Any ADN-BSN programs without ridiculous papers? - page 21

Taking my 1st ADN-BSN class. Thinking of dropping it with only 1 week left. 1st class and already a 6 to 8 page paper. A concept analysis of 1 of the following 4 words: Caring, Hope, Trust, or... Read More

  1. Visit  ixchel profile page
    0
    Quote from elkpark
    Ixchel is, I believe, referring to the course content. What do you mean by your "professors didn't present any information"? There were no reading assignments? No classroom presentations or discussion? No course objectives of what you were supposed to learn over the semester?
    I'm a bit confused as well. How would professors in a BSN research class NOT present information? What would the exams be on???

    Eta: I still have every note I took in my research class. If I get the chance, I'll post the topic of every lecture.
  2. Get the hottest topics every week!

    Subscribe to our free Nursing Insights newsletter.

  3. Visit  CrossCountryRN2008 profile page
    0
    They are papers mainly. It is evidence based research. That is the biggest difference between ADN and BSN
  4. Visit  PMFB-RN profile page
    0
    Quote from elkpark
    Ixchel is, I believe, referring to the course content. What do you mean by your "professors didn't present any information"? There were no reading assignments? No classroom presentations or discussion? No course objectives of what you were supposed to learn over the semester?
    *** Oh there was certainly information about the course itself. What I meant was there it wasn't like a lecture where a professor with advanced knowledge of the subject stood in front of the class and taught us. It was all self learning. We were supposed to teach ourselves.
  5. Visit  PMFB-RN profile page
    0
    Quote from CrossCountryRN2008
    They are papers mainly. It is evidence based research. That is the biggest difference between ADN and BSN
    *** I doubt it. I think if you compare the curriculum of today's ADN and BSN program you would be hard pressed to find any difference. The ADN programs started moving towards the BSN curriculum for years now.
  6. Visit  subee profile page
    2
    Quote from PMFB-RN
    Ya I feel you. I got dumber doing my BSN program at a local state U. The papers were stupid, the level of discourse was pathetic, the learning non-exsistant. You will get many apologists here for the BSN. Most of them have never studied any other field and have no idea how abserd the BSN is. Many will accuse you of being anti education if you recognize the weakness inherent on BSN programs. As far as I am concered the the BSN, as they are now, are a waste of tim

    No way I would have done it except it was free and I got to write most of my papers on paid time.
    Many nurses are content to practice nursing as a trade. Others want take it on as a profession. Fortunately there is room for both. It is ashame that the BSN has become so cheapened; that's the issue; not that you had to get it.
    redhead_NURSE98! and elkpark like this.
  7. Visit  Esme12 profile page
    2
    Quote from CrossCountryRN2008
    They are papers mainly. It is evidence based research. That is the biggest difference between ADN and BSN
    Papers in a ADN program are evidenced based as well.....remember we all sit for the same boards.
    redhead_NURSE98! and Lennonninja like this.
  8. Visit  PMFB-RN profile page
    1
    Many nurses are content to practice nursing as a trade. Others want take it on as a profession. Fortunately there is room for both.
    I don't think there is. I think the profession side will not rest until they have driven every last "trade" minded nurse out of the field. We see examples of this often.

