better to do ASN at a community college?

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by mangoman mangoman (New) New

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RNsRWe, ASN, RN

4 Articles; 10,428 Posts

Well.......what really matters in the end for the OP is whether these credits will be transferrable AND whether a license is going to be issued at all for where he/she would like to work.

mangoman

mangoman

8 Posts

Thanks again for your replies. Based on what was said so far, I have decided to attend a community college to do the ADN/ASN. I am not sure which state I will end up practicing in, most likely in a north eastern state (probably PA). I will make sure the school has a good NCLEX pass rate, a good reputation, and transferable credits. Thank you everyone again for your valuable advice.

HolisticRN2016

HolisticRN2016

28 Posts

My school offers the online program, but honestly after just completing my 1st semester, I have no idea how or why (other than convenience)anyone would want to do this. Nursing school is grueling(and fun) but the VOLUME of information that you are required to know can be quite challenging (especially if you're like me and don't have a previous history in the medical field). There is no way I could've kept up with the workload if I did this online. I barely kept up in person. lol

RunBabyRN

RunBabyRN

Specializes in L&D, infusion, urology. Has 2 years experience. 3,677 Posts

Thanks again for your replies. Based on what was said so far, I have decided to attend a community college to do the ADN/ASN. I am not sure which state I will end up practicing in, most likely in a north eastern state (probably PA). I will make sure the school has a good NCLEX pass rate, a good reputation, and transferable credits. Thank you everyone again for your valuable advice.

Make sure you take a good look at the job market wherever you choose to practice. Look to see if BSNs are preferred in hospitals (or whatever area of nursing interests you). In some parts of the country, ASN/ADN nurses are having an impossible time getting into nursing, especially the areas that they find appealing. Sometimes a hospital that prefers BSN will accept you if you're enrolled in a bridge (ADN-BSN) program, or you agree to obtain your BSN within a specific amount of time. Just important to know what you're facing. :)

nurseprnRN

nurseprnRN, BSN, RN

2 Articles; 11,114 Posts

And make sure that if you are going to start with an associate's degree but plan to do the RN-to-BSN route that the potential target BSN programs will accept those associate degree's credits. If not, you're better off jus going for the BSN from the beginning. An ASN + RN-to-BSN = about 4 years, POSSIBLY MORE IF CREDITS DON'T TRANSFER. A straight BSN program = about 4 years. Read these boards -- and the want ads in your local and metro area papers-- enough and you'll discover that "BSN preferred" and "BSN required" means you won't be getting much opportunity to work as a new grad with only an associate's degree in most places.

Most online ed is not worth the paper it's printed on-- and certainly not the promissory note that comes with it. I know I'll get flamed for that, but talk to somebody who's done both and you'll talk to somebody who really knows the difference.

mangoman

mangoman

8 Posts

Thanks. This is all great advice. :)

And make sure that if you are going to start with an associate's degree but plan to do the RN-to-BSN route that the potential target BSN programs will accept those associate degree's credits. If not, you're better off jus going for the BSN from the beginning. An ASN + RN-to-BSN = about 4 years, POSSIBLY MORE IF CREDITS DON'T TRANSFER. A straight BSN program = about 4 years. Read these boards -- and the want ads in your local and metro area papers-- enough and you'll discover that "BSN preferred" and "BSN required" means you won't be getting much opportunity to work as a new grad with only an associate's degree in most places.

Actually, the only reason why I was considering the RN + RN-to-BSN path is because I read online that I can complete that path in 3 years instead of 4 -- 2 years ADN and 1 year RN-to-BSN online. I was actually thinking of doing the BSN degree instead of the RN + RN-to-BSN path but I will not be able to afford tuition at a 4 year university or college for the BSN degree. Even with the maximum financial aid award amount, it seems like I would still need to pay $1,000 - $2,000 out of pocket each semester, which I will not be able to afford at this time. I'll do more research on these two paths and post questions on the forums if I need assistance. Thanks again.

Most online ed is not worth the paper it's printed on-- and certainly not the promissory note that comes with it. I know I'll get flamed for that, but talk to somebody who's done both and you'll talk to somebody who really knows the difference.

Ok. Will do. Thanks.

Edited by mangoman

nurseprnRN

nurseprnRN, BSN, RN

2 Articles; 11,114 Posts

Actually, the only reason why I was considering the RN + RN-to-BSN path is because I read online that I can complete that path in 3 years instead of 4 -- 2 years ADN and 1 year RN-to-BSN online.

You can get an associate degree in English or math in 2 years, yes indeed. However, you will find that your nursing associate's degree will take you at least three years- a minimum of 1 and more likely 1.5 yrs of prerequisites before you're admitted to the nursing program. THEN it's two years to get a degree that allows you to sit the NCLEX licensure degree.

:: counting on fingers :: That looks a lot like 3 1/2 years for that, plus getting at least a year, and probably more like at least two unless you have time to go to school full time, for the BSN. Counting yet?

mangoman

mangoman

8 Posts

Actually, I already did my pre-reqs. I will have to research more on those 2 paths. Thanks for your reply.

Thank you all for your kindness in providing valuable advice. :)

Kandy83

Kandy83

161 Posts

Actually, I already did my pre-reqs. I will have to research more on those 2 paths. Thanks for your reply.

Thank you all for your kindness in providing valuable advice. :)

Why don't you go straight into med school? Or are you trying to help cover the cost by being a working RN going into med school?

sjalv

sjalv

Specializes in CVICU. Has 1 years experience. 897 Posts

One important thing to note - you will need to complete a RN-to-BSN program before you can continue on to a nurse anesthetist program or to medical school.

It is true she will need to complete an RN-BSN program before she can pursue CRNA school, but if she chooses to pursue medical school, her bachelors will not have to be in nursing. In fact, it's probably better if it isn't because most BSN degrees do not cover the heavy science requirements one needs to apply for most med schools.

cec1183

cec1183

17 Posts

It is true she will need to complete an RN-BSN program before she can pursue CRNA school, but if she chooses to pursue medical school, her bachelors will not have to be in nursing. In fact, it's probably better if it isn't because most BSN degrees do not cover the heavy science requirements one needs to apply for most med schools.

I agree, but the OP stated that he/she would start with an ADN. It would be quicker to bridge to a BSN than start a completely new degree in order to apply to med school.

sjalv

sjalv

Specializes in CVICU. Has 1 years experience. 897 Posts

I agree, but the OP stated that he/she would start with an ADN. It would be quicker to bridge to a BSN than start a completely new degree in order to apply to med school.

The thing is, none of her BSN classes will apply to a pre-med major, except maybe basic courses like Humanities or Statistics. But the 30ish credit hours of nursing classes won't. That's basically a year of full-time that could have been spent taking chemistry, physics, and advanced level math classes. She'll have to take these classes anyway if she chooses to get her BSN.