Bedside with an MSN?

Posted
by Sophia P Sophia P (New) New Student

Specializes in PCT on a telemetry unit and CNA at a nursing home.

Hi! I'm currently halfway through my nursing schooling and also working as a PCT at a cardiac unit at a local hospital. As I'm getting closer to finishing my degree I'm contemplating advanced practice programs. I want to have a MSN, potentially in nursing education, soon after graduating with my BSN but I don't want to leave the bedside immediately. Are there bedside roles for a RN with a MSN that especially involve teaching? Thanks!

RNNPICU, BSN, RN

Specializes in PICU. Has 16 years experience. 1,251 Posts

You can work as a bedside nurse with an MSN.

Ways to use education - think of ways to update discharge education on your unit, get involved with councils that focus on nurse professional development, skills training.

Easy to stay at the bedside. Also, really hone in on your discharge teaching of your patients

Skips, MSN, RN

Specializes in L&D. 502 Posts

I have a MSN and I work bedside. It’s possible!

Jasmine0

Jasmine0

21 Posts

@Skips Hi could you help me clarify a few things in regard to nursing. I have a non-nursing bachelor's degree and I looking to transition into nursing. I have been accepted to ABSN programs and I am waiting on a decision from a direct entry MSN/CNL program. My end goal is become a FNP. I am beyond stressed about making the right decision financially! I receive a lot of advice that I should do ADN - BSN - MSN route. What do you think is best? Timing is a big deal for me, I would like to get to my end goal as soon as possible. Also, is the starting salary for RNs truly the same despite the level of eduction (ADN vs. BSN vs. MSN). Lastly, are new grad CNLs able to start working in that role, or do employers want them to work beside first before transitioning into their CNL role? 

Skips, MSN, RN

Specializes in L&D. 502 Posts

15 hours ago, Jasmine0 said:

@Skips Hi could you help me clarify a few things in regard to nursing. I have a non-nursing bachelor's degree and I looking to transition into nursing. I have been accepted to ABSN programs and I am waiting on a decision from a direct entry MSN/CNL program. My end goal is become a FNP. I am beyond stressed about making the right decision financially! I receive a lot of advice that I should do ADN - BSN - MSN route. What do you think is best? Timing is a big deal for me, I would like to get to my end goal as soon as possible. Also, is the starting salary for RNs truly the same despite the level of eduction (ADN vs. BSN vs. MSN). Lastly, are new grad CNLs able to start working in that role, or do employers want them to work beside first before transitioning into their CNL role? 

Hello! I will try to help.

I think you should keep in mind which program is cheaper. ABSN and the MSN with clinical nurse leader will put you at the same place post graduation. You will need some clinical experience after graduation as a nurse before you can apply to FNP schools. Now, if you were to get your MSN right now, you could always go back for a post graduate certificate FNP program. That is what I am doing. Otherwise, you can do the ABSN and apply to Master's programs after getting some years of experience as a RN. It is up to you to decide cost of each program you are thinking about and how you want your career to look. Some areas utilize CNL much more than others. In the states I've practiced nursing, they do not utilize CNL. I know that Illinois does utilize it. Keep that in mind. It may not be much use to you in your career.

Starting salary is based upon years of experience. I have not made more due to having a Master's degree when working as a floor RN. I didn't even make more by having a BSN. It is based upon experience.

I am not familiar with the CNL role, as the states I have practiced nursing in do not utilize this role. I would do a search on this website regarding that. 

Thank you for asking me these questions. I hope this helped!

Jedrnurse, BSN, RN

Specializes in school nurse. Has 30 years experience. 2,776 Posts

15 hours ago, Jasmine0 said:

@Skips Hi could you help me clarify a few things in regard to nursing. I have a non-nursing bachelor's degree and I looking to transition into nursing. I have been accepted to ABSN programs and I am waiting on a decision from a direct entry MSN/CNL program. My end goal is become a FNP. I am beyond stressed about making the right decision financially! I receive a lot of advice that I should do ADN - BSN - MSN route. What do you think is best? Timing is a big deal for me, I would like to get to my end goal as soon as possible. Also, is the starting salary for RNs truly the same despite the level of eduction (ADN vs. BSN vs. MSN). Lastly, are new grad CNLs able to start working in that role, or do employers want them to work beside first before transitioning into their CNL role? 

Direct entry Clinical Nurse Leader, I assume you're referring to? I wouldn't have too much confidence in a clinical leader who is a brand new graduate nurse with no experience. Also, how do you know you want to be a leader if you're not yet a nurse? If you're a nose-to-the-grindstone type of student I'd say the ABSN is the route to go. The MSN/CNL would be sort of a detour if you want to be a FNP.

Also, if you're already planning to zoom past nursing to advanced practice, why not consider PA school?

mmc51264, ADN, BSN, MSN, RN

Specializes in orthopedic; Informatics, diabetes. Has 10 years experience. 3,068 Posts

I am a bedside nurse with an MSN in Informatics. I still like bedside more than anything right now. I do a lot of staff teaching and troubleshooting. I don't get paid for it, but it has been a component of climbing the clinical ladder. I also have a masters in teaching (not nursing education) and If I wanted, I could probably do clinical instructor or teach in Sim lab at nursing school (I am a teaching hospital with a nsg and med school). 

I also do a lot of diabetes education. I have 2 type 1 kids and am forever teaching everyone about it, including pumps and CGMs

 

mmc51264, ADN, BSN, MSN, RN

Specializes in orthopedic; Informatics, diabetes. Has 10 years experience. 3,068 Posts

20 hours ago, Jedrnurse said:

Also, if you're already planning to zoom past nursing to advanced practice, why not consider PA school?

Sounds like she is not interested in advanced practice. Or I am confused. How does becoming a CNL or MSN in education or admin help getting to NP? 

I would be VERY wary of someone who has zero nursing experience. I have been on the interview team for new managers and we would not be too keen on someone with no experience. 

meanmaryjean, DNP, RN

Specializes in NICU, ICU, PICU, Academia. Has 45 years experience. 7,899 Posts

CNL is not an advanced practice role- and is not utilized in many places outside federal facilities like the VA. 

I worked bedside with an MSN ED for years. Nothing says you cannot. 

mmc51264, ADN, BSN, MSN, RN

Specializes in orthopedic; Informatics, diabetes. Has 10 years experience. 3,068 Posts

What is the role?  It is a new phrase to me. Nurse manager? Higher up leadership?  

Jedrnurse, BSN, RN

Specializes in school nurse. Has 30 years experience. 2,776 Posts

21 minutes ago, mmc51264 said:

Sounds like she is not interested in advanced practice. Or I am confused. How does becoming a CNL or MSN in education or admin help getting to NP? 

I would be VERY wary of someone who has zero nursing experience. I have been on the interview team for new managers and we would not be too keen on someone with no experience. 

The post I responded to said that the end goal was to become a FNP.

meanmaryjean, DNP, RN

Specializes in NICU, ICU, PICU, Academia. Has 45 years experience. 7,899 Posts

7 minutes ago, mmc51264 said:

What is the role?  It is a new phrase to me. Nurse manager? Higher up leadership?  

It's a role the VA kind of invented. Supposed to be a skilled bedside practitioner who is a leader. NOT a managerial role from what I can see. NOT an advanced practice role either. I have NEVER seen a job posting for one either- outside the VA system.