Becoming an NP with little to no nursing experience?? - page 34

Hello to all!!! I have worked as a parmamedic for 20 years, have a B.A. in Economics, and I wanted to advance my career in healthcare. I was originally looking to pursue the PA route, but for... Read More

  1. by   core0
    Quote from ANPFNPGNP
    So, a pediatrician would hire a PNP, an internist would hire a ANP, a family practice doctor would hire a FNP...is that right?
    In theory. However, who would an endocrinologist hire. Presumably an ANP since this is an outgrowth of internal medicine. However, the ACNP claims this as their domain also. Also what about EM. Urgent care is part of FP or EM but EM claims the emergency room (as does the ACNP). And of course the age old problem of what to do about medical specialties that cross age groups (EM again among others). The EM group that I moonlight with won't hire NPs for exactly this reason. Until it actually gets put into practice (and in all probability litigated) nobody knows.

    David Carpenter, PA-C
  2. by   ANPFNPGNP
    Quote from core0
    In theory. However, who would an endocrinologist hire. Presumably an ANP since this is an outgrowth of internal medicine. However, the ACNP claims this as their domain also. Also what about EM. Urgent care is part of FP or EM but EM claims the emergency room (as does the ACNP). And of course the age old problem of what to do about medical specialties that cross age groups (EM again among others). The EM group that I moonlight with won't hire NPs for exactly this reason. Until it actually gets put into practice (and in all probability litigated) nobody knows.

    David Carpenter, PA-C
    As long as there's a "fast track" ER, then the FNP's can do it. I noticed there is now a ACNP/FNP and a EM/FNP program at Vanderbilt. There was a EM/FNP program at UT-Houston, but they were thinking about shutting it down. The reason being, some of their graduates couldn't get licensed in other states. Believe it or not, there are states that are even more strict about educational preparation than others! I've heard that some states won't even recognize online programs, so people have to be very careful about attending these online programs and "super specialized" program.

    Until there becomes a "generalized" NP program, there will continue to be stratification among NP's.

    Presently in Texas, we're fighting for 100% independence. There's a good chance this will happen in rural areas. If so, I'm going to open my own clinic. If it weren't for that, I would have gone the PA route - I was accepted into OU's program, but ended up moving to TX so I did the Vanderbilt program.
  3. by   CraigB-RN
    All this uncertanty is one of the reasons why I dropped the NP program I'm in. If I didn't have to go back and take all those 20+ year old sciences over I'd go the PA route. Nursing is and probably always be it's own worst enemy. This is the one area were the "nusing model" fails us as nurses. None of this stuff is rocket science, there is no reason someone can't learn this stuff like PA's or even docs to. Learn as we go. As an RN I can gofrom ER to ICU and then to whatever area I want and learn on the job. Why is it considered out of scope of practice for a FNP to start someone on a levo drip. As a flight nurse I start patients on it all the time.

    More and more I'm sorry I choose to follow the RN path, I could have done better going the PA route when I had a chance. Nursing doesn't only eat it's young it contuinues to eat it's not so young.
  4. by   CraigB-RN
    Quote from ANPFNPGNP
    As long as there's a "fast track" ER, then the FNP's can do it. I noticed there is now a ACNP/FNP and a EM/FNP program at Vanderbilt. There was a EM/FNP program at UT-Houston, but they were thinking about shutting it down. The reason being, some of their graduates couldn't get licensed in other states. Believe it or not, there are states that are even more strict about educational preparation than others! I've heard that some states won't even recognize online programs, so people have to be very careful about attending these online programs and "super specialized" program.

    Until there becomes a "generalized" NP program, there will continue to be stratification among NP's.

    Presently in Texas, we're fighting for 100% independence. There's a good chance this will happen in rural areas. If so, I'm going to open my own clinic. If it weren't for that, I would have gone the PA route - I was accepted into OU's program, but ended up moving to TX so I did the Vanderbilt program.
    Hmm do you have more specifics on the states not recognizing online programs?
  5. by   ANPFNPGNP
    Quote from CraigB-RN
    Hmm do you have more specifics on the states not recognizing online programs?
    When I went to Vanderbilt, they made a point of telling us that it was not an online program, but a modified distance program with concentrated time on campus. They said there were some states that weren't accepting online NP programs and that's why they emphasized theirs wasn't online. That was back in 2003/2004, but if I remember right, Washington and Oregon may have been a couple??

