Any Other Math Phobia's Out There???

  1. Ok, my fear of math had kept me from going to college for years. I simply never "got" a lot of math back in my day. I graduated high school in 1970 and was passed in High School Algebra with a d- (I think they just wanted to get rid of me). I took the compass test at college a year ago and only scored a 28 on the pre-algebra part. I studied and retook the compass test in Oct of 2006 - brought that 28 up to 73 (again pre-algebra). I know in the LPN program at school there is pharmacology (that doesn't bother me) however there is no other math to take. I am now thinking, what the heck, I'm just going to go ahead and go for the RN program. I will have to take Math 065 (Basic Albegra with Measurement) and then either take MT 110 (applied math) or have to take Math 120 (intermediate Algebra and then Math 150 (college algebra). Well, in order to cut out one of the math classes, I have already decided to take the Math 110, Applied Math after taking math 065. How hard is applied Math? Blessings to all!:angel2:
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  2. 9 Comments

  3. by   WDWpixieRN
    I'm not familiar with the specific math classes as you have them titled, but I'll tell you my story...

    I graduated in '74 with a D in algebra (I think they wanted to get rid of me, too, lol)....fast forward to 1994, when I decided to get a degree -- any degree....I tested in to what they call Basic Math at my local CC...I was a bit aggravated as that meant I would need to take FOUR semesters of math to finish College Algebra which was the requirement....but a friend's sister who's a high school math teacher encouraged me and said that I needed to get my foundation solid before I could move on...so I started with that class ("A"), then on to Elementary Algebra ("A"), Intermediate Algebra ("A"), then College Algebra ("B", because I took a few days off to take a trip with a school group and missed logarithms, lol)...one night I was at a tutoring session on-campus and heard a gal say she hadn't had math in 10 years and was back taking "Survey of Calculus" to get in to a Master's program...well, I figured since I was on a roll and still had another semester there, I would take it also....got a "B"....I also took a Statistics class when I was getting my bachelor's in Information Systems ("B")

    I wouldn't tell you that I could recreate those grades if you put a test in front of me today, but I will tell you that starting from the basics and moving through them in order helped it all make sense....I actually ENJOYED the math as a break from my other classes as it was so black and white, while English, Communications, etc., was so subjective....

    In addition, taking those classes has made most of nursing dosage look like a piece of cake....I think being older and understanding there's a real purpose to your math at this point makes a difference....I think I enjoy school so much more than I did as a kid back in the 70's....and I think you'll do fine...don't let the past freak you out....I know my priorities were WAY different back then!! :roll
  4. by   MIKelly
    Fear of Math and research papers kept me out of college when I graduated high school. When I took the compass test for my college I only got 17% on the algebra. I had no idea I was going to be tested or I may have refreshed a little. I took the Hesi entrance exam in January and bought some 6th grade math workbooks to practice with (I scored 94% in the math portion). It covered some basic Algebra stuff. At my college there isn't even a math course required at all for the RN nursing degree! I will need to learn dosing calcuations, but that must be covered in the actual nursing classes. There isn't even a seperate pharmacology course in the nursing program either. I think you are freaking yourself out for nothing, I did so much better with math now, at the age of 35 then I did in high school. It's so different when you are PAYING for the grade! Plus I think it's easier to understand. Or maybe my husband is a better teacher than I had in high school .
  5. by   lookingforward
    YES! THAT's ME! I am so glad I am not alone in the world! My situation is soooooooo amusing, if not unbelievable! I myself am not a "math" person having had to start CC with basic math. I thought I was doing so well that I took the next level of math with same instructor, and I thought I was "getting" it when towards the end of the semester I realized that the instructor was just "passing" me! I ended up taking two math classes and just being "passed". Guess what? Now in my attempts to take the LAST math class needed to enter RN program, and I am TOTALLY LOST. So here is where my phobia lies! I've had to drop twice and I am so scared of this algebra that I'm even thinking RE-TAKING the PRE-ALGEBRA again! I know if you apply yourself and do some self studying you will GET IT! If necessary please don't be afraid to take a "pre" class all over again, heaven knows you will not be ALONE! Thanks for reading!
  6. by   prmenrs
    We have a whole sticky w/math help sites:

    http://allnurses.com/forums/f198/mat...ks-120539.html

    So you can see you're not alone!! Start w/the first math class you'll need. Get the book early, and get going! Find the first "example problem". Copy it from the book, find a problem similar to it in the "exercises" and try to work it. Keep doing that till you feel confident. Which WILL happen!!!

