Sleeping Nurse = No Agency? - pg.3 | allnurses

Sleeping Nurse = No Agency? - page 3

We have (my husband and I on separate occasions) caught one of our night nurses sleeping. The first time it happened, DH saw her on the baby monitor (I was already knocked out!) and he didn't say... Read More

  1. Visit  nurseaig profile page
    #26 0
    When U works nights one needs a break. Even if it is half a hour. By law. Who in their right mind can work a 8 hour shift without a break? And talking about the hospital, We do get breaks.
  2. Visit  nurseaig profile page
    #27 0
    I use to work as a PDN and the family was very nice. I work 12 hour shifts and they would make sure I got my break to take my nap. How could U function without a break. And the OP should know better being a nurse and all. How would the OP like to go to her job and work without getting a break?
  3. Visit  JustBeachyNurse profile page
    #28 3
    Quote from nurseaig
    When U works nights one needs a break. Even if it is half a hour. By law. Who in their right mind can work a 8 hour shift without a break? And talking about the hospital, We do get breaks.
    Not in all states unless you are under the age of 18 or belong to a union. A break does not = take a nap. Home care/private duty is different. These are pediatric clients that require constant monitoring. If you cannot work 8 or 12 hours without a break then this is not the best choice for you. There is down time but you are paid for all hours worked. The only exception is a 24 hour shift you are paid for 16 hours but not the 8 hours you are entitled to/expected to sleep.

    The hospital or other facility is different there is a nurse you report off to and he/she cares for your patient while you are off unit. You usually are not paid for your break. Most facilities do not permit/condone staff sleeping on break.

    This situation is also referring to a nurse sleeping for more than a half hour while a medically fragile client who requires direct monitoring is left unattended.
  4. Visit  ventmommy profile page
    #29 4
    Quote from nurseaig
    I use to work as a PDN and the family was very nice. I work 12 hour shifts and they would make sure I got my break to take my nap. How could U function without a break. And the OP should know better being a nurse and all. How would the OP like to go to her job and work without getting a break?

    Over my dead body would I allow a nurse to sleep on a break. I would make sure that someone was with my son so the nurse could heat up her food. If you can't handle 8-12 hours of private duty then you have no business taking that job.
  5. Visit  JustBeachyNurse profile page
    #30 5
    Here is a reference to state laws regarding rest & meal breaks:

    http://www.dol.gov/whd/state/rest.htm

    http://www.dol.gov/whd/state/meal.htm


    For most industries (transportation is one of the few with regulations requiring rest breaks for safety reasons) there is NO mandatory break (rest or meal) requirement per federal law (only 7 or 8 states have requirements for adults, minors are different). The only federal labor rule is if your break is less than 20 min you must be paid for it.

    If one cannot stay awake overnight then perhaps reconsider working overnights. If you worked NICU and were paid for your break since you had to be available to respond for a patient emergency would you use your break for a nap? Would you take a nap if you were an insomniac that worked day shift?

    The whole point of an overnight PDNs is someone to stay awake and monitor/care for a medical fragile or technology dependent client. I can't see ever consider taking a nap while on duty...
  6. Visit  nursel56 profile page
    #31 4
    Quote from nurseaig
    I use to work as a PDN and the family was very nice. I work 12 hour shifts and they would make sure I got my break to take my nap. How could U function without a break. And the OP should know better being a nurse and all. How would the OP like to go to her job and work without getting a break?
    So a family member had to get up in the middle of the night for a half-hour while you sleep for a half-hour? I've never heard of anything like that before and I think it would be disruptive to the family's sleep schedule to do that.

    Night shifters in hospitals don't typically get a half-hour to sleep. The physical demands on your body are much less with one patient. You can usually read or study while monitoring your patient. I think most of us find the trade to be worth it.
  7. Visit  LadyFree28 profile page
    #32 5
    Nursel56 and JustBeachyRN hit the nail on the head.

    I get appalled at how many nurses use night shift as a means to "get paid while you sleep." And I did nights for MANY years as a PDN..and as recent as last year, while I studied for the NCLEX (I was a LPN)...I would rotate shifts, depending on my cases. I understand how it could be hard, I totally do, however, this is NOT the position where even a "sleeping break" is allowed. I found myself reading, studying, playing on my iPhone to keep me busy during down time. There are too many quiet activities available...iPhones, iPads, kindles, good books, knitting, sketching, puzzles, etc. that can help with PDN downtime.
  8. Visit  CloudySue profile page
    #33 4
    I have never received a break working PDN. The idea has never even been breached, by anyone. That being said, I've never had a client where I didn't have copious amounts of down time anyway. I always have time to sit and eat my packed lunch. In rare moments when I have that "falling asleep at the wheel" feeling, I sit up in my chair, set my phone alarm for 5 minutes, and close my eyes. I've done this maybe 2-3 times ever. All I need is a tiny blip of sleep to feel recharged, just like turning off and restarting a computer right away. It's not ideal of course, but it's a survival technique that prevents me from dozing indefinitely.

