Want to be a nurse in Doctor's Office...which degree? ASN or BSN RN? - page 2

by mrspolly

14,339 Views | 49 Comments

I have ruled out hospital RN jobs due to many factors. I am interested in working in a doctor's office as a nurse. Which degree should I go for? What are the majority looking for? Thanks!... Read More


  1. 0
    Quote from mrspolly
    Thank you to those that responded and gave great feedback. I am struggling with the decision and am exploring all possible paths. Money is not necessarily my deal-breaker. I am a SAHM now, with a BA degree. Looking to switch professions once my children are both in elementary school. As all parents can relate, I am sure, I am trying to make the best decision for our family. One I can both enjoy and won't sacrafice our family time too radically.

    I appologize if I appeared "entitled" that's not the case in the least. I am simply just trying to get to the bottom of the healthcare field. It may or may not be the correct career path for me, but it's worth asking some questions, no?

    I am interested in science, health, helping others, working with children/babies, educating others, etc. I figured nursing may be a good fit for me. I am a natural nuturer.

    I will look in Medical Assistants and continue to explore the LPN and RN routes.

    If there is no way you can work at a hospital, be an MA first. work at a clinic then pursue your RN. Hopefully, by the time you graduate, you are ready to work in a hospital. Or, the clinic you're working at just might hire you as an RN. good luck. I don't know your situation, but I guarantee you some RNs in hospitals have the same exact situation you are in right now. I had one colleague in ICU transfer to OR because the schedule was better than 3 12hr shifts. good luck.
  2. 0
    Unless your goal is advanced practice, office nursing is very difficult to find for an RN.
    I spent the majority of my career in office nursing, and it is a wonderful experience. They can bill insurance for NP's but not RNs.

    You may want to rethink the options, to work in a hospital setting for example in pediatrics could
    lead to a school nursing opportunity if the field is of interest to you. It gives a Mom friendly schedule
    that many of my nursing friends enjoyed...
  3. 0
    I am not 100% against hospital nursing, in fact, it was my first thought when I started looking into nursing as an option. I love the idea of the more challenging environment. I think I would love to work in OB or Pediatrics. I don't want to be stuck taking blood pressures and weights for the rest of my career, but I figured there may be some challenging options in nursing in the doctor's office side of things. It may just be wishful thinking on my part.

    To be honest, I was all about hospital nursing until I really started reading the comments on this site. I have read so many people talk about how miserable hospital nursing is. From the long hours, understaffed crew, mistreatment from doctors/co-workers/patients to how hard it is to find a new grad position and how stressful the shifts are. I am at a serious cross roads here!

    UGH!!!
  4. 0
    Quote from mrspolly
    I am not 100% against hospital nursing, in fact, it was my first thought when I started looking into nursing as an option. I love the idea of the more challenging environment. I think I would love to work in OB or Pediatrics. I don't want to be stuck taking blood pressures and weights for the rest of my career, but I figured there may be some challenging options in nursing in the doctor's office side of things. It may just be wishful thinking on my part.

    To be honest, I was all about hospital nursing until I really started reading the comments on this site. I have read so many people talk about how miserable hospital nursing is. From the long hours, understaffed crew, mistreatment from doctors/co-workers/patients to how hard it is to find a new grad position and how stressful the shifts are. I am at a serious cross roads here!

    UGH!!!
    And all of that is true, not all the time, not in every place. so do not be discouraged. If you read a lot of these posts, you might already have realized that it will take more than just "wanting to be a nurse" to actually BE a nurse.
  5. 2
    Quote from mrspolly
    I am not 100% against hospital nursing, in fact, it was my first thought when I started looking into nursing as an option.
    Nursing homes in most states tend to staff with 8-hour shifts. Due to Medicare reimbursements, many of these facilities need RNs on site to work the medication carts, supervise, and/or perform the skills that are not within the LPN's scope of practice.

    If you are willing to work in a local nursing home, you could easily obtain a day job (Monday through Friday from 7:00 to 3pm or 6:00 to 2pm).
    vintagemother and NoonieRN like this.
  6. 0
    Quote from RNsRWe

    And I gave same

    It's the truth that it's not too common to find RNs in doctor's offices anymore, as I told you. Mostly, they hire anyone they can train to take a blood pressure, slide the little knob on the weight scale, and type data into a computer.

    Itsnowornever mentions a pain management clinic as using RNs, in large part I am sure to the IV meds that are given. Otherwise, there's just little place for nurses nowadays.

    The reasons you gave to work in a doctor's office are the same ones that any med assistant (meaning, someone who hasn't needed to go to nursing school and pass the licensing exam) has. I am just suggesting that you might not need to go through the struggle of nursing school when a MUCH shorter, MUCH cheaper certificate can be earned instead of a nursing degree/license.

    Just food for thought.
    Pain management clinics (at least here in So Cal) are small surgical clinics, so the RNs are doing PACU/Recovery work. A friend who works in one say she's busy with assessments and recovery from anesthesia all day!
  7. 0
    Quote from itsnowornever
    Pain management clinics (at least here in So Cal) are small surgical clinics, so the RNs are doing PACU/Recovery work. A friend who works in one say she's busy with assessments and recovery from anesthesia all day.
    That's true - freestanding outpatient surgery centers, dialysis centers, and day spas that offer cosmetic procedures are a growing market, too.

    They require more skilled nurses than the traditional doctor's office jobs. When I started in ambulatory care it was common to hire licensed nurses and there were plenty of jobs. You took a little hit in pay but that was offset by the regular hours, no weekends, holidays, etc. Now I rarely see anyone but an MA in those positions.
  8. 2
    I know a NP who did a direct entry program and loves working at Planned Parenthood on normal hours. I know a different direct entry MHNP who works normal-ish hours 4 days a week at a small family practice with MDs doing the non-psych stuff. Just another thought.
    fromtheseaRN and hgrimmett like this.
  9. 0
    Clinic jobs for NURSES are far and few between in my area. They tend to hire MA's and call them nurses. Where I go its all MA's with about 3 RN's on staff to cover triage and procedures that an MA isn't allowed to do by law

    Quote from mrspolly
    I have ruled out hospital RN jobs due to many factors. I am interested in working in a doctor's office as a nurse. Which degree should I go for? What are the majority looking for?

    Thanks!
  10. 0
    Most of the hospital-based outpatient clinics still hire LPNs around here. The infusion, dialysis, pain, ambulatory surgery, and cancer clinics all tied to my particular hospital all hire RNs but the jobs require anywhere from 2-5 years of acute care experience, often in a specific area such as heme/onc or ICU/PACU. IR is another one that does 8-hour days but they also require pretty extensive background in ICU/PACU.

    I did pediatric private duty right out of nursing school. If you're worried about your skills atrophying, it's probably not the job for you -- but I basically made my own hours and the pay was enough to help supplement my husband's breadwinner income to make it worth going to work.


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