The cheerleading is NOT helpful

  1. I'm very laid back, easy to get along with, pretty much can get along with anyone, but I've been at a new place for 3 weeks and mostly it's ok, tho they do some things kinda weird (like the whole unit running into the room for EVERY d-cel) but, wow, I wanted to ring this girl's neck, and our personalities are clashing BIG TIME>

    She busted into my patients room after knocking VERY loudly and shouts. HIIII (in a squeaky obnoxious voice) I'm ______I'm here to catch your baby" and then immediately comes over to the bed where myself and the midwife are pushing with the patient and starts CHEERING "PUSHHHHH, PUSHHHHHH" and CLAPPING HER HANDS, I kid you not! I looked at the midwife and we both turned around and GLARED at her.

    Mind you this patient was going natural, we had the lights dim, we had a very good environment going on and she ruined it all. Mind you we were NOT close to delivery, far from it. I never even called out for help.

    She proceeded to STAY in the room for a few minutes, we did NOT need her help and finally I said, "Uhm, I'm good, I'll call when I'm ready" and she got SOOOO offended.

    She has an attitude and a chip on her shoulder and she is sooooo incompetent, she said she's been an L&D nurse for 5 years but she just graduated.

    I had to "orient" with her, and granted, I only get 1 day of orientation becuase I'm a traveler, all I needed to be shown was the computer system and wehre they kept their "stuff" i'm pretty keen on the aspects of birth, etc. And she couldnt' keep her mouth shut or get out of my way or anything.

    I really am not good at confronting people and I dont want to make any waves, but this girl is really going to be a problem if she keeps busting into my rooms and acting like that.

    I'm really just venting here and for anyone who managed to read all this, please vent with me about obnoxious, unhelpful coworkers
    •  
  2. 18 Comments

  3. by   sunnyjohn
    Quote from waterfall99
    ....
    She busted into my patients room after knocking VERY loudly and shouts. HIIII (in a squeaky obnoxious voice) I'm ______I'm here to catch your baby" and then immediately comes over to the bed where myself and the midwife are pushing with the patient and starts CHEERING "PUSHHHHH, PUSHHHHHH" and CLAPPING HER HANDS, I kid you not! I looked at the midwife and we both turned around and GLARED at her.

    ......
    What the H*&* ????
    If I were in labour and some dingbat started doing this I woulda' got up and smacked her....

    "HELLO MY NAME IS SUNNY! I'M HEAR TO SMACK the Cheerleader outta' you!"
  4. by   waterfall99
    Quote from sunnyjohn
    What the H*&* ????
    If I were in labour and some dingbat started doing this I woulda' got up and smacked her....

    "HELLO MY NAME IS SUNNY! I'M HEAR TO SMACK the Cheerleader outta' you!"
    LOL, I ONLY WISH the patient would have said something! Sadly, i don't even think she noticed, but I sure did!
  5. by   mitchsmom
    I feel your pain... I try to gauge my approach depending on the patient and the situation and I don't really get into aggressive coaching unless I think the mom wants or needs it but I hear some people screaming PUSH! from down the hall.

    Is there any way you could have corraled her and whispered that the patient wanted a more subdued/quiet environment? Or would it have been fruitless to try??
    Or how do you think she'd respond if you just let it come up in conversation... "everyone has different styles, I just have kind of a quieter approach with my patients that seems to work well for us" (hint hint) etc etc.

    She was probably well-intentioned but you'd think she would have NOTICED the setting/mood when she entered the room and surveyed the scene!

    Does the midwife you were with, or any co-workers have any suggestions for dealing with this person? Is there anyone you trust to tell what you just wrote here to us?
    Last edit by mitchsmom on Dec 1, '06
  6. by   SmilingBluEyes
    I have found many laboring women are REALLY turned off by noxious stimuli, including perfume and noise. And loud, sing-songy nurses' voices are at the top of the list. I model quite and calm behavior. When a woman is entering active labor, I lower my voice, talking only when necessary, or when the mom talks to me, I move stealthily and quietly--- and dim the lights. I find the families and staff who follow me, mimic this. It creates a much more calming and soothing environment for the laboring mom and family. Perhaps you can model this to this person, or politely remind her how excess stimui really irritate and upset laboring women? Just a suggestion.
  7. by   Cherish
    HA This reminds me of the episode of Sex in the City (BIG FAN). When Miranda gives birth and Carrie promises her no cheerleading, and Steve no crying or fainting. Well here comes miss happy blonde cheerleading nurse and shes all cheering, "PUSH, PUSH.." in a very annoying voice. Miranda looks at Carrie, Carrie looks at the Nurse and says stop its not helping. She does it again, when the baby is born while counting the toes and yells at her. It was pretty funny. But yea...cheerleading while giving birth...not a help...
  8. by   RNfromMN
    how about a clinical instructor that made us do a different type of cheer (that we had to come up with) "just like they do at walmart!" in pre-conference every day before we got out on the floor.

