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Are We Too PC?

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traumaRUs has 27 years experience as a MSN, APRN and works as a Asst Community Manager @ allnurses.

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Have we become a nation of slugs, so offended by a simple old-time Christmas song that we want to ban it from the radio? Where does this leave us in real life? You are reading page 13 of Are We Too PC?. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

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It should not be banned. Book banning and the banning of cultural videos is fascism. I did look at the instances differently because statistically, men have been more sexually persistent and in some cases aggressive and forceful. Men and women are different, their experiences have been different. Yes, sexism, misogyny, racism has existed and does exist probably to lesser overt ways in the present. Does that mean we should censor ourselves, ban books and video? No, it does not. The book Lolita is a perfect example. The book Huckleberry Fin and The Diary of Ann Frank depict racism and the latter a very touching story about the Nazi Holocaust. It's good to have these cultural references for exploration. Should we go back to book burning? That's what the PC culture seems to push.

In this day and age, consent from both parties engaged in intimate acts is required to be respectful and enjoyable. If a man says no, a woman needs to respect the no and so must a man. If I heard the song without the video, it would not be provocative. I do not believe in censorship. That is not an aspect of democracy. PC is not the same as being democratic. Real equality and justice involves respect and learning from the past and trying to understand each other as human beings. That cannot occur if we censor each other.

Regarding touching of har. I've had black people touch my hair and was never offended by it. If I felt uncomfortable I would have said something. I'm a pretty easy going person though. My closest friend in high school was black, in fact, I grew up in a mostly black neighborhood and I have 2 sisters who have black fathers. We have the same mom. I love being around a diverse group of people. I don't feel the urge to touch a strangers hair, but if it were my friend I might ask to touch their hair if I were curious about it. Consentual touching is not offensive.

Maybe people are curious about each other. If we were kids again without any of the BS prejudices, would asking "I'm curious about you, tell me about your culture, can I touch your hair" be so offensive? We are all human beings with finite lives at the end of the day. Let's live together and get over the past and celebrate our future. We have so many things on our plate as a race of human beings, let us appreciate our differences and allow space to learn and grow. This requires honesty and open conversations and a little humor too.

If you are not black then you don't have the right to decide that someone putting their hands in my hair out of "child like curiosity" is something I should accept love, sorry. You don't get to speak for different groups of color because you happen to know a few. That's not how that works.

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WestCoastSunRN has 20 years experience as a BSN and works as a CCRN.

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Yeah, I read this.

Lost me over "victim hood" and SJW, which is right-wing lingo for Social Justice Warrior.

Yes, it is all ideology.

Ah.... good catch --- I have to admit I did not know what SJW meant.

That said -- when I say it's about ideology -- I am referring to extreme swings of the ideological pendulum. And I *think* that the whole PC thing mirrors those swings... and I *think* the animal farm comment a poster made awhile was very thoughtful.

Many moons ago, I had a professor in college say, "In fighting the monster we need to be careful we don't BECOME the monster".

This never left me... I think about that a LOT... because I have seen that one can be, on the surface, quite "PC", and yet, at the same time be quite morally corrupt (even by their own stated standards -- and speaking in a very universal sense, ie. not a religious one).

I have seen power shifts, and the truth is .... power corrupts.

As far as an everyday application of the idea of political correctness? My own personal rules are sort of:

1. Think before acting/speaking, but don't overthink... overthinking ends up being a very egocentric, narcissistic activity and is not good for mental health.

2. Apologize if you do #1, and it turns out you should have put more thought into what you said/did than you did.

3. Be curious about people and always be kind and want the best for another person. I moved to a very sensitive part of the country. I quickly learned words and actions that were the norm in my home culture were unacceptable to many people in this part of the country. Sometimes I understand why, but often I do not. It matters not -- if it's going to offend I will try to remember not to say/do it. Probably I won't be best-friends with these people I must censor myself with -- and that is OK. Sometimes though -- friendships grow over time despite differences in culture and people can really be themselves with each other (this is a beautiful thing), but this is earned, over time, in a friendship built on mutual respect.

4. Don't be easily offended. I do #'s 1-3, but do not always have them done unto me. It happens. It needs to be water off a duck's back..... most often, it is not worth the time and energy to "educate" someone else on how they could have treated me better. Maybe this is laziness, or whatever.... I'm just being honest. Now if it is someone else -- I have and will (pretty much a sure thing) speak up and educate. I can't stand bullies -- even if it's just out of ignorance.

