Brick & Mortar NP Programs- are they no longer a thing?

  1. Hi all-

    I'm looking for the names of some in-person, brick and mortar MSN programs. I'm interested in either FNP or PNP (I'm currently a pediatric RN). For the longest time I've highly considered going back to school but to be a PA instead of an NP because it seems as if all of the NP programs are now online! I'm not meaning to offend anyone that is an online NP student, but I just finished my BSN online and that type of learning is not my style. I know I want to be a "midlevel" practitioner (for lack of a better term), but I would seriously prefer an in-person learning environment. Thanks!
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  2. 18 Comments

  3. by   cleback
    I get what you're saying. A fully in person msn program I haven't heard of. You would be able to find hybrid programs though. I'd look to the established universities near you.
  4. by   KatieMI
    Look for big names. John Hopkins and University of Michigan/Ann Arbor are still mostly in-class, for one example.

    Just keep in mind that such programs cost accordingly and that many of them still do not provide preceptors (although they might offer more help in finding them). Where they do it, NP students often placed in locations which medical schools refuse, such as inner city community clinics and even prisons, which severely limits the value of expirience.
  5. by   FPNP
    I go to a brick and mortar NP program in WI. For gods sakes, don't call yourself a future "midlevel." That term only exists in DEA prescription authority administratively. Its a word physicians use to demean us. Don't use it.
  6. by   lwsoccjs
    Shame that needs to be consistently said over and over but its true FPNP. Weather she graduates from a PA or NP school maybe she will have a little more respect for the title at that point. Now to your point. I go to a brick and mortar school in FL but it is like so many others being hybrid. I think at the end of the day you need to ask yourself. Do you really have the discipline to self study. I feel many that complain that online isn't your thing lack this ability. PA is going to cater more to forcing you to be in front of a teacher. But also its a full time gig and MOST people do not work in PA school. In NP school SO MANY do. I personally do not work. I also guarantee I am able to put in more hours then someone that does work. So either way think of it as an investment and the time spent should be equal. Many peoples down fall in my opinion is that they see NP as a graduate education they can work at the same time which just is not true in relation to all our other graduate healthcare equals like PA, Pharm, MD, DPT and many others. Hopefully that made sense.
  7. by   elkpark
    Quote from FPNP
    I go to a brick and mortar NP program in WI. For gods sakes, don't call yourself a future "midlevel." That term only exists in DEA prescription authority administratively. Its a word physicians use to demean us. Don't use it.
    As I recall (and I was around that long ago), "midlevel provider" was a term insurance companies invented in order to have a single, generic term to refer collectively to PAs and all the varieties of advanced practice nurses. In my own, limited experience, I haven't heard physicians use it, and certainly not to demean anyone (of course, I realize that doesn't mean it doesn't happen).
  8. by   EKTheRN
    As I stated, I used the term "midlevel" for the lack of a better word. I wasn't sure what it is technically called, my apologies if I offended anyone. If I didn't respect the NP/PA professions, I definitely wouldn't be avidly pursuing the continuation of my education.

    I suppose I like the classic style of sitting in a lecture hall with classmates; to me, that forms a sense of community and camaraderie. Anyway. I believe it's personal preference and that's okay! To each his own. I'll continue my search for a classroom-based curriculum. Thanks for the input everyone
  9. by   Dodongo
    I go to a hybrid brick and mortar program, but I do know of a couple fully on campus programs. The University of Pittsburgh is one, but it only offers the DNP now. Vanderbilt's intensivist ACNP program is also on campus (not PNP or FNP). UCSF has an on campus FNP.

    You may also want to look into "online" programs to find out what the "online" actually means for them. Of course you have awful programs where online means you will be teaching yourself via papers and discussion boards, no exams, no hands on skills - if you can call that learning. Then there are "online" programs that are "in-person" via a Skype-like application through blackboard (where the lecture is in real-time and you can ask questions, etc), require you to come to campus for exams and skills, have proctored exams, etc. That may be more suitable for you.
  10. by   umbdude
    Quote from EKTheRN
    I suppose I like the classic style of sitting in a lecture hall with classmates; to me, that forms a sense of community and camaraderie. Anyway. I believe it's personal preference and that's okay! To each his own. I'll continue my search for a classroom-based curriculum. Thanks for the input everyone
    I'm not sure whether you are able to relocate, but Boston College is 100% in-person. You will get the community and camaraderie feel, and a lot of school spirit. Online also isn't my style. I strongly believe that, if the program is planned well, students get far more from a in-person program than online.
  11. by   MurseJJ
    Quote from EKTheRN
    As I stated, I used the term "midlevel" for the lack of a better word. I wasn't sure what it is technically called, my apologies if I offended anyone. If I didn't respect the NP/PA professions, I definitely wouldn't be avidly pursuing the continuation of my education.
    I prefer "advanced practice provider" or "APP".

    I suppose I like the classic style of sitting in a lecture hall with classmates; to me, that forms a sense of community and camaraderie. Anyway. I believe it's personal preference and that's okay! To each his own. I'll continue my search for a classroom-based curriculum. Thanks for the input everyone
    There are many in-person NP programs around the country. Here in NYC we have Columbia, NYU, Pace, LIU Brooklyn, and CUNY Hunter, in addition to a number of others in the metro area. Good luck!
  12. by   TangoDeux
    To echo many of the people on this thread, there are many Brick & Mortar nursing schools out there! I wholeheartedly agree with you that I learn better in a classic face to face B&M institution. That is my learning style, we each have different ways of learning and to understand your style and what works for you is important when trying to get a good education. Kudos to you for being aware of this and seeking an educational format that works for you.

    UCSF is a great school. Columbia, Hopkins, Simmons in Boston all are great programs.

    Yes, please don't use midlevel provider to describe our role. There was a wonderful article (can't remember where now) that discusses how the term reflects negatively on us as providers and why it shouldn't be used. Once I am licensed, I would prefer to just be called a nurse or midwife. Either one works for me.
  13. by   EKTheRN
    Thank you again everyone. Quite a few schools to add to my list! I'm single with no children so the only big pitfall to relocating (currently living in the south) would be leaving my parents and friends.

    If anyone could help me with this next I'd be extremely grateful: we've all heard the whole "PAs are trained with the medical model while NPs are trained using the nursing model" spiel. However, those of you who are practicing NPs or NP students, do you feel that your RN experience paired with your education has helped you firm your grasp on the concepts of advanced pathophysiology and pharmacology? Do you think there's something missing from MSN programs in that regard? Again, I'm working with little to no information about all of these graduate programs- no underlying rudeness intended!
  14. by   ATX77
    UT Austin has full-time in person FNP, AG-CNS, PMHNP and PNP MSN programs.

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