    It's best to know oneself and how they can deal with working overnights. You need to know what works best for you, and develop a sleep schedule that works best for you and then stick with it. You can't burn your candle at both ends, and I suspect that's what work-sleepers do. I work full time 7 months of the year and I stay strictly on overnight living, even on my days off. If I try to diverge from that schedule I get messed up. During the other 5 months of the year, I work weekend nights only, so I stay up until 2am Friday, sleep in on Saturday, take a 2 hr nap early Sat evening, and then pull the all-nighter with extra coffee. I sleep all day Sunday, and then do my Sunday night no problem. But then, I only allow myself about 5 hours of sleep Monday, then go back to bed at a normal evening time. And then I'm back to day living for 5 days.

    Now, I'm a good sleeper and I can flip flop my circadian rhythm quite easily, so I'm lucky that way. I'd make a good flight attendant. Some people just can't mess around around the clock w their sleep like that. A person that HAS to take a nap, or sleep for hours during their shift really has no business considering overnight shifts at all.
    Last edit by CloudySue on May 21, '13
  9. Visit  BuckyBadgerRN profile page
    #34 4
    Quote from LadyFree28
    Nursel56 and JustBeachyRN hit the nail on the head.

    I get appalled at how many nurses use night shift as a means to "get paid while you sleep." And I did nights for MANY years as a PDN..and as recent as last year, while I studied for the NCLEX (I was a LPN)...I would rotate shifts, depending on my cases. I understand how it could be hard, I totally do, however, this is NOT the position where even a "sleeping break" is allowed. I found myself reading, studying, playing on my iPhone to keep me busy during down time. There are too many quiet activities available...iPhones, iPads, kindles, good books, knitting, sketching, puzzles, etc. that can help with PDN downtime.
    I do PDN night work with a sweet little girl. Once she's asleep I break out my laptop (slight pinterest addiction), pop in a DVD, read my Nook, do crossword puzzles, etc. The day nurse who relieves me makes fun of my bags (purse, messenger bag will all nursing related items and a tote for my "stay awake" activities. Um, yeah, I don't get to interact with her for 10 hours like you do, so I need to do something to pass the time!
  10. Visit  smartnurse1982 profile page
    #35 0
    Interesting topic.

    Mine is a twist: What if the parents provide you with a bed to sleep in?

    Can you still sleep?

    Also,about breaks.
    Why dont we pdn get breaks?
    In Nj its mandated,you neen at least 1/2 hr break per8 hrs of work.
    i
  11. Visit  JustBeachyNurse profile page
    #36 1
    Quote from smartnurse1982
    Interesting topic.

    Mine is a twist: What if the parents provide you with a bed to sleep in?

    Can you still sleep?

    Also,about breaks.
    Why dont we pdn get breaks?
    In Nj its mandated,you neen at least 1/2 hr break per8 hrs of work.
    i
    There is NO mandated break in NJ unless you are under the age of 18. The only mandate is that if your break is less than 20 min you must be paid as quoted above from federal labor law .

    If the family gives you a bed and you are working less than 16 hours you need to check with your agency. Generally if working less than 16 hours and you are caught sleeping = patient abandonment.
  12. Visit  urbanngrrl_hello profile page
    #37 1
    Quote from JustBeachyNurse
    Generally if working less than 16 hours and you are caught sleeping = patient abandonment.
    To clarify, in most state's Nurse Practice Acts and BoN position statements, patient abandonmentis is leaving the area of assignment prior to the completion of the shift. Sleeping in an area of assignment is unprofessional conduct. An agency policy might define things differently, but that doesn't mean the BoN is going to agree.

    Arguing with a supervisor might be grounds for termination and not the best conduct to advance a career But the BoN is not going to discipline a nurse's license for "Unprofessional Conduct" for arguing with a boss behind closed doors. In the same way, just because one's opinion or policy manual equates sleeping with abandonment, it does not mean the BoN is going to discipline a nurse for "Patient Abandonment" for falling asleep at the bedside.

    One of the best tricks for sleeping I ever saw was a nurse who slept with a bottle of Visine in her hands folded in her lap. When caught, she would claim, "My eyes are sore. Allergies I guess. I just put in some drops and was keeping the lids closed for a minute."
  13. Visit  nursel56 profile page
    #38 0
    Quote from smartnurse1982
    Interesting topic.

    Mine is a twist: What if the parents provide you with a bed to sleep in?

    Can you still sleep?

    Also,about breaks.
    Why dont we pdn get breaks?
    In Nj its mandated,you neen at least 1/2 hr break per8 hrs of work.
    I've seen that happen with adult clients who were verbal and even been offered a bed to sleep on but I never sleep anyway. If you fall asleep and don't hear an alarm or a call from the patient the fact that they offered you a place to sleep will have no effect on your responsibility for your patient.

    When there was a constant staffing crunch this would happen as many nurses worked both day and night shifts. As far as the break thing - if you are the only person there with a patient who cannot be left alone I don't see how it would be possible to have a half-hour break, so there may be written exceptions in state laws.

    I recall once I was asked to sign a "meal waiver" but having worked years in pdn it only happened once in my state so I doubt that is mandatory.

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