But that's just me. You (whoever's reading) do you.

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Orca has 22 years experience and works as a Corrections RN/DON.

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I am just down the road from you, in central KY.

Are you unfamiliar with the words to My Old Kentucky Home?

The state song of my home state of Florida, Old Folks at Home (AKA Swanee River), contains the line,

"Oh, darkies, how my heart grows weary, far from the old folks at home."

It's a product of a different time. If the residents of my former state decide that another tune now better suits designation as the state song, let them choose one. I didn't write the current one, so I would have no issue with them replacing it. I'm not sure why states need official songs anyway.

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1 Follower; 11,066 Visitors; 449 Posts

It should not be banned. Book banning and the banning of cultural videos is fascism. I did look at the instances differently because statistically, men have been more sexually persistent and in some cases aggressive and forceful. Men and women are different, their experiences have been different. Yes, sexism, misogyny, racism has existed and does exist probably to lesser overt ways in the present. Does that mean we should censor ourselves, ban books and video? No, it does not. The book Lolita is a perfect example. The book Huckleberry Fin and The Diary of Ann Frank depict racism and the latter a very touching story about the Nazi Holocaust. It's good to have these cultural references for exploration. Should we go back to book burning? That's what the PC culture seems to push.

In this day and age, consent from both parties engaged in intimate acts is required to be respectful and enjoyable. If a man says no, a woman needs to respect the no and so must a man. If I heard the song without the video, it would not be provocative. I do not believe in censorship. That is not an aspect of democracy. PC is not the same as being democratic. Real equality and justice involves respect and learning from the past and trying to understand each other as human beings. That cannot occur if we censor each other.

Regarding touching of har. I've had black people touch my hair and was never offended by it. If I felt uncomfortable I would have said something. I'm a pretty easy going person though. My closest friend in high school was black, in fact, I grew up in a mostly black neighborhood and I have 2 sisters who have black fathers. We have the same mom. I love being around a diverse group of people. I don't feel the urge to touch a strangers hair, but if it were my friend I might ask to touch their hair if I were curious about it. Consentual touching is not offensive.

Maybe people are curious about each other. If we were kids again without any of the BS prejudices, would asking "I'm curious about you, tell me about your culture, can I touch your hair" be so offensive? We are all human beings with finite lives at the end of the day. Let's live together and get over the past and celebrate our future. We have so many things on our plate as a race of human beings, let us appreciate our differences and allow space to learn and grow. This requires honesty and open conversations and a little humor too.

Get over the past?

As a White person, it is easy for you to believe it is just that easy.

But it isn't.

Blacks, Native Americans, etc., are still living with the effects of slavery, forced migration, broken treaties, etc.

Unfortunately, many of these people don't have the luxury of simply to getting the past and moving on.

And I'll remind you, that Holocaust survivors, beg everyone not to forget the past.

I heard an NPR story yesterday, about a man who photographs survivors, who are well into their 90s.

They remember the events of Nazi Germany quite well. And they want everyone to remember.

Your post is written entirely from the perspective of the majority, without an ounce of consideration for those unlike you.

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Orion81RN has 5 years experience.

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If you are not black then you don't have the right to decide that someone putting their hands in my hair out of "child like curiosity" is something I should accept love, sorry. You don't get to speak for different groups of color because you happen to know a few. That's not how that works.

If that's what you gathered from the post, then you need to reread it.

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Orion81RN has 5 years experience.

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Get over the past?

As a White person, it is easy for you to believe it is just that easy.

But it isn't.

Blacks, Native Americans, etc., are still living with the effects of slavery, forced migration, broken treaties, etc.

Unfortunately, many of these people don't have the luxury of simply to getting the past and moving on.

And I'll remind you, that Holocaust survivors, beg everyone not to forget the past.

I heard an NPR story yesterday, about a man who photographs survivors, who are well into their 90s.

They remember the events of Nazi Germany quite well. And they want everyone to remember.

Your post is written entirely from the perspective of the majority, without an ounce of consideration for those unlike you.

There's a difference between remember the past and enslaving yourself to it, being forever a victim. "Get over..." No. Move forward...yes

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There's a difference between remember the past and enslaving yourself to it, being forever a victim. "Get over..." No. Move forward...yes

You are right. There is a difference.

I suggest you reread the original post.

The poster wrote: Get over.

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amzyRN works as a RN-Emergency Services.

