baby friendly questions baby friendly questions - pg.3 | allnurses

baby friendly questions - page 3

The hospital that I work at is in the process of becoming baby friendly, and I have some questions about how the baby friendly initiative is implemented in other hospitals. I want to start by... Read More

  1. Visit  klone profile page
    2
    It's inaccurate to say that La Leche League wants you to breastfeed until your child is 14. It's nothing but inflammatory hyperbole. As someone who was a LLL Leader for 10 years and wouldn't currently be an OB nurse and IBCLC if it weren't for LLL, I find such intentionally inflammatory and inaccurate statements to be hurtful.
    Mec_Happens and melmarie23 like this.
  2. Visit  nohika profile page
    3
    Quote from klone
    It's inaccurate to say that La Leche League wants you to breastfeed until your child is 14. It's nothing but inflammatory hyperbole. As someone who was a LLL Leader for 10 years and wouldn't currently be an OB nurse and IBCLC if it weren't for LLL, I find such intentionally inflammatory and inaccurate statements to be hurtful.
    It may not be your experience with LLL but she did say earlier that was her experience dealing with them. Not every LLL is the same.
    sharpeimom, Twinmom06, and Esme12 like this.
  3. Visit  Esme12 profile page
    1
    Quote from nohika
    It may not be your experience with LLL but she did say earlier that was her experience dealing with them. Not every LLL is the same.

    Thanks...... it's hard getting slammed and told your personal experience are inaccurate......Oh well.....I'm going to go and finish an article I was reading on lateral violence in nursing. Peace
    nursejohio likes this.
  4. Visit  melmarie23 profile page
    1
    I think the issue here is that we're using a few bad apples to make sweeping [negative] generalizations about organizations and initiatives such as LLL & BFHI. And that I think is what klone meant by inaccurate and unfair.
    ischialspines likes this.
  5. Visit  klone profile page
    1
    Quote from melmarie23
    I think the issue here is that we're using a few bad apples to make sweeping [negative] generalizations about organizations and initiatives such as LLL & BFHI. And that I think is what klone meant by inaccurate and unfair.
    That is exactly my point. It is not the belief or "policy" of LLL that you must breastfeed your child until 14. To state that represents LLL is unfair and inaccurate, just as stating that the scenario in the OP represents BFHI policy is wildly inaccurate.
    melmarie23 likes this.
  6. Visit  klone profile page
    1
    Quote from nohika
    It may not be your experience with LLL but she did say earlier that was her experience dealing with them. Not every LLL is the same.
    LLL is ONE organization that has certain guiding principles that are meant to apply to ALL groups. She may have had one whackadoo leader or member that took things to extremes (although I am still skeptical that anyone told her that she must breastfeed her child until 14 and I suspect she was indeed being hyperbolic, but whatever, I wasn't there) but that person is not accurately representing LLL and it IS inaccurate to say that this is LLL belief or philosophy.

    Again, just like what's described in the OP is not BFHI policy or philosophy.
    melmarie23 likes this.
  7. Visit  Esme12 profile page
    0
    I know thiis splitting hairs but I never said LLL in general, I specifically said
    We all have our personal journey's and one journey isn't more right than another journey. I was just my opinion, my experience, my thoughts and I'm sorry if the offended you.....
    Last edit by Esme12 on Aug 14, '11
  8. Visit  Rhee profile page
    2
    I'm glad to hear that this isn't the typical baby friendly experience. I think breastfeeding is wonderful and there are so many benefits to skin to skin vs. the warmer and rooming in. It seems as though my hospital has taken baby friendly to the extreme, and has interpreted it incorrectly.

    I just don't think it's my job to make my patients feel guilty. There's enough in life to feel guilty about without creating more, and there's more to having a child than how you feed him or her. We've just started with this waiver, and I kind of wonder what the fallout will be.
    Queen2u and Esme12 like this.
  9. Visit  mamabear85 profile page
    2
    Rhee, would you mind coming back and letting us know how things go? I'm curious if anyone will have a huge issue with signing such a waiver or if there are positive effects all around. Thank you for bringing this up, its obviously a polarizing topic.
    Esme12 and DizzyLizzyNurse like this.
  10. Visit  LibraSunCNM profile page
    4
    It just seems like this waiver policy will do what it has done in this thread---turn people off of the idea of Baby Friendly, when part of the point of BF is to make hospitals more marketable and attract patients. The administrator who came up with this idea will likely find it backfiring, and have patient complaints, IMHO.
  11. Visit  ischialspines profile page
    1
    Our hospital is aiming for baby-friendly as well, and on the whole (on the L&D side), it seems to be having great benefits... especially with the immediate skin-to-skin. I'm seeing mothers that perhaps might not otherwise jump into it really bonding with their babies and it's been great. Of course I don't know what happens really when we get them over to postpartum. We have had some difficulty coordinating roles between departments. I think the "baby-dropping" and squishing is r/t to narcotic pain relief and not so much maternal exhaustion (although moms can surely be exhausted!), and parents need to be supported gently in caring for their babies, and also that babies should NOT be in the bed with mamas when they are taking narcotics! It would be ideal if there was a family member or other support person in the room with mama and baby caring for the couplet.
    PNCC2001 likes this.
  12. Visit  ischialspines profile page
    1
    *NOT be in the bed with mamas when they are taking narcotics!
    should be amended to "not be in bed with SLEEPING mamas while they are taking narcotics!
    klone likes this.
  13. Visit  rn/writer profile page
    7
    Quote from ischialspines
    Our hospital is aiming for baby-friendly as well, and on the whole (on the L&D side), it seems to be having great benefits... especially with the immediate skin-to-skin. I'm seeing mothers that perhaps might not otherwise jump into it really bonding with their babies and it's been great. Of course I don't know what happens really when we get them over to postpartum. We have had some difficulty coordinating roles between departments. I think the "baby-dropping" and squishing is r/t to narcotic pain relief and not so much maternal exhaustion (although moms can surely be exhausted!), and parents need to be supported gently in caring for their babies, and also that babies should NOT be in the bed with mamas when they are taking narcotics! It would be ideal if there was a family member or other support person in the room with mama and baby caring for the couplet.
    While that is the ideal, it may not be feasible for families with other children who don't have close friends or relatives able to help them out. If there is no one to take those kids, dad goes home with them and mom is on her own with the new baby. And, too, there are far too many women (some just girls really) who either do not have a committed partner or whose partner won't be staying overnight with them.

    As for the baby-dropping and baby-squishing, a mom doesn't need narcs to arrive at a state where she no longer remembers her own name. Some of these moms labored for two+ days before delivering. And there are plenty of them who haven't slept comfortably for several weeks before the birth. Add to that the rush of visitors that insist they must see the baby right away before it goes home, and you can end up with a woman who feels drugged even if she isn't.

    I just can't see telling any mom she has to keep the baby in her room. That smacks of the same harshness and disrespect that occurred years ago when moms were told they had to leave the babies in the nursery. Neither extreme is right for everyone. And neither edict should be coming from the nurses on the unit.

    It makes me really sad to hear about hospitals deliberately eliminating nurseries so that moms will have to have their babies room in. That just doesn't take care of everyone effectively. And it's a dirty trick to play on women who didn't think to ask ahead of time if they'll be able to catch a couple of hours of uninterrupted sleep before they go home.

    It's a terrible thing to do to nurses, too. I've heard many of them say they'd be more than willing to give the mom a break except that they have no place to put the baby and no one to watch it.

    Do we really have to handle things this way? Or can we be halfway reasonable, provide the proper resources, and trust moms to do what is right for themselves and their babies?
    Last edit by rn/writer on Aug 17, '11

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