Education of nurses

  1. 2
    Now I know this may upset some but...
    I think that all nurses should be BSN prepared at minimum, and all LPN, ASN, and diploma programs should be eradicated.
    My reasoning for this? How many other fields can say they are "professionals" with less than an associate degree? Education is never a bad thing and the more education one has, the better. I believe nurses would be seen as more professional, and there would be less people trying to get into the field as a "fast and easy way to make decent money" as many nursing programs advertise. Perhaps then, nurses would see better wages and easier opportunites to find employment.

    I would love to hear what others think on this topic. I turly hope this goes into effect in the near future!
    sherri12 and lindarn like this.
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  3. 65 Comments so far...

  4. 1
    Don't hold your breath, it will never happen.
    prettymica likes this.
  5. 16
    Quote from pcu_rn9
    now i know this may upset some but...
    i think that all nurses should be bsn prepared at minimum, and all lpn, asn, and diploma programs should be eradicated.
    my reasoning for this? how many other fields can say they are "professionals" with less than an associate degree? education is never a bad thing and the more education one has, the better. i believe nurses would be seen as more professional, and there would be less people trying to get into the field as a "fast and easy way to make decent money" as many nursing programs advertise. perhaps then, nurses would see better wages and easier opportunites to find employment.

    i would love to hear what others think on this topic. i turly hope this goes into effect in the near future!
    yipee. we've never had this discussion before.

    i'm one of those "unprofessional" nurses who graduated from a diploma program 27y ago. yes, i happen to be doing a bsn completion program, but i don't think having a bsn is necessarily a guarantee of being regard more professionally, nor would it be a guarantee that the nurses would be more professional. there's a lot to be said for knowing what you are doing and comporting yourself appropriately.

    i agree there should be one entry-level into nursing, but i am not going to be dismissive of my co-workers who are lpns, adns and diploma nurses like myself. to me, that is unprofessional.
    elkpark, KimberlyRN89, patty89, and 13 others like this.
  6. 4
    Quote from realnursealso/LPN
    Don't hold your breath, it will never happen.
    No? How many diploma programs are there anymore? What is happening to the masters level NP programs?

    The BSN level of education will be the standard entry level of education for registered nurses in the future, just as the ASN is the standard now.

    The AACN, NCSBN, ANA, NLN and others have already agreed on this subject and have put into motion long term interventions to make the BSN the standard.

    LPNs are a different subject.
  7. 7
    i suspect that hospitals that are requiring nurses to go back to complete their bsns are really targeting older staff, who probably graduated from diploma/adn programs. it's a great way to weed out staff who are making higher wages as well as getting rid of older staff who may not move as fast as a 22y old. i doubt it has all that much to do with wanting to have a more educated staff. many facilities don't even pay more for a bsn. it does look good if the hospital is going for magnet to have a mostly bsn staff.
    nursel56, mama_d, LockportRN, and 4 others like this.
  8. 3
    Quote from OCNRN63

    Yipee. We've never had this discussion before.

    I'm one of those "unprofessional" nurses who graduated from a diploma program 27y ago. Yes, I happen to be doing a BSN completion program, but I don't think having a BSN is necessarily a guarantee of being regard more professionally, nor would it be a guarantee that the nurses would be more professional. There's a lot to be said for knowing what you are doing and comporting yourself appropriately.

    I agree there should be one entry-level into nursing, but I am not going to be dismissive of my co-workers who are LPNs, ADNs and diploma nurses like myself. To me, that is unprofessional.
    You must admit that the education you received in the 80's is not adequate for what registered nursing has become today. No one wants to eradicate diploma nurses, ASNs, or LPNs. The goal is to change the future standard of education to better prepare students for the future as registered nursing becomes more and more advanced.
  9. 3
    A hundred years ago...ok 1970 when I got my LPN and again in 1982 when I got my ADN this was a hot topic of discussion. I truly feel if SOMEONE would make a decision, set a date, provide some sort of "grandfather" clause nursing would be in a better place, nurses would make more $$ and would have better job opportunities all around. I blame this nondecision on that fact that nursing is female dominated and we as females used to be taught to accept and agree to whatever was told to us.
    KimberlyRN89, pseudomonas, and lindarn like this.
  10. 0
    There are plenty of professionals without a bachelor's degree--many technical programs are two years or less. A lot of professionals don't have degrees at all, especially in the tech realm. So that's not the greatest argument ever.

    Right now most units delegate less-skilled duties. This is a cost-saving mechanism. It doesn't make fiscal sense to have a BSN to cover everything from a.m. care to passing trays to passing meds for every patient, and safety is generally not compromised by doing so. Or do you think it is?
  11. 1
    Quote from onetiredmomma
    A hundred years ago...ok 1970 when I got my LPN and again in 1982 when I got my ADN this was a hot topic of discussion. I truly feel if SOMEONE would make a decision, set a date, provide some sort of "grandfather" clause nursing would be in a better place, nurses would make more $$ and would have better job opportunities all around. I blame this nondecision on that fact that nursing is female dominated and we as females used to be taught to accept and agree to whatever was told to us.
    The decision has been made already and the plan has already been enacted. You cannot just turn off all the ASN programs or fire all the LPNs and Diploma nurses. What you can do though is increase the amount of RN-BSN programs, increase the amount of BSN grants, and put into motion recommendations for hospitals to hire BSN nurses. First it was "BSN preferred" then it will be "BSN required."

    These changes happen over years if not decades. Again I reference the diploma RN, how many new diploma programs do you see?
    lindarn likes this.
  12. 3
    Quote from futurehomebirthcnm
    There are plenty of professionals without a bachelor's degree--many technical programs are two years or less. A lot of professionals don't have degrees at all, especially in the tech realm. So that's not the greatest argument ever.

    Right now most units delegate less-skilled duties. This is a cost-saving mechanism. It doesn't make fiscal sense to have a BSN to cover everything from a.m. care to passing trays to passing meds for every patient, and safety is generally not compromised by doing so. Or do you think it is?
    I think you are using the layman definition of profession that is less defined and more closely resembles the term vocation. A profession, as known in the professional and academic world, has a more specific definition and set of requirements. In order for an occupation to be a profession it must have certain traits such as self regulation and a uniform standard of education for entry into the profession, among other things. Nursing lacks a standard of education, something that MDs, lawyers, and the like have.

    There actually are studies that demonstrate that a higher level of education provides a safer level of care. With the new Medicare rules even rare mistakes can be extremely costly.
    pseudomonas, ORoxyO, and lindarn like this.


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