Jump to content

Afraid of dying

Disasters   (1,698 Views | 30 Replies)

1,013 Profile Views; 13 Posts

Hi , not meaning to scare anyone but I am so anxious right now in this calm before the storm. I am preparing that I could die. And I don’t want to .

does anyone else feel this way ? It doesn’t help that there is a shortage of correct PPE’s around the world. Apologies for such a morbid post. I am on verge of anxiety attack.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1 Follower; 22 Posts; 369 Profile Views

I'm sorry you're feeling so anxious. It seems most people are. Something that can help with future thinking, is to come back to present. Find and focus on 5 things around you, that are tangible and real. Smells, sounds, colors.. things like that. I hope you find some relief, remember to breathe!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

malamud69 has 10 years experience as a ADN, BSN, EMT-B and specializes in Emergency.

574 Posts; 11,970 Profile Views

You are not alone! One decision at a time one moment at a time. Breathe-pace yourself-quiet. My current mantra is :”perspective-do the math”

You are not alone!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

4 Followers; 37,690 Posts; 103,316 Profile Views

Do you have spiritual inclinations? This is a good time to practice calming yourself with prayer. If you don’t want to do that, you don’t have to engage in religious practices in order to meditate.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

headofcurls has 4 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Critical Care.

53 Posts; 557 Profile Views

I feel the same. Today, I was telling myself, “everyone will die, at least you’ll die saving others and you’ve lived a good life so far”.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

ShortFuse has 9 years experience as a RN and specializes in Med-Surg, ER.

5 Posts; 209 Profile Views

Same. Pretty much on the verge of a panic attack as well. I try to find comfort in focusing on the recovery rates more than the death rates, and also think about how many positive cases there are that weren't severe enough to warrant a test, let alone hospitalization. And also consider the positive cases that dont even have symptoms at all! From what I've been reading, more than 80% of people experience only mild symptoms, around 14% severe, and 5% critical. I do wish they would give more information about the preexisting health of those who have died, as I feel this could help relieve a lot of anxiety for otherwise fairly healthy people. Also, trying to limit media exposure by finding other things to do seems to help me (somewhat). The unknown is the worst part of this whole thing!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

15 Posts; 2,377 Profile Views

I feel the same way, as I have chronic diseases that makes me think twice if I should go to work.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

hopefulinTN has 7 years experience as a BSN.

5 Posts; 712 Profile Views

You are not alone, I've wavered between sheer panic and crying. It's exhausting. Much like another poster said, try to find positive statistics. An article came out yesterday from the wall street journal I believe, where they reviewed stats, ultimately indicating the mortality rate is much lower most likely than is being reported. Every little nugget like this helps. Also, get some air, fresh air ...a short walk if you're able while listening to some music ....helps...especially after said cry session. I wish I had better advice, just know you are not alone.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

265 Posts; 1,447 Profile Views

Remember, the MAJORITY of people don't die from this!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

CaffeinePOQ4HPRN has 10 years experience as a BSN, MSN, LPN, RN.

432 Posts; 10,627 Profile Views

You are not alone. Personally, my emotions oscillate between feeling completely helpless and hope. Last night, I facetimed with a friend who is an ER doctors. We both broke down in tears at the state of things. Plus, everyone is extremely tired. So, that doesn't help.

I revised my personal advance directives for medical care and end-of-life care just in case something happens to me.

My advice which is helping me pull through, I hope some of it will help you is this...when you feel helpless, do not feel this way alone! Virtually stay connected with professional peers and talk it out, get enough sleep, drink enough water, get a little exercise, call friends and family, watch something silly to distract and decompress...sometimes, you need a breather and little break from our current reality.

KEEP WELL!

Edited by CaffeinePOQ4HPRN

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

6 Posts; 282 Profile Views

Looks like your media outlets scare you *** while there is no need. I'm a Dutch nurse. I recently found out that I've tested positive for COVID19. I have no idea where/how I contracted it. At our hospital you're getting tested when you have a cough. You won't be allowed to work until the test results are in, which is within 24 hours.
I had a dry cough every now and then this one day. And a slightly sore throat the next. That's when I consulted with my manager and she told me to get tested. The test came back positive.

