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Anyone heard any reason gel polish is worse than regular polish??

Nurses   (14,190 Views | 85 Replies)

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You are reading page 6 of Anyone heard any reason gel polish is worse than regular polish??. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

Wave Watcher has 7 years experience and specializes in Community Health/School Nursing.

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What's wrong with Google Scholar?

You do realize that research studies are searchable via google, right?

Ditto! I sure don't have time to stroll down to my college library and fumble through scholarly journals for my advanced research class. They are all accessible online. And yes....I too have used google to find research information.

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LadyFree28 has 10 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Pediatrics, Rehab, Trauma.

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This study was specifically about fake nails, not "no chip" polish.

No chip polish can go under the category of "nail wraps"; most "no chip polish" has a derivative of nail wrap substance.

"artificial" can be relative as well.

I'm only presenting what hospitals and facilities are probably using this information from; best to point out if explored that this information at best is outdated; my post was not for or against a policy per se, but what one can decipher, then put in as a policy, forgetting that research and EBP can be very fluid.

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940 Posts; 16,626 Profile Views

I don't see the need for anyone to accuse a nurse with a different point of view of not having a "meconium of sense". In my opinion, that's taking it way too far. Especially without almighty evidence-based practice. Nails themselves have crevices that can harbor bacteria. So do watches, wedding rings, and id badge holders. I'd be willing to bet that some of you nurses hating on gel polish wore the hell out of some acrylic or lee press-on nails back in the day.

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MedChica specializes in Psych, LTC/SNF, Rehab, Corrections.

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News to me.

I thought we could wear shellac polish...? Somehow, I thought it was preferred over regular polish (and acrylics of course)...if they weren't chipped and whatnot.>sigh

I work with nurses who wear acrylics. Aides, too. I don't say anything but I just think "Yuck!" when I see them.

...'specially the aides. It'd be different if we weren't functioning in a clinical setting but we are. We're entirely too "hands on" to be running around in acrylics.

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klone has 14 years experience as a MSN, RN and specializes in Women's Health/OB Leadership.

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I don't see the need for anyone to accuse a nurse with a different point of view of not having a "meconium of sense". .

Okay, I snorted. Was this an autocorrect?

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macawake has 10 years experience.

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This debate makes me appreciate the policy at my hospital.

Short nails, no nail polish of any kind. No rings. No wristwatch. No sleeves below the elbow.

Delightfully simple :)

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2 Articles; 11,114 Posts; 15,164 Profile Views

I don't see the need for anyone to accuse a nurse with a different point of view of not having a "meconium of sense". In my opinion, that's taking it way too far. Especially without almighty evidence-based practice. Nails themselves have crevices that can harbor bacteria. So do watches, wedding rings, and id badge holders. I'd be willing to bet that some of you nurses hating on gel polish wore the hell out of some acrylic or lee press-on nails back in the day.

That you can also have dirty ID badges, ties (on males), rings, stethoscopes, scissors, shoes, and watches falls under the category of "everything you say is true; so what?" Hands touch patients and everything else around a lot more than ID badges or watches. Removing rings isn't a bad idea. I used to know a chief of surgery who would cut off neckties with his bandage scissors if they weren't completely secured.

 

Anyone with a MODICUM (look it up-- it doesn't mean "fetal fecal material") of sense would see the similarities, not the differences.

 

There is ample evidence that artificial substances on nails increase the likelihood of hard-to-remove infectious agents being carried on hands. Comparing one to another or saying that because there are no negative or comparative studies between the different classifications of artificial substances on nails is specious. And no, that doesn't have anything to do with "special." Although ...

 

And since you mention it, no, I never, ever, ever wore polish/ Lee Press-ons, or acrylic "back in the day." As soon as those studies came out, nobody in our hospitals did.

 

:: wishing AN had a beat-the-dead-horse smilie::

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940 Posts; 16,626 Profile Views

Okay, I snorted. Was this an autocorrect?

What can I say besides I have an old kindle fire and I know how to use it? Most of the time.

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ThePrincessBride has 5 years experience as a BSN and specializes in Med-Surg, NICU.

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Anyone with a MODICUM (look it up-- it doesn't mean "fetal fecal material") of sense would see the similarities, not the differences.

 

Ha, ha! I thought I was the only one to catch that. ;)

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983 Posts; 12,343 Profile Views

Call me whatever you wish, I still choose to wear my no-chip polish (as is completely fine in my facility) and until there is hard data specifically about this polish that shows how bad it is, I'll continue to do so.

And if my patients think I'm a HUGE FLOOZY for having on red polish well then it'll give them something to talk about!

There are way bigger battles to fight.

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392 Posts; 6,433 Profile Views

plus how do people get it to last with the insane amount of hand washing nurses and all health care professionals are supposed to be doing?

This!

I am a girly girl and always have been. However, the two or three times that I did paint my nails before work it chipped literally within an hour or two. Even using a special protective coat on top didn't help.

I gave up...it's not worth the time and effort to have it chip or peel hours later. And I absolutely hate chipped or peeling nail polish. I think it looks hideous!

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0.adamantite has 3 years experience and specializes in Acute Care - Adult, Med Surg, Neuro.

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That you can also have dirty ID badges, ties (on males), rings, stethoscopes, scissors, shoes, and watches falls under the category of "everything you say is true; so what?"

Yes, nobody has addressed the issue of wearing rings. This is far more disgusting to me than my occasional regular nail polish wearing. Do those of you saying that you dont wear nail polish at work also remove your rings before the job?

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