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anicole285 anicole285 (New Member) New Member

ADN vs. ABSN

ADN/BSN   (4,064 Views 10 Comments)
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I am a second degree seeking student wanting to go back to school to become a nurse.

My two options are

1) Get my ADN and take the exam to become an RN. THEN Complete an Online RN to BSN Program WHILE working full time.

or

2) Shoot for an Accelerated BSN (main program I am looking at is 12 months of intense work)

Advice on the two methods?

I have no experience in a hospital setting which is where I would eventually like to end up. With the ABSN the program is around $35,000 plus supplies, books etc and I cant work during that 12 month period - so I will have no income.

With the ADN - the program is Fall/Spring/Fall/Spring (2 years). I will have summers off and I will actually not be full time each semester because I do have some classes already complete. SO I could work part time in this program and apply for a full time RN position after I take the NCLEX exam. Ill have 2 years of part time work under my belt by then.

Advice?

Thanks!

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Are you still eligible for financial aid? If not I would just go with the ADN first because it sounds like it has more pros then cons to take that route first. Plus, you can get your BSN in a year and have 2 years of experience under your belt (not to mention you'll get a higher end job much quicker with a BSN + experience).

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Same thing I hear all the time here about this and similar topics. . . How's the job market for ADNs versus BSNs in your area? You expressed a specific desire for acute care and in many (not all) areas of the country, they only hire BSNs. It totally makes sense to do the ADN first if there is some assurance you will get hired. Trouble is, for some areas of the country an ADN only enables you to take the NCLEX and start your RN to BSN program.

My area of the country used to be the place to come for jobs, then even we got saturated. My unit hasn't hired a new grad ADN in a couple of years. We have dozens of BSN new grads applications for every opening.

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Like everyone here says. Contact HR at the hospital you hope to work for and ask if they hire ADN new grads. As far as BSN over ADN well what are your long term goals? If it is to work bedside nursing for 20+ and they hire ADN then that makes more financial sense. If you want to move into management or grad school or if they are much more likely to hire a BSN prepared applicant then go the BSN route. It isn't so much "one or the other" they are different and they fit different goals and needs. It is up to you to do the work to gather the data you need to make an educated decision.

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I wouldn't survive a ABSN program. Took out only one year of financial aid during college that was mostly loans. I love to go ADN route, but demand is high and many employers prefer BSN in my state. Going the refuel BSN route...think it's about an extra year longer than the ADN route.

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I am second degree student going for an ASN at a community college because it is a fraction of the price of an ABSN in the area. Only one hospital in my area requires a BSN and the job market is pretty good for everyone. My plan is to work for a little while to pay off loans and then do an RN to MSN program since I already have a BS.

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I am second degree student going for an ASN at a community college because it is a fraction of the price of an ABSN in the area. Only one hospital in my area requires a BSN and the job market is pretty good for everyone. My plan is to work for a little while to pay off loans and then do an RN to MSN program since I already have a BS.
Way I like to go. A lot of RNs did ADN to MSN where I work. Now hospital will not hire any ADN/Diploma nurse's, they shut their Diploma program down...:-( All RUns have to have BSN by 2020.

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The least expensive route to becoming an RN is going to be getting your ADN from your local community college. As others have already noted, there is an overwhelming preference for BSN's and depending on your location, you may face considerable difficultly in getting a nursing job. That said, getting your ADN, passing the NCLEX and then going on to get your BSN from a state institution is definitely worth considering and will almost certainly be the lowest cost route.

I speak from experience in this, having done precisely that for my BSN. In my case, it was the evening/weekend nursing program at community college, which not only was relatively inexpensive (tuition and fees for the program ran about $6,500, though this was some years back), but also allowed me to continue to work full-time. (An aside: working full-time and completing a nursing program requires commitment, planning and a supportive spouse - it is not for the faint of heart.) Once I passed the nursing boards, I applied to the RN-BSN program at a state university. Not only was the tuition reasonable (about $8,000) but the program was offered via both a traditional classroom or on-line. The total cost, including books, fees, equipment, etc to get a BSN was less than $17,000.

Like you, I was a second-degree student when I enrolled in the ADN program, and so had a significant amount of the required coursework out of the way. I'd be surprised then if the total cost for the ADN-RN-BSN wasn't something like 40% less the $35,000 you cite. Your cost is likely to be significantly greater going the ADN-RN-MSN route, but if you can find a state school masters program, may not exceed the $35k figure. Just a guess on my part though.

Edited by chuckster
typo

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