How to handle a 3rd grade hypochondriac? - page 2

I would appreciate any advice on how to best handle this student. Student quite dramatically holds his chest and starts breathing heavily claiming he has chest pains. Comes to me clutching his... Read More

  1. by   ruby_jane
    Quote from JenTheSchoolRN
    "You have been resting in my office for xx time during which I have seen nothing that tells me you cannot be in school at the this time. Therefore, I am signing your pass and you will return to class." I have taken other options out of the equation.
    Student and I had a brief staring match, student sighed and took pass.

    Same student sat with me for observation once after telling me they had "sharp stabbing pains in every part of my body" (Vitals normal, skin color normal, etc). I did not engage them and after 10 minutes student said they were bored and I smiled, signed their pass. Student started to protest but I told student that it appears they are healthy enough to be bored in my office, so they are healthy enough to be bored in math class.
    All the YES! YES. I am stealing your words and using them. Welcome to my clinic! When there's nothing really wrong with you, we treat that with therapeutic boredom.
  2. by   kidzcare
    Quote from JenTheSchoolRN
    I did not engage them and after 10 minutes student said they were bored and I smiled, signed their pass. Student started to protest but I told student that it appears they are healthy enough to be bored in my office, so they are healthy enough to be bored in math class.
    Ah, Therapeutic Boredom (TM), the school nurse's best friend.

    When I was at the jr high I used it in spades. No conversation, no books, no devices, nada. A sick student will go to sleep. A bored student will complain.
  3. by   Amethya
    I just tell him to go back to class, or I'll call the ambulance and they will have to perform surgery... WITH NEEDLES!

    Then I call his mother so she can tell him to knock it off. 68% of my parents are Hispanics, so you always hear the mother cussing at them in Spanish and it brings a smile to my face.
  4. by   Flare
    Quote from kidzcare
    Ah, Therapeutic Boredom (TM), the school nurse's best friend.

    When I was at the jr high I used it in spades. No conversation, no books, no devices, nada. A sick student will go to sleep. A bored student will complain.
    Yaas!! i do this all the time. Turn back to my work and toil away. Once they start trying to tell me about their video games or movies or whatever it becomes clear that it's less a case of a virus and more so mathititis
  5. by   BeckyESRN
    Quote from Flare
    Yaas!! i do this all the time. Turn back to my work and toil away. Once they start trying to tell me about their video games or movies or whatever it becomes clear that it's less a case of a virus and more so mathititis
    I hear mathititis is highly contagious, especially in 4th-5th graders...
  6. by   WineRN
    It's nice to know we each have one of these this year!

    We had a meeting with the parents about the situation because she already had him thoroughly checked out (the little guy even convinced the doctor to do an upper GI!!) and he is FINE. Now he can only come to me for life threatening aliments, and he sees the counselor daily to go over techniques to better process his anxiety. It has only been around 3 weeks but it is seeming to help.
  7. by   JenTheSchoolRN
    Quote from BeckyESRN
    I hear mathititis is highly contagious, especially in 4th-5th graders...
    Oh, I heard it continues into middle school and is impossible to cure.
  8. by   sueall
    Sorry, but I just have to ask -- is this kid having any peer group or social interaction problems that would lead him to seek out positive attention at school? I know, I know, but humor the little voices in my head!
  9. by   JenTheSchoolRN
    Quote from sueall
    Sorry, but I just have to ask -- is this kid having any peer group or social interaction problems that would lead him to seek out positive attention at school? I know, I know, but humor the little voices in my head!
    While I am not the OP, I will say that, for me, this option was explored. My most recent student that visited me often was very social and had many friends - student was actively avoiding classwork, but never complained of any physical symptoms during most social times, like gym class or lunch or field trips.
  10. by   ruby_jane
    Quote from sueall
    Sorry, but I just have to ask -- is this kid having any peer group or social interaction problems that would lead him to seek out positive attention at school? I know, I know, but humor the little voices in my head!
    You are a kind and lovely person!! Sometimes it's good to listen to the voices...
  11. by   Amethya
    Quote from ruby_jane
    You are a kind and lovely person!! Sometimes it's good to listen to the voices...
    Oh yeah! I notice this too if the kid comes all the time. I do ask them if something is wrong and 9/10, they spill the beans and I comfort them.
  12. by   hppygr8ful
    Quote from sueall
    Sorry, but I just have to ask -- is this kid having any peer group or social interaction problems that would lead him to seek out positive attention at school? I know, I know, but humor the little voices in my head!
    This type of behavior when no medical problem exists always has a psych component. It is not normal for 3rd graders to express this type of anxiety. A psych consult would be in order. This type of Axis II behavior is learned from somewhere. I once had a 10 year old patient who could have a very convincing heart attack right down to the clammy sweat and color changes. Turns out the family had just moved in a grandmother with early dementia and it was causing a lot of stress for the whole family. The question is what kind of secondary gain does the student achieve through this behavior. Maybe because I am in psych I see this a bit differently. I would try to find out if there is a learning disability, bullying, problem at home before I would just dismiss the behavior.

    Hppy

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