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Any nurses wished they had become doctors?

Posted

Specializes in Public Health Science. Has 2 years experience.

Any nurses wished they had gone to medical school and developed their skills further? I am torn because I feel like the quality of life of a doctor is just too poor to be worth the rewards of accumulating more medical knowledge. I also feel like nurses that want to excel can do so on their own.

HiddenAngels

Has 7 years experience.

I still vacillate back and forth, but more on the no side nowadays. Believe it or not I actually wish I would have become a math teacher.

Davey Do

Specializes in around 25 years psych, 10 years medical. Has 42 years experience.

On 4/29/2020 at 6:59 PM, Mindy834920 said:

Any nurses wished they had gone to medical school... ?

I telephoned my Mom back in 1979 to tell her that I had passed my EMT certification. She was very pleased and said, "Dave, you should become a Doctor!"

I thought about it.

For about five seconds.

I thought about a few seconds. The thought of being a resident for years made me just sit back and appreciate being a nurse so much more.

Davey Do

Specializes in around 25 years psych, 10 years medical. Has 42 years experience.

5 minutes ago, NurseBlaq said:

I thought about a few seconds.

We gave the thought ample time for consideration, eh NurseBlaq?

Sounds about right. 😉

Tegridy

Specializes in Former NP now Internal medicine PGY-1.

If you want to be a nurse go to nursing school. If you want to be a doctor go to medical school. Different jobs with different roles. Nursing isn’t really a stepping stone to become a doctor. Different career.

There is probably more QOL difference between medical specialties than there is between medicine in general and nursing. Want spare time? ER I'm FM, psych, peds. Want to work your butt off. Gen Surg, ortho, trauma, Neuro, some I'm sub specialties. you can always work less and make less also. A lot of ER docs work three days a week.

Edited by Tegridy

amoLucia

Specializes in LTC.

DD & NurseBlaq - I'm joining you 2!

Davey Do

Specializes in around 25 years psych, 10 years medical. Has 42 years experience.

12 hours ago, Tegridy said:

If you want to be a nurse go to nursing school. If you want to be a doctor go to medical school.

Gee, thanks for the directions, Tegridy!

Davey Do

Specializes in around 25 years psych, 10 years medical. Has 42 years experience.

11 hours ago, amoLucia said:

DD & NurseBlaq - I'm joining you 2!

amoLucia, welcome to "The Five Second Rule Club"!

Tegridy

Specializes in Former NP now Internal medicine PGY-1.

2 hours ago, Davey Do said:

Gee, thanks for the directions, Tegridy!

Haha I know. I think the OP may have it in her mind that nursing is a step to medical school which seems prevalent in those not acquainted with healthcare.

amoLucia

Specializes in LTC.

6 hours ago, Davey Do said:

amoLucia, welcome to "The Five Second Rule Club"!

That's also about how long I had once considered SCHOOL nsg. I have the utmost R E S P E C T and admiration for those nurses.

llg, PhD, RN

Specializes in Nursing Professional Development. Has 44 years experience.

No. I grew up surrounded by physicians. I chose nursing on purpose. They are 2 separate fields. I preferred nursing. As I wanted to learn more and acquire more credentials, I was able to do that while staying within nursing.

Future MSN

Specializes in Public Health Science. Has 2 years experience.

4 hours ago, llg said:

No. I grew up surrounded by physicians. I chose nursing on purpose. They are 2 separate fields. I preferred nursing. As I wanted to learn more and acquire more credentials, I was able to do that while staying within nursing.

That is my goal. To get my MSN and then get my doctorate.

Future MSN

Specializes in Public Health Science. Has 2 years experience.

On 5/1/2020 at 3:20 PM, NurseBlaq said:

I thought about a few seconds. The thought of being a resident for years made me just sit back and appreciate being a nurse so much more.

For real. Residents are abused so much its unreal that its legal.

DavidFR, BSN, MSN, RN

Specializes in Oncology, ID, Hepatology, Occy Health. Has 35 years experience.

No, for the simple reason that medicine's too limiting.

You become a cardiologist for example, you're generally a cardiologist for life. Become an oncologist, oncologist for life, usually.

Nursing has given me variety: oncology, infectious diseases, occupational health and hepatology are what I consider my real specialities, but I've also worked in respiratory, cardiac, burns and plastics. I've worked with inpatients, outpatients, hospital, community, outreach and for an international inter-governmental organisation. I don't believe I'd have had such variety as a doctor.

In further studies too, doctors are limited largely to the clinical whereas my higher studies have taken in a lot of sociology, psychology and social theory which I adored for the more global view that gave me of patients.

As stated above, different jobs and I really get quite annoyed at the "when will you go on to be a doctor?" "A masters! You should have been a doctor!" type reactions - as if nursing is somehow not worthwhile.

Best of luck with your MSN!

Edited by DavidFR

Undercat, BSN, MSN, CRNA

Specializes in Retired. Has 41 years experience.

No. Never. We nurses never have to go to a partners' meeting
Lots of squabbling on top of a job that is hard enough.

HiddencatBSN, BSN

Specializes in Peds ED. Has 10 years experience.

No, I thought about it when I was shadowing an NP and got to go to the Infectious Disease Department rounds with her. It was so fascinating seeing them review cases. But by that point I’d spent 8 years getting a BA in lit, was doing nursing prerequisites, and the thought of how much more school plus residency and possibly fellowship and potentially never being “off” when not at work swayed me away. I’m 10 years in to being a nurse and am really happy with my decision and my specialty, and with the possibility to find new challenges if I get bored. And I love that other than con ED and keeping my knowledge fresh, when I clock out my responsibility ends and I own my free time. Well. My kids own my free time LOL.

I do prefer working in teaching institutions. For the price of July interns everyone is in teaching mode and there’s always something new and interesting to learn. When I worked at a nonteaching institution my experience was that docs viewed questions as challenges rather than a request for more information on the rationale for the plan of care.