Any ADN-BSN programs without ridiculous papers? - page 25

by adnrnstudent

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Taking my 1st ADN-BSN class. Thinking of dropping it with only 1 week left. 1st class and already a 6 to 8 page paper. A concept analysis of 1 of the following 4 words: Caring, Hope, Trust, or Fear. This is absolutely... Read More


  1. 1
    Quote from adnrnstudent
    Taking my 1st ADN-BSN class. Thinking of dropping it with only 1 week left.

    1st class and already a 6 to 8 page paper. A concept analysis of 1 of the following 4 words: Caring, Hope, Trust, or Fear.

    This is absolutely ridiculous. I have absolutely no idea what to say.

    The structure of these programs MUST change.

    I don't want to write papers every 5 weeks. I want to read a book and take a test.
    Wonder if you ended up sticking it out, or dropping it.

    BSN's start talking more about theory. You can't teach that from a book and test. It is more of the art of nursing as opposed to the science.
    SE_BSN_RN likes this.
  2. 0
    I dropped. I don't write papers. Actually, had to take an F, was past the drop date.
  3. 1
    Quote from whealer
    Really, though? I know I'm beating a dead horse but the OP, and everyone else who agrees with OP, is making too big a deal out of a paper that is broad enough to address concepts (not just words) in a way that makes sense to you and is essential to patient care.
    I just simply am unable to write papers. I don't do it. I tried, I really did, I even took a week off work to try to do it, but unable to write anything outside of bullet point format.

    I made it through things in the past by doing well on tests and just taking the F on papers.
    PMFB-RN likes this.
  4. 1
    Quote from adnrnstudent
    I just simply am unable to write papers. I don't do it. I tried, I really did, I even took a week off work to try to do it, but unable to write anything outside of bullet point format.

    I made it through things in the past by doing well on tests and just taking the F on papers.
    PM me I can help you work it out. Nothing is stopping you from writing a paper and getting a passing grade... except you.
    besaangel likes this.
  5. 0
    Quote from adnrnstudent
    I just simply am unable to write papers. I don't do it. I tried, I really did, I even took a week off work to try to do it, but unable to write anything outside of bullet point format.

    I made it through things in the past by doing well on tests and just taking the F on papers.
    *** This is me exactly! I can understand a subject and can pass tests no problem. Like you I can't write a paper to save my life. I really need to do it though and soon as I am enrolled in a MSN program that starts this winter. Very worried.
  6. 2
    Quote from whealer
    Okay, I'm in my pre-nursing stage so I'm not going to make any assumptions about the level of difficulty in either the ADN programs (which I'm currently enrolled in) or BSN/MSN (which I do hope to obtain).

    Really, though? I know I'm beating a dead horse but the OP, and everyone else who agrees with OP, is making too big a deal out of a paper that is broad enough to address concepts (not just words) in a way that makes sense to you and is essential to patient care. If it's really that bad, just discuss with the professor. I bugged my Professor whenever I could to explain certain projects. I did research and would walk a fine line between putting my best effort and not overthinking the content.

    I obtained a Bachelors in Forensic Psychology and had to write hundreds of pages of papers not only for my core psych courses, but for other liberal arts courses - history, english, etc. I also tutored other students with their writing papers so feel free to send me a private message if you need assistance. We all hate certain aspects of education and will find a million reasons (or excuses) to make it seem like it's all BS. But what it comes down to is your perception and your approach. No one is forcing you to enroll in a program that is at its foundation about theory and research, which is just another facet of the technical and clinical approaches to nursing. It's the same with Psych, and I'm sure it's the same for any other role in which you're interacting with people and improving their health and well-being. No college program will ever teach you to be a better nurse; they give you the tools that you need to develop your own personal talents and skills. Take what you need and put the rest in your back pocket.

    When I went to school, because I took the time to put a little bit more effort into my papers and researching what I learned, there were several occasions when I had to point out errors that professors (mostly adjunct) had made when they taught psych theory. Knowledge is power, my friends. It can't hurt to be open to it.
    THIS!!! 1 TRILLION times!!

    You'd be surprised how those papers and research will help shape your practice down the journey in this business.

    Sorry to hear that you got an F in the course...I hope you seek out tutoring or assistance in getting through this writing class. Do let the daunting task of writing stop YOU...there's always help!
    SE_BSN_RN and besaangel like this.
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    Quote from LadyFree28

    THIS!!! 1 TRILLION times!!

    You'd be surprised how those papers and research will help shape your practice down the journey in this business.

    Sorry to hear that you got an F in the course...I hope you seek out tutoring or assistance in getting through this writing class. Do*let the daunting task of writing stop YOU...there's always help!
    *I meant don't
  8. 0
    Hmmm.....well, I could have dropped out of my LPN-BSN program because I didn't like going to clinicals, being told "watch what the RN does...ask questions....you are here to learn..." and then having those RN's and CNA's expect me to get vital signs, and do ADL's while they sat on their butts the whole shift!

    I would gladly write a paper than go through that again!!

    I don't know about anyone else, but my BSN program wasn't "fluff" and I actually took a lot away from it.....darn that PhD RN making me critically think about that fishbone diagram!!! And darn her for asking me "why?....why?...why?...why??....but WHY????"

    Please don't be my nurse!
  9. 7
    Quote from SE_BSN_RN
    Hmmm.....well, I could have dropped out of my LPN-BSN program because I didn't like going to clinicals, being told "watch what the RN does...ask questions....you are here to learn..." and then having those RN's and CNA's expect me to get vital signs, and do ADL's while they sat on their butts the whole shift!

    I would gladly write a paper than go through that again!!

    I don't know about anyone else, but my BSN program wasn't "fluff" and I actually took a lot away from it.....darn that PhD RN making me critically think about that fishbone diagram!!! And darn her for asking me "why?....why?...why?...why??....but WHY????"

    Please don't be my nurse!
    I think there are different programs....as a working ASN many years ago....I had a perfectly successful career. My employer a few years back wanted their managers/directors to have a BSN. So......I took an online RN-BSN becasue they paid for it....it really didn't "add" anything to my practice. Not one thing. I was a successful director of emergency Services and critical care. I was in charge of 2 ICU's, telemetry/PCU and the ED over a hundred employees. For me it added nothing but the knowledge of how to do a paper using and APA style.

    I do however believe that nursing needs to decide on one level of RN entry if only to stop this incessant bickering about who is superior. We as nurses have much more important agenda on our plates like staffing ratios and patient safety than to promote a nursing shortage that no longer exists.

    The proliferation of the drive through schools and pumping out graduates every six months to a workforce that doesn't need them is irresponsible.
    Dazglue, nursel56, morte, and 4 others like this.
  10. 4
    Quote from SE_BSN_RN
    Hmmm.....well, I could have dropped out of my LPN-BSN program because I didn't like going to clinicals, being told "watch what the RN does...ask questions....you are here to learn..." and then having those RN's and CNA's expect me to get vital signs, and do ADL's while they sat on their butts the whole shift!

    I would gladly write a paper than go through that again!!

    I don't know about anyone else, but my BSN program wasn't "fluff" and I actually took a lot away from it.....darn that PhD RN making me critically think about that fishbone diagram!!! And darn her for asking me "why?....why?...why?...why??....but WHY????"

    Please don't be my nurse!
    *** An LPN to BSN program is a very, very different animal than and RN to BSN program. An LPN becoming and RN SHOULD learn a lot, after all they are preparing you to enter professional nursing practice. That is not true for the RN to BSN.


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