    If you run into something you don't "get", post it and we'll help. Don't expect an "ahaaa" moment--it's more like a rheostat turning on--and you do it by practicing.

    Hang in there!!
  7. by   catzy5
    Quote from mammaoftwo
    Ok, my fear of math had kept me from going to college for years. I simply never "got" a lot of math back in my day. I graduated high school in 1970 and was passed in High School Algebra with a d- (I think they just wanted to get rid of me). I took the compass test at college a year ago and only scored a 28 on the pre-algebra part. I studied and retook the compass test in Oct of 2006 - brought that 28 up to 73 (again pre-algebra). I know in the LPN program at school there is pharmacology (that doesn't bother me) however there is no other math to take. I am now thinking, what the heck, I'm just going to go ahead and go for the RN program. I will have to take Math 065 (Basic Albegra with Measurement) and then either take MT 110 (applied math) or have to take Math 120 (intermediate Algebra and then Math 150 (college algebra). Well, in order to cut out one of the math classes, I have already decided to take the Math 110, Applied Math after taking math 065. How hard is applied Math? Blessings to all!:angel2:

    My best advise is to take all the recomended maths in order. You will pick it up easier now that you are older and have better study habits, I too was a math aphobe and never had much math in my day. I studied for the assesment with a book called "all the math you will ever need to know" by Slavin it was GREAT so easy to understand and really gave you a good foundation for the basics, I litterally started with multiplication and worked my way up to algebra, then I took a pre algebra course at school and intermediate algebra, gave me so much more confidence in myself after doing that.
  8. by   catzy5
    Quote from prmenrs
    We have a whole sticky w/math help sites:

    http://allnurses.com/forums/f198/mat...ks-120539.html

    So you can see you're not alone!! Start w/the first math class you'll need. Get the book early, and get going! Find the first "example problem". Copy it from the book, find a problem similar to it in the "exercises" and try to work it. Keep doing that till you feel confident. Which WILL happen!!!

    If you run into something you don't "get", post it and we'll help. Don't expect an "ahaaa" moment--it's more like a rheostat turning on--and you do it by practicing.

    Hang in there!!

    I agree the key to math is starting off where you need to be and then repitition over and over and over keep doing them till your dreaming them LOL.
  9. by   curlysue82
    Hey guys! I hate to detour off the subject but I am also in the same situation. I am currently in basic math and will be going into elem. algebra next. Do you think it would be a good idea to take the elem. algebra during the summer semester? I believe it is all crammed into 11 weeks.
  10. by   RNwntaB
    Quote from catzy5
    I agree the key to math is starting off where you need to be and then repitition over and over and over keep doing them till your dreaming them LOL.
    Too funny! I did dream about my Algebra problems last semester! I took Intro to Algebra, now I'm taking Intermed. Algebra....
    I remember telling my husband about my dreams of Ab+Bc=D....etc! It was very exhausting!
    To the OP:
    I am only taking one class at a time right now. As far as math goes, I take one problem at a time! I don't look ahead! My classes have been on-line so I've really not had any help. I remember "flinging" my books across the floor one night because I just didn't get "it".....Well, to my surprise, I got a 100% on that exam! I still don't get "it"!
    My advice is to just start! Don't worry about "where" you have to start, just be proud of yourself for starting!! Do the best you can and don't compare yourself to anyone else!!
    Best wishes!!
  11. by   catzy5
    Quote from curlysue82
    Hey guys! I hate to detour off the subject but I am also in the same situation. I am currently in basic math and will be going into elem. algebra next. Do you think it would be a good idea to take the elem. algebra during the summer semester? I believe it is all crammed into 11 weeks.

    11 weeks isn't that short a typical semester here is 16 weeks so really 11 weeks is a little bit shorter, so I guess what I am gong to say is if you have the time to devote to doing outside studying after going to school for a condensed amount of time yes. for example here a typical summer math course would be 6-8weeks mon-thurs 8am till 12pm. so if your not working or caring for kids during the summer you should have plenty of time for study, however if you have other obligations you need to consider that. I have used the rule of thumb of 2 hours for every 1 hour of class for outside study time.

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