Want to be a nurse in Doctor's Office...which degree? ASN or BSN RN? - page 2

I have ruled out hospital RN jobs due to many factors. I am interested in working in a doctor's office as a nurse. Which degree should I go for? What are the majority looking for? Thanks!... Read More

  1. Visit  gwapo profile page
    0
    Quote from mrspolly
    I am not 100% against hospital nursing, in fact, it was my first thought when I started looking into nursing as an option. I love the idea of the more challenging environment. I think I would love to work in OB or Pediatrics. I don't want to be stuck taking blood pressures and weights for the rest of my career, but I figured there may be some challenging options in nursing in the doctor's office side of things. It may just be wishful thinking on my part.

    To be honest, I was all about hospital nursing until I really started reading the comments on this site. I have read so many people talk about how miserable hospital nursing is. From the long hours, understaffed crew, mistreatment from doctors/co-workers/patients to how hard it is to find a new grad position and how stressful the shifts are. I am at a serious cross roads here!

    UGH!!!
    And all of that is true, not all the time, not in every place. so do not be discouraged. If you read a lot of these posts, you might already have realized that it will take more than just "wanting to be a nurse" to actually BE a nurse.
  2. Visit  TheCommuter profile page
    2
    Quote from mrspolly
    I am not 100% against hospital nursing, in fact, it was my first thought when I started looking into nursing as an option.
    Nursing homes in most states tend to staff with 8-hour shifts. Due to Medicare reimbursements, many of these facilities need RNs on site to work the medication carts, supervise, and/or perform the skills that are not within the LPN's scope of practice.

    If you are willing to work in a local nursing home, you could easily obtain a day job (Monday through Friday from 7:00 to 3pm or 6:00 to 2pm).
    vintagemother and NoonieRN like this.
  3. Visit  itsnowornever profile page
    0
    Quote from RNsRWe

    And I gave same

    It's the truth that it's not too common to find RNs in doctor's offices anymore, as I told you. Mostly, they hire anyone they can train to take a blood pressure, slide the little knob on the weight scale, and type data into a computer.

    Itsnowornever mentions a pain management clinic as using RNs, in large part I am sure to the IV meds that are given. Otherwise, there's just little place for nurses nowadays.

    The reasons you gave to work in a doctor's office are the same ones that any med assistant (meaning, someone who hasn't needed to go to nursing school and pass the licensing exam) has. I am just suggesting that you might not need to go through the struggle of nursing school when a MUCH shorter, MUCH cheaper certificate can be earned instead of a nursing degree/license.

    Just food for thought.
    Pain management clinics (at least here in So Cal) are small surgical clinics, so the RNs are doing PACU/Recovery work. A friend who works in one say she's busy with assessments and recovery from anesthesia all day!
  4. Visit  nursel56 profile page
    0
    Quote from itsnowornever
    Pain management clinics (at least here in So Cal) are small surgical clinics, so the RNs are doing PACU/Recovery work. A friend who works in one say she's busy with assessments and recovery from anesthesia all day.
    That's true - freestanding outpatient surgery centers, dialysis centers, and day spas that offer cosmetic procedures are a growing market, too.

    They require more skilled nurses than the traditional doctor's office jobs. When I started in ambulatory care it was common to hire licensed nurses and there were plenty of jobs. You took a little hit in pay but that was offset by the regular hours, no weekends, holidays, etc. Now I rarely see anyone but an MA in those positions.
  5. Visit  tigerlogic profile page
    2
    I know a NP who did a direct entry program and loves working at Planned Parenthood on normal hours. I know a different direct entry MHNP who works normal-ish hours 4 days a week at a small family practice with MDs doing the non-psych stuff. Just another thought.
    fromtheseaRN and hgrimmett like this.
  6. Visit  BuckyBadgerRN profile page
    0
    Clinic jobs for NURSES are far and few between in my area. They tend to hire MA's and call them nurses. Where I go its all MA's with about 3 RN's on staff to cover triage and procedures that an MA isn't allowed to do by law

    Quote from mrspolly
    I have ruled out hospital RN jobs due to many factors. I am interested in working in a doctor's office as a nurse. Which degree should I go for? What are the majority looking for?

    Thanks!
  7. Visit  dirtyhippiegirl profile page
    0
    Most of the hospital-based outpatient clinics still hire LPNs around here. The infusion, dialysis, pain, ambulatory surgery, and cancer clinics all tied to my particular hospital all hire RNs but the jobs require anywhere from 2-5 years of acute care experience, often in a specific area such as heme/onc or ICU/PACU. IR is another one that does 8-hour days but they also require pretty extensive background in ICU/PACU.