I'm isolated at home, I take a spray bottle with bleach and some paper towels with me whenever I do have to leave my room and clean everything I touch on my back to my room. I'm in my 4th day after displaying the (very mild!) symptoms. I have some sore muscles and a dry cough. That's it. I'm not dying, I'm not going to die, and neither are my husband and daughter. My daughter still hugs me and gives me kisses, though sparsely ofcourse. Simply because you can't explain to a three year old she can't hug or kiss her mommy any more. She washes her hands and face after. She still hasn't displayed symptoms. My husband had a mild cough and sore muscles for two days and was up and running again after that.

We are not in lockdown here. Our government advises us to stay at home, and only come out to get groceries or for doctor's visits. Shops are closed, except for supermarkets and pharmacies. So we stay at home, we keep our distance, wash our hands. People with mild symptoms get isolated at their own home to take the pressure off the hospitals. Only when you get respiratory problems you're allowed to get medical help when you're positive for COVID19.

Why aren't we in lockdown? Because the virus won't disappear as soon as we've kept people in isolation for a long time. When we let everybody out at once after a lockdown, people will get sick again, and this time a great amount of people at once. Now, we people will get sick, but it will happen gradually, so we can manage the flow of sick people through the medical system.

Most people don't die from this. Hell, I bet you'd be shocked how many people already carry the virus. Most people will get mild symptoms, some may not show symptoms at all.

So take it from a nurse who's actually living through a COVID19-infection: it's not Ebola. If you're in good health, you're going to be fine. Just remember that only the worst cases get admitted to the hospital. We often tend to forget that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

CaffeinePOQ4HPRN has 10 years experience as a BSN, MSN, LPN, RN.

432 Posts; 10,627 Profile Views

56 minutes ago, Jungle-Nurse said:

Looks like your media outlets scare you *** while there is no need. I'm a Dutch nurse. I recently found out that I've tested positive for COVID19. I have no idea where/how I contracted it. At our hospital you're getting tested when you have a cough. You won't be allowed to work until the test results are in, which is within 24 hours.
I had a dry cough every now and then this one day. And a slightly sore throat the next. That's when I consulted with my manager and she told me to get tested. The test came back positive.

I'm isolated at home, I take a spray bottle with bleach and some paper towels with me whenever I do have to leave my room and clean everything I touch on my back to my room. I'm in my 4th day after displaying the (very mild!) symptoms. I have some sore muscles and a dry cough. That's it. I'm not dying, I'm not going to die, and neither are my husband and daughter. My daughter still hugs me and gives me kisses, though sparsely ofcourse. Simply because you can't explain to a three year old she can't hug or kiss her mommy any more. She washes her hands and face after. She still hasn't displayed symptoms. My husband had a mild cough and sore muscles for two days and was up and running again after that.

We are not in lockdown here. Our government advises us to stay at home, and only come out to get groceries or for doctor's visits. Shops are closed, except for supermarkets and pharmacies. So we stay at home, we keep our distance, wash our hands. People with mild symptoms get isolated at their own home to take the pressure off the hospitals. Only when you get respiratory problems you're allowed to get medical help when you're positive for COVID19.

Why aren't we in lockdown? Because the virus won't disappear as soon as we've kept people in isolation for a long time. When we let everybody out at once after a lockdown, people will get sick again, and this time a great amount of people at once. Now, we people will get sick, but it will happen gradually, so we can manage the flow of sick people through the medical system.

Most people don't die from this. Hell, I bet you'd be shocked how many people already carry the virus. Most people will get mild symptoms, some may not show symptoms at all.

So take it from a nurse who's actually living through a COVID19-infection: it's not Ebola. If you're in good health, you're going to be fine. Just remember that only the worst cases get admitted to the hospital. We often tend to forget that.

I think it's good to remember that other places don't manage things the same way as in the Netherlands....So, people have valid reasons for being scared. For example, where I live nurses are being denied PPE, and because testing kits are in short-supply they are not testing all front-line staff (and are forcing staff to work) although they may be exhibiting some early/minor symptoms.

I can't say I agree with Dutch authorities' decision to not impose movement restrictions. I think that is huge mistake.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
×

This site uses cookies. By using this site, you consent to the placement of these cookies. Read our Privacy, Cookies, and Terms of Service Policies to learn more.