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If you are not black then you don't have the right to decide that someone putting their hands in my hair out of "child like curiosity" is something I should accept love, sorry. You don't get to speak for different groups of color because you happen to know a few. That's not how that works.

I don't want to touch your hair, nor do I have a desire to touch a stranger's hair regardless of what race they are. You can make all the assumptions you like about other people's intentions, but that doesn't make you right or some kind of righteous victim that needs to be catered to. If someone touches your hair without your permission tell them not to touch you again, but don't go assuming that just cuz someone is white they want to touch you or are trying to harm you or that they owe you. I don't owe anyone anything.

There are rich people of color who have way easier lives than some poor white folks by the way. There were white people who died during the civil rights movement. If you want to see some real suffering, go over to another country and see what kind of conditions they live in. Be a little more grateful for what you do have and drop that victim BS. Not sorry.

Also, don't assume because you're black that you know how every other black person thinks, because you don't. That's stereotyping too my friend.

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As a millennial, yes, I think we are way too PC these days. Perhaps it's a result of how I was raised, but I much prefer people to be blunt so you know where you stand. You need to be considerate, but there is such a thing as taking that consideration too far.

Let's follow the Golden Rule: "Treat others as you wish to be treated." Be open and accepting, ask calmly if you have a question and don't touch someone without permission unless you need to tap their shoulder to get their attention or something. Is it really that hard?

I have friends who are all ages and from all walks of life whose company I enjoy and who (hopefully) enjoy my company -- otherwise I'm assuming we wouldn't be friends! That strategy works pretty well for me.

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I don't want to touch your hair, nor do I have a desire to touch a stranger's hair regardless of what race they are. You can make all the assumptions you like about other people's intentions, but that doesn't make you right or some kind of righteous victim that needs to be catered to. If someone touches your hair without your permission tell them not to touch you again, but don't go assuming that just cuz someone is white they want to touch you or are trying to harm you or that they owe you. I don't owe anyone anything.

There are rich people of color who have way easier lives than some poor white folks by the way. There were white people who died during the civil rights movement. If you want to see some real suffering, go over to another country and see what kind of conditions they live in. Be a little more grateful for what you do have and drop that victim BS. Not sorry.

Also, don't assume because you're black that you know how every other black person thinks, because you don't. That's stereotyping too my friend.

No where did the poster portray themselves as a victim.

Your right-wing ideology is on full display with that comment.

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amzyRN works as a RN-Emergency Services.

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Get over the past?

As a White person, it is easy for you to believe it is just that easy.

But it isn't.

Blacks, Native Americans, etc., are still living with the effects of slavery, forced migration, broken treaties, etc.

Unfortunately, many of these people don't have the luxury of simply to getting the past and moving on.

And I'll remind you, that Holocaust survivors, beg everyone not to forget the past.

I heard an NPR story yesterday, about a man who photographs survivors, who are well into their 90s.

They remember the events of Nazi Germany quite well. And they want everyone to remember.

Your post is written entirely from the perspective of the majority, without an ounce of consideration for those unlike you.

I acknowledge there is racism, sexism, and other prejudices. But your reply is presumptious, that I am like "the majority" when in fact I am not.

Most of my family came here to escape the Nazi persecution and were sent to concentration camps. I have family who are survivors. My grandmother had to work when she came to this country to support her entire family and died early because she had to work when she had strep throat. She had rhumatic fever and died early from a heart attack.

I grew up in a poor neighborhood that was mostly black. I had lots of friends and was for the most part accepted. But I also faced harassment by people because I was white. I had to fight to defend myself, physically from people who thought that they would take their hate out on me from systemic racism that I had no part in.

Have you grown up poor or been harassed or called names or got your butt kicked because of your race? If not, then please don't lecture me.

Does this mean that I should hate black people or German people (because of what happened to "my people")? I don't think so. I take ownership of my present-day circumstances. I am grateful for my childhood because it built character and I am stronger because of it.

Yes, in general people of color, women, especially Native Americans have a harder time getting out of the terrible systemic racism. But, it's possible and that is something to be grateful for. That is something that people with white skin also gave their lives for.

In Saudi Arabia, women are overtly oppressed. In Yemen, children are starving to death. Have a little more gratitude for what you have, we have, is what I say. Let's work together to make things better, not get hung up on some "microagression".

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Leader25 has 35 years experience.

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​It is so PC that I am highly offended,just saying.

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