    I did pediatric private duty right out of nursing school. If you're worried about your skills atrophying, it's probably not the job for you -- but I basically made my own hours and the pay was enough to help supplement my husband's breadwinner income to make it worth going to work.
  8. Visit  RNsRWe profile page
    0
    Quote from itsnowornever
    Pain management clinics (at least here in So Cal) are small surgical clinics, so the RNs are doing PACU/Recovery work. A friend who works in one say she's busy with assessments and recovery from anesthesia all day!
    Ah. I'm the nurse manager for an ASC, and we DO use RNs (and LPNs) but I wouldn't consider hiring ANYONE who couldn't show me several years' worth of acute care experience. RNs in recovery need to know what to do, what to look for in someone "going south", and I'd never take someone fresh out of school for that. If someone does, well...I hope it works out for everyone. We're a small center and can't afford to have a newbie RN; it's the RN everyone will turn to for direction in a patient crisis.

    Anyway, by now the OP must realize what's ahead of her, at least generally speaking.
  9. Visit  mrspolly profile page
    0
    Quote from RNsRWe
    Ah. I'm the nurse manager for an ASC, and we DO use RNs (and LPNs) but I wouldn't consider hiring ANYONE who couldn't show me several years' worth of acute care experience. RNs in recovery need to know what to do, what to look for in someone "going south", and I'd never take someone fresh out of school for that. If someone does, well...I hope it works out for everyone. We're a small center and can't afford to have a newbie RN; it's the RN everyone will turn to for direction in a patient crisis.

    Anyway, by now the OP must realize what's ahead of her, at least generally speaking.
    Yes, thank you! Not exactly what I was hoping for, but I do understand. Sounds like I have two options on either end of the spectrum....
    1. Be an MA and do menial "nursing" but have a regular schedule and low-stress environment
    2. Go for the RN and work the obligitory 2-3 years FT at a hospital to gain enough experience to then possibly move on to other areas.

    I appreciate all your comments!
  10. Visit  bsyrn profile page
    0
    Most of the offices in my area hire MA's or LPN's. If you need a job soon, go the LPN route, you can always do an LPN to RN bridge if you want to continue on.
  11. Visit  One1 profile page
    0
    I agree that you might be better off with an MA training versus nursing school, I believe you will get a much broader range of job opportunities than you would as an RN, if you don't mind the lower pay. As an RN, you might be able to get hired into clinics, e.g. GI clinics, spine clinics, etc. Those might not have your desired 9-5 but usually do not include weekends and holidays. Some OR nurses seem to have a nice schedule as well, but getting into an OR job as a new nurse is not easy. I don't know how much experience is expected for the clinic jobs.
  12. Visit  SHGR profile page
    1
    Quote from mrspolly
    I am not 100% against hospital nursing, in fact, it was my first thought when I started looking into nursing as an option. I love the idea of the more challenging environment. I think I would love to work in OB or Pediatrics. I don't want to be stuck taking blood pressures and weights for the rest of my career, but I figured there may be some challenging options in nursing in the doctor's office side of things. It may just be wishful thinking on my part.

    To be honest, I was all about hospital nursing until I really started reading the comments on this site. I have read so many people talk about how miserable hospital nursing is. From the long hours, understaffed crew, mistreatment from doctors/co-workers/patients to how hard it is to find a new grad position and how stressful the shifts are. I am at a serious cross roads here!

    UGH!!!
    Maybe I do have a unicorn job but...keep in mind we are "high volume/low acuity." Meaning, our patients aren't super sick but there are a lot of them and we are busy! The number of calls in a day is astounding and in our clinic, nurses get almost all of them. It's a challenge. Say, in an ICU setting, you have two patients, even with an admit and discharge or what have you, you might have a total of 3 patients in your busy 12 hour shift; in med surg you might have 6 or 8. In our clinic, between phone calls, walk-ins, and handling patient complaints, you might deal with 50 in a day.
    NRSKarenRN likes this.
  13. Visit  gatoraims RN profile page
    0
    In my area many offices hire LPNs and MAs. They pay around 12 dollars an hour compared to LPNs at other facilities making 18 or so an hour. I however do think that they want at least a year of experience prior to hiring you in an office. RN school is hard and it takes time away from your family. It seems like I am in school, studying, or in clincials ALL the time. All but one of my children are in school so this helps. I do sometimes feel guilty for leaving the "baby" (she is 3) in pre-school but she LOVES it. Begs to go when she is at home.

    When I was looking for a job as a LPN I had the hardest time. I found one in a psych long term care facility.Most of my fellow students found jobs as LPN's in LTCs. Some of them fresh out of school got jobs Mon-Fri 6am-3pm.

    I am not sure what MA school is like.But PN school was 18 mths it cost 7000 for books and tuition. I liked working with the pts at my first job as an LPN but did not like the facility. So I decided to get my RN. I am going to try to get a night job when I graduate. This way I will be home at least Christmas morning to see the kids open their gifts and other holidays. I might be sleeping most of the day away but I will be there. Just an idea, not sure if you can do nights of not.

    No one can tell you what is best for you and your situation. However for what you want right now it might be best like others have said spend a few months becoming a MA or LPN. If you think when the kids are older that you might want to be an RN I would get your LPN, in my area having my LPN cuts a semester off of the program. Plus much of my first semester was a review of what I had learned in PN school (refreshing clinical skills, a brief review of the systems and major illnesses).

    Best of luck to you.


Nursing Jobs in every specialty and state. Visit today and find your dream job.

Top
close
close