    I
    t is ashame that the BSN has become so cheapened; that's the issue; not that you had to get it.
    Your statement above implies that at some time in the past the BSN was something it isn't now. I would like to know when that was.
    redhead_NURSE98! likes this.
  9. Visit  TiffyRN profile page
    0
    Quote from Esme12
    Papers in a ADN program are evidenced based as well.....remember we all sit for the same boards.
    Esme, not contradicting you at all here. I would just like to point out that some of us went to school when papers were not required. The only paper I wrote in ADN school was a micro paper (on botulism) and a drug paper (on atropine I think?). Both were very short and maybe had 2 sources, none from true scholastic journals. Unlike students of today, it took me going back to school and taking a couple of courses teaching research methods to learn how to read current research and evaluate it. Could I have done this on my own? Heck yea! But I wasn't going to!
  10. Visit  elkpark profile page
    0
    Quote from PMFB-RN
    *** Oh there was certainly information about the course itself. What I meant was there it wasn't like a lecture where a professor with advanced knowledge of the subject stood in front of the class and taught us. It was all self learning. We were supposed to teach ourselves.
    Oh. Well, again, there is a lot of variation among programs. In my state university B&M BSN completion program, professors with advanced knowledge of (and experience in) the subject(s) did stand in front of the class and teach us. It wasn't a big thrill or anything, but it was a valid, worthwhile educational experience.
  11. Visit  PMFB-RN profile page
    0
    Quote from elkpark
    Oh. Well, again, there is a lot of variation among programs. In my state university B&M BSN completion program, professors with advanced knowledge of (and experience in) the subject(s) did stand in front of the class and teach us. It wasn't a big thrill or anything, but it was a valid, worthwhile educational experience.
    *** I am just saying the very expensive class took 8 weeks to cover what was already learned in a two day education offered by a group of area hospitals who used for more effective teaching methods.
    As big a joke as my class at a state university was, you should see was some of my co-workers who attended for profit online programs like U of P.
    There shouldn't be much variation among accredited BSN programs. However you are correct, there is a lot of variation and BSN after a nurses name doesn't really tell you much about her education.
  12. Visit  ixchel profile page
    3
    PMFB, you have stated countless times how terrible your program was in general, and those of us who have been in excellent BSN programs have challenged that idea with our own experiences and you have had some form of, "yeah, but....." to shoot us down every time. Clearly we have had vastly differing experiences that left us with completely different ideas on the subject.

    My class was presented in lecture format, with 4 exams in total with one project where we selected a research article and we dissected it in a presentation in front of the class. My class wasn't a "this is how you research stuff" class with a tour of a card catalog. It was a "here is how to critically appraise a research study so you know whether it is any good or not" class. Some parts of the class were stupidly easy. Other parts were very challenging. Overall, when it comes to nursing class in general, yes, I was glad for what felt like an easier A. But I still learned a lot and I was still challenged.

    The approach they had in presenting the context was as follows:
    Intro to nursing research
    Overview of the research process
    Understanding evidence-based practice
    Ethical issues in nursing research
    Selecting and defining the problem
    Formulating hypotheses and research questions
    Selecting a sample and a setting
    Applying appropriate theories and conceptual models
    Analyzing quantitative data (this was the hardest of all - statistics. Not computing them, but understanding them in detail.)
    Interpreting and reporting research findings
    And finally, critiquing research reports, which brought it all together for the sake of deciding whether the research was valid, necessary, and worth it.

    Each of those topics defined each component contained within, and highlighted what would be present in a good study, and what would make it a bad study. Since this class, I have moved on to do my own research (review of literature) for an independent study, and what I've taken from my research class is the ability to look at studies and say, "this is junk", and thank goodness for that. I had one study in particular that I was really excited to use because it perfectly described my population and topic of interest. As I made my way through the study, I discovered about midway through that the majority of the subjects had a comorbid condition that should have excluded them completely. Very frustrating because it had the potential to be one of the strongest pieces of my project, but I couldn't use it. I really don't think I would have considered that had I done my reading before I took my research class.

    Just some food for thought. Clearly your class just sucked, but that doesn't mean that they all do. Mine was pretty fantastic, even on the days when I felt overwhelmed by my course load in general. And all of the writing I have done has refined me. Will it improve the nurse I will be? Well, I won't know until I get there. I think it does largely depend on your goals in nursing. I have no desire to be med/surg, and can see to a degree how the volume of writing seems silly if that is your goal after graduation.

    However, how about areas of medicine and nursing practice that are rapidly changing, such as neuro? Doesn't it help to understand the studies directly, rather than someone else's interpretation of them? I can't tell you how many times I've heard fantastic information on the news, then followed the trail to the original research article and it turns out the research itself was somehow severely flawed.
    llg, elkpark, and poppycat like this.
  13. Visit  ixchel profile page
    0
    Well now that was a lengthy ramble. ☺️
  14. Visit  emtb2rn profile page
    2
    I think we have an apples vs. oranges conversation going on about different types of programs.

    There's the brick & mortar adn-bsn which has facetime with the professor, lectures, reading, papers & tests. Then there's the online version which has reading, online discussions & papers.

    I'm in the latter type and yeah, it is pretty lame and basically a rubber stamp. Sad, but I need the "BSN" in order to do anything beyond the bedside. That said, I am one of those 2nd career RNs who came to nursing with degrees in other fields and considerable experience. So for me it's ok.
    nursel56 and redhead_NURSE98! like this.


Nursing Jobs in every specialty and state. Visit today and find your dream job.

Top