Jump to content
2019 Nursing Salary Survey Read more... ×

As seen on TV

Nurses   (9,405 Views 69 Comments)
by JBMmom JBMmom (Member)

JBMmom has 6 years experience and works as a Nurse.

38 Likes; 1 Follower; 11,167 Visitors; 636 Posts

advertisement

You are reading page 3 of As seen on TV. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

ventmommy works as a Respiratory Therapist.

8 Likes; 9,951 Visitors; 378 Posts

I just watched "Shot" last night. Ironically it starred Noah Wyle (Dr. Carter on ER) as the main character and shooting victim. The message of the movie was phenomenal but every single bit of medical stuff was so horribly wrong from beginning to end.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Kallie3006 has 6 years experience as a ADN and works as a Jack of all trades, master of none.

95 Likes; 4,898 Visitors; 321 Posts

I read somewhere (possibly here??) That the inaccuracies are in the shows (even with medical consults) due to liability issues. Does anyone know if there is any truth to this?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

5 Likes; 3,209 Visitors; 91 Posts

Basically all injections. It's always with some giant IM needle, either directly into somebody's neck (what?) or into the IV tubing. Soooo dramatic looking. Nope, y'all know we went needleless like 20 years ago, right?

I also watched some show where one storyline had a pregnant surrogate who needed an emergent hemicrani due to blood in her brain. The parents of the fetus refused to allow the procedure (claiming they legally had all rights to her body until the baby was born) because there was a risk the baby could die. Conveniently left out the concept of if you need an emergent hemicrani it's to save your life and if she didn't get it the baby would definitely die. Also those parents were a-holes that didn't care about their surrogate.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

55 Likes; 7,537 Visitors; 1,155 Posts

NCIS:NO- Dwayne coded (after being in a coma and on RA) and they did CPR with the head of his bed up, compressions were about 5 at a time and very slow, they never intubated or even bagged him, gave no ACLS meds, shocked asystole into NSR, then he left AMA a few minutes later.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

djh123 has 5 years experience and works as a RN at a transitional rehab facility.

1 Like; 15,876 Visitors; 1,100 Posts

I've never watched medical shows much, except for Nurse Jackie, but when my ex watched "House" in its early days, I always cracked up at the team of 4-6 doctors spending a ton of time on ONE patient. Riiiiiiiiiiggghhht. Might happen occasionally at the Mayo Clinic, but otherwise, I doubt it.

On the other hand, as John Fogerty wrote in the 80's, "I know it's true, I know it's true, 'cause I saw it on TV".

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

2 Likes; 110 Visitors; 3 Posts

My favorite scene was a long, long time ago on Falcon Crest when Maggie needed a brain tumor removed from the left parietal lobe and she came out of surgery with her long blonde hair intact and flowing off the end of the cart. I worked Neurosurgery at the time and I was amazed that they did the surgery without any hair removal at all.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
advertisement

4 Likes; 5,598 Visitors; 240 Posts

I love when they have life threatening injuries, have dramatic surgery, nobody knows if they will live or not, but then wake right up out of anesthesia and talk to cops/ family like they just took a simple nap. I'm thinking SVU, any drama really.

Same goes for waking up out of a weeks/months long coma and they find patient having had walked down the hall or road and looking at a Christmas tree.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

11 Likes; 1,668 Visitors; 98 Posts

She was walking around the ER and realized one person was missing so SHE went out to the crash site and searched for the woman.

To second this, my favorite is when TV shows have doctors ambulating, toileting or placing IVs for patients, fluffing pillows or giving discharge instructions then walking the patient out, instructing laboring women on breathing. It's funny... but it's also adds to the confusion and frustration pts have when they only see a MD once per day for 5 minutes, or when your OBGYN shows up at the last minute JUST in time to pull the baby out. SMH

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Silly_Sally_RN has 13 years experience.

1 Like; 352 Visitors; 22 Posts

Keep an eye on the IV pumps on Grey's Anatomy. They frequently are programmed for Dextrose 5% at 100 mL/hr and Gentamycin 3 mg/kg/day. McDreamy had 4 pumps with these settings when he died.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

vampiregirl has 7 years experience as a BSN and works as a Hospice.

19 Likes; 13,023 Visitors; 647 Posts

My friends have officially banned me from watching medical tv shows in public places as I cannot refrain from "providing education" (i.e. talking to the tv) about incorrect procedures.

It's always interesting with a patient or a helpful family member recommends/ requests something that they saw on tv. I try to maintain professionalism but wow, sometimes that's a challenge!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

K+MgSO4 has 10 years experience and works as a nurse unit manager.

15 Likes; 1 Follower; 21,301 Visitors; 1,492 Posts

C collars and pillows

ED doctors visiting patients on wards

Not a single ID band check for ANY med or blood products

Executive visable on the wards :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Caprica6 has 10 years experience.

24 Likes; 2,322 Visitors; 51 Posts

I recently rewatched ER (love me some Noah Wylie!)...and the lack of hand hygiene/wearing the same gloves as they bounce between traumas was driving me nuts!

Edited by Caprica6
Spelling

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
×