the northeast and almost all hospitals are requiring BSN, if they aren't they are requiring you get it within a certain time span.

HPRN

RN., MSN, RN

Specializes in Perianesthesia. Has 30 years experience.

California: my hospital has mandated all BSN staff by midnoc 2019. All ADN/ASN RN's have been informed that they will be terminated unless they posess a BSN or higher degree starting in 2020.

Larry3373

Specializes in Critical Care; Recovery. Has 2 years experience.

South mississippi, I work with just as many (if not more) ADN prepared RNs as BSN.

MissMeeks

Specializes in N/A.

I agree it's all about where you happen to be. I live near Nashville, TN and ADN vs. BSN doesn't seem to be a big deal. The people that I speak with (both BSN and ADN) seem to have about the same difficulty finding a job. The further you get from the "big city" the less they seem to care. I personally chose ADN because I am paying out of pocket for school and schools offering ADN are much more prevalent in this area of the country. Good luck-I say make the big company you work for pay for your BSN ;)

MissMeeks

Specializes in N/A.

California: my hospital has mandated all BSN staff by midnoc 2019. All ADN/ASN RN's have been informed that they will be terminated unless they posess a BSN or higher degree starting in 2020.

Just out of curiosity does your hospital offer tuition reimbursement? A friend of mine is in a similar situation (as a Medical Assistant, not a RN) and her company is paying for everyone to be educated/licensed.

CT Pixie, BSN, RN

Has 10 years experience.

Thank you for those replied. I am skeptical about online BSN, not sure if they get hired at all....

My RN to BSN is online and is fully accredited and recognized by both my State BON as well as being accredited by ACEN (aka NLNAC). Everyone that has graduated fromm the program is recognized as being a BSN and all have been hired as such.

What I think you may be mixing an online RN to BSN up with is a fully online BSN which is a horse of a different color. An RN to BSN online course is for those nurses who are already licensed as RNs with associate degrees to further their education and become BSN RNs. I don't know of any online BSN program that is just for those who are starting out who are not currently licensed nurses.

As for your original question, ADN/ASN nurses are still being hired in acute care hospitals (I am one such example as are all of my cohorts from my graduating class) however it does depend on the hospital and the area. Around here (Northeast, Southern New England), while associate degree RNs are being hired, many (if not all) of the hospitals are requiring a BSN for certain departments as well as many are requiring all new hired associate degree nurses to enroll in an RN to BSN program within a certain time frame and graduated within a time frame. Many of the job postings either say BSN required or BSN strongly preferred.

RunBabyRN

Specializes in L&D, infusion, urology. Has 2 years experience.

Thank you for those replied. I am skeptical about online BSN, not sure if they get hired at all....

It depends on the program. I know that my university (a state university) offers a bridge program that is almost entirely online, and is very reputable. Do your research before jumping into a bridge program.

I agree with what people are saying- most hospitals either require a BSN or for you to be enrolled in a bridge program. There are other positions that will hire ADN/ASNs. I just started at a freestanding birth center, and the owner said straight up in the interview that BSN is important to her. It's really just going to depend on the facility.

SoaringOwl

Specializes in Med-Surg and Neuro.

Florida: Majority of my peers with ASN found jobs fairly quickly in all types of specialities (ER, L&D and ICU included. Took me 6 months. I have an ASN degree. I agree with above posters that said as long as you plan to start or you're already in a program you can still get hired in some places.

What part of FL? This isn't true for the Tampa area.

Nienna Celebrindal

Has 12 years experience.

Thank you for those replied. I am skeptical about online BSN, not sure if they get hired at all....

It depends on where you go, as others have stated brick and mortar schools often have unadvertised online RN to BSN programs. I know A LOT of nurses who did University of Phoenix. I have heard Grand Canyon and South University's program encouraged as well but I can't personally speak to either. I did attend South for my pre-reqs though and was happy.

I work in upstate NY, one of the main hospitals here requires a nurse to have their BSN in order to be considered for a job. While down the street, a teaching hospital have no problems hiring ASN. In my opinion, getting a BSN will save you the headaches in the long run. I'm working with nurses that has their ASN and are now required to go back to school for their BSN. It's a lot of work.

I am applying for jobs in NC All of the hospitals I have applied to state that you must have or be enrolled into a BSN program within a year of hire