If BSN's are preferred, then make that min requirement for NCLEX

  1. 0
    It seems to me that if the "elites" in nursing really prefer BSN's, then they should insist that the National Council make a BSN a minimum requirement to qualify to take NCLEX.

    Will this ever happen?

    PS: I'm an ADN'er new grad (in an RN>BSN program) just hired by a hospital.
  2. 17 Comments so far...

  3. 0
    I also am a new RN going for the BSN. I agree that in the future they will be making it a BSN minimum. What I believe is stopping them is there there are still a ton of rural areas where there are no places for students to get a BSN, just a diploma. I am lucky living in the north east where we have some of the biggest hospitals and colleges, but I spent a ton of money to get my RN, had to drive to a local college etc. Some areas do not have those advantages.
  4. 2
    There are people who would like to do just that. Be careful what you wish for.
    RunBabyRN and Not_A_Hat_Person like this.
  5. 1
    I graduated with an ADN and a previous bachelors and experience as a CNA, LPN and in phlebotomy---can't find a job at all. If they want only BSN, then in a sense I also wish they'd just make it a BSN program. I feel like I wasted 3 years on pre-reqs and school to get no job.

    A CPA needs 5 years of college to sit for that exam, are numbers more important than lives?
    mso819 likes this.
  6. 2
    For the record, where I live, ADNs have no trouble finding employment, at least in the hospital setting as floor nurses. Because of this, I see the ADN option as a great way to start work quickly, and gain experience while working on my RN-BSN so more grad school opportunities are available once I do have my BSN. Apparently, this isn't the case everywhere, though.
    mso819 and kylee_adns like this.
  7. 1
    I don't think it will happen, deebaxster because there is a pending nursing shortage coming up with many nurses retiring and baby boomers needing healthcare.
    mso819 likes this.
  8. 1
    This has been a controversy in nursing for the last few decades, but 'organized' nursing (an oxymoron?) could never reach an agreement. It seems that the decision has been taken out of our hands by employers based on well established patient outcome research that links significant improvement in patient outcomes with higher percentages of BSN staff.

    I have not heard of any similar research findings for non-acute care environments, so they do not have the pressure to upgrade educational levels at this point. Maybe that will change in the future, but for now ADN & Diploma nurses still make up the majority of their RN staff.

    I only wish that nursing schools would do a better job of informing potential students. Maybe they (schools) are just ignoring and hoping it will go away?
    RunBabyRN likes this.
  9. 0
    Supposedly the market will explode within the next few years ... at which point all of the ADNs will be able to find jobs much easier (heck, even us BSNs are having trouble right now). Certain hospitals (those associated with universities, research, magnet status, etc.) will always prefer candidates with higher degrees ... because they value the education, research, etc. that go along with higher degrees. Just the way it is.
  10. 2
    I completely understand the value of a higher degree, but I can't get one if I can't find an RN job to help me pay for the BSN degree! Oh well....it'll happen eventually.
    mso819 and richmay like this.
  11. 1
    Quote from Nspirit
    I don't think it will happen, deebaxster because there is a pending nursing shortage coming up with many nurses retiring and baby boomers needing healthcare.
    I hear this alot.......

    but i have yet to actually SEE this happening. Im very interested to see if this will in fact happen.
    SL2014 likes this.


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