    I know that UT-Houston couldn't get a couple of ER/FNP graduates licensed as FNP's in Oregon and some other NW state and that's one of the reasons they dropped the program. UT-Houston has one of the top NP programs in the nation, so they were shocked to find out those people couldn't get licensed in those states (they were already certified as FNP's). I wish everything was "nationalized," so there would be a set of educational requirements/scopes of practice for all NP's and we could move freely from state to state.

    If you want to become a NP and think you'll be moving around a lot, then go the FNP route and attend a college with a traditional program. That will cover you to practice in primary care settings in every state. There are plenty of jobs out there for FNP's!
  6. by   siegolindo
    hello all, I am interested in continuing my education by going the NP route right after achieving my BSN. I've been a paramedic for the last 6 years in NYC and feel that RN isnt going to satisfy my inner drive. what do you guys think? is it possible or should i work as an RN for x amount of years before i apply? thanks in advance
  7. by   ANPFNPGNP
    Quote from siegolindo
    hello all, I am interested in continuing my education by going the NP route right after achieving my BSN. I've been a paramedic for the last 6 years in NYC and feel that RN isnt going to satisfy my inner drive. what do you guys think? is it possible or should i work as an RN for x amount of years before i apply? thanks in advance
    Most programs are going to require a minimum of one year of RN experience, so you may not have a choice.
  8. by   indecisiveRN
    One of the 'stickies' at the top of the page is called something like "Becoming an NP with little to no experience." That is a lengthy discussion on this topic. Take a look.
  9. by   sirI
    Hello, siegolindo, and Welcome to allnurses.com

    I merged your thread with the one to which indecisiveRN referred.

    This is a very good thread to answer your questions/concerns.

    Good luck with your decision. And, we hope you enjoy allnurses.com
  10. by   JDCitizen
    Quote from siegolindo
    hello all, I am interested in continuing my education by going the NP route right after achieving my BSN. I've been a paramedic for the last 6 years in NYC and feel that RN isnt going to satisfy my inner drive. what do you guys think? is it possible or should i work as an RN for x amount of years before i apply? thanks in advance
    Hmmm I have seen some bridge programs from Paramedic to BSN...

    I went from paramedic to RN to APRN... I only had to do the two years of the Nursing program (BSN) my core was more than completed by the time I went that route..

    I took my time looking for my first APRN job... Hospital paid me a whooping dollar more an hour for my MSN..

    I would recommend at least a year of experience as an RN. Not all programs are requiring that stipulation anymore though... If you might even considering CRNA: ER or ICU will be your best bets... If you are looking at acute care NP: ER or ICU is still probably your best bet...

    You might look at the time spent as a Nurse on a floor as wasted but its good experience and also good a good networking time if done appropriately. Some hospitals are now looking at growing their own NPs from in house building up good a relationship with doctors you may be working with/for doesn't hurt either...



    Best wishes!
  11. by   EmergencyMedicine
    im not an np but ive heard nothing but encouragement to jump right in, i'm done working the street on an ambulance and want to get into an ER somwhere. Im starting here to get information and am going for CNA school starting OCT1.

    Thank you for working the streets as a medic
  12. by   ANPFNPGNP
    Quote from JDCitizen

    I took my time looking for my first APRN job... Hospital paid me a whooping dollar more an hour for my MSN..
    You only got a ONE dollar an hour raise for working as a NP in the hospital? UNBELIEVABLE! Where I live, ACNP's are making in the low 6 figures for hospitalist jobs.
  13. by   Pester1
    I am an RN with almost 2 years of experience. LTC and Clinic. I am going to go on for my BSN/MSN for NP. From what Im reading it would really benefit me to work in a hospital while Im going to school. Do you all feel the same? Can you be an effective NP without hospital experience? I love the people I work with at the clinic but I feel much more like a secretary than a nurse and I feel like my skills are slipping away. Thoughts?

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