ACUTE CARE NP and private practice

Posted
by Sun1 Sun1 Member Student Pre-Student

Specializes in N/A. Has 3 years experience.

Can you please all put your suggestions regarding private practice rules....can an acute care NP open up a private practice in a state that allows a NP to do so. 

Have you seen acute care NP working in medicine speciality practices, I.e. cardiology, GI, renal?  Is it hospital based or at a medical office?

Thanks in advance for all your comments. 

Numenor

Specializes in rounding on the floors probably. Has 10 years experience. 552 Posts

I believe you can work OP but the majority of your work needs to be IP. FOr example, a GI NP who does clinic 20% and rounds the rest and or does consults.

ghillbert, MSN, NP

Specializes in CTICU. Has 26 years experience. 3,796 Posts

Incorrect. Acute care specifically refers to the patient population, not the location. You can work anywhere, if you're seeing acutely ill patients.

Neuro Guy NP

Neuro Guy NP, DNP, PhD, APRN

Specializes in Vascular Neurology and Neurocritical Care. Has 10 years experience. 374 Posts

On 1/3/2022 at 8:27 PM, ghillbert said:

Incorrect. Acute care specifically refers to the patient population, not the location. You can work anywhere, if you're seeing acutely ill patients.

Yep. People need to familiarize themselves with the consensus model.

JBMmom, MSN, NP

Specializes in New Critical care NP, Critical care, Med-surg, LTC. Has 10 years experience. 4 Articles; 2,284 Posts

During my clinical rotations I did outpatient rotations in vascular surgery, pulmonology and nephrology. All of the offices employed NPs in different capacities. At the nephrology office the NP did three weeks in the office and then one week at the dialysis clinic and one week of inpatient with call. The vascular surgery office had an NP see patients only in the clinic. The pulmonology office had NPs in the past but none currently and also had them only seeing outpatients, but was considering a position with both outpatient and inpatient resposibilities. 

Polly Peptide

Polly Peptide, BSN, MSN, RN, APRN

Specializes in Rheumatology NP. Has 3 years experience. 221 Posts

The patient may not only be acute but can have complex chronic conditions, at any location.  

"The purpose of the ACNP is to provide advanced nursing care across the
continuum of health care services to meet the specialized physiologic and psychological needs of patients with acute, critical, and/or complex chronic health conditions. This care is continuous and comprehensive and may be provided in any setting where the patient may be found."

Quoted from AACN's Scope and Standard's document for AG-ACNPs.

acnp-scope-and-standards.pdf

FullGlass

FullGlass, BSN, MSN, NP

Specializes in Adult and Geriatric Primary Care. Has 4 years experience. 2 Articles; 1,403 Posts

I suggest you check with your state board of nursing.  They should information on their website.  If not, call or email them.  It is important to know the licensing laws in your state, as this is governed at the state level.

Polly Peptide

Polly Peptide, BSN, MSN, RN, APRN

Specializes in Rheumatology NP. Has 3 years experience. 221 Posts

2 hours ago, FullGlass said:

I suggest you check with your state board of nursing.  They should information on their website.  If not, call or email them.  It is important to know the licensing laws in your state, as this is governed at the state level.

Agree...however, the OP stated "assuming your state allows" an acute care NP in private practice.

There are some states that do not give guidance on what an acute care (vs FNP vs PMHNP etc) can or cannot do.  I live in one of them.  In that scenario, the only thing you can do is rely on your certification and the definition from the certifying bodies and/or your education.

FullGlass

FullGlass, BSN, MSN, NP

Specializes in Adult and Geriatric Primary Care. Has 4 years experience. 2 Articles; 1,403 Posts

3 hours ago, Polly Peptide said:

Agree...however, the OP stated "assuming your state allows" an acute care NP in private practice.

There are some states that do not give guidance on what an acute care (vs FNP vs PMHNP etc) can or cannot do.  I live in one of them.  In that scenario, the only thing you can do is rely on your certification and the definition from the certifying bodies and/or your education.

Me too.  In California and NP is an NP is an NP . . .

However, independent practice requirements differ by state.  Some states require a certain number of years of experience before full IPA, etc.