    yeah, people like this need to be shot. and they all look at you like they're going to cry when you let them know you're not as "jazzed" up about something as they are...so don't worry about offending her.
  9. by   Multicollinearity
    Quote from jessica 392
    how about a clinical instructor that made us do a different type of cheer (that we had to come up with) "just like they do at walmart!" in pre-conference every day before we got out on the floor.


    a cheer like at walmart?!
  10. by   Spidey's mom
    Quote from SmilingBluEyes
    I have found many laboring women are REALLY turned off by noxious stimuli, including perfume and noise. And loud, sing-songy nurses' voices are at the top of the list. I model quite and calm behavior. When a woman is entering active labor, I lower my voice, talking only when necessary, or when the mom talks to me, I move stealthily and quietly--- and dim the lights. I find the families and staff who follow me, mimic this. It creates a much more calming and soothing environment for the laboring mom and family. Perhaps you can model this to this person, or politely remind her how excess stimui really irritate and upset laboring women? Just a suggestion.
    Ah, a woman after my own heart. I too try to keep the environment calm and quiet. I truly hate the cheerleader types - and the ones who insist on counting to 10 with each push in a loud voice. Even when the laboring woman is pushing just fine.

    Then there are the nurses who grab up that baby and make a major big deal about drying the poor thing off - mom barely had a chance to see the baby.

    I could probably go on but I won't . . . .gotta go make dinner.

    rah rah sis boom bah . . . .

    steph
  11. by   Retired R.N.
    Quote from SmilingBluEyes
    I have found many laboring women are REALLY turned off by noxious stimuli, including perfume and noise. And loud, sing-songy nurses' voices are at the top of the list. I model quite and calm behavior. When a woman is entering active labor, I lower my voice, talking only when necessary, or when the mom talks to me, I move stealthily and quietly--- and dim the lights. I find the families and staff who follow me, mimic this. It creates a much more calming and soothing environment for the laboring mom and family. Perhaps you can model this to this person, or politely remind her how excess stimui really irritate and upset laboring women? Just a suggestion.
    How I wish I could have had a nurse like you when my children were born! At my first delivery I remember only too well having some nitwit continuously screeching "PUSH!" at me. Finally, I had had enough and told her that it was MY baby, My delivery, and I would push when I was d----d good and ready, so in the meantime, would she please get out of my room? I have always felt that it's a waste of effort to start pushing too soon, and one is better off to conserve her strength so as to be able to really push effectively later on. when it will do some good. When it's time to push, there is no way that one can NOT want to push with all the strength one has!

    Fortunately, I had a wonderful doctor who still believed that "babies come when they are ready," and did not believe in trying to speed up labor with artificial methods because he thought it was asking for trouble.
  12. by   nrsang97
    I am not a L&D nurse but give me a break. I think if I were in labor I would have had to kick her butt outta my room. She would have made me crazy.
  13. by   imenid37
    Some people think every event is all about "me", even though it is the patient's birth, your pt., etc. Sounds like this is one of those such people. You won't change her. Maybe patients or physicians who tell her to cut it out will have more impact. She views you as a peer, not as an authority figure. You are probably not the only one irritated by her. It is a form of "showing off" and this is one very immature gal. She may grow up or be aggravating for life. Ignore her or reinforce your position w/ each event. Be thankful you are on a limited assignment w/her. I know a person who tells pts. that "we are going to deliver your baby" all of the time. I usually say I am going to be here for the delivery. (it's mom's delivery and her family's. I am just there to help and support). Some pts. love this nurse, others are annoyed like
    h--- by her. She is clinically a very capable nurse, but loves to exagerrate her role in delivery and in many others aspects of life in general.
  14. by   SmilingBluEyes
    It also helps to ask the laboring mom what works for her. Some actually LIKE and ASK for counting and encouragement. Others want us to keep our mouths shut. It is not about us, you are right. It's their birth experience and it's our job to simply facilitate, not make things happen, as our egos would like to think.
    Last edit by SmilingBluEyes on Dec 2, '06

close