"Old", New Grad still trying to break into the Hospital scene...

  1. 0
    Hello friends,

    I graduated an ADN program in May 2010 and went straight into an RN-BSN program to make myself more marketable. Now I have 14 months experience in a SNF and will be graduating the my BSN in May. I am afraid I won't be marketable now because many new grad programs are asking for 1) No prior work as an RN and 2) less than 6 months-1 year of RN licensure.

    I'm applying to do the CSU Chico Rural Preceptorship for Summer 2012 to keep my skills fresh, but I'm so discouraged.

    Does anybody else have similar sentiments or experience? Any tips? Stories? Advice?

    Thanks a bunch,

    B
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  3. 9 Comments so far...

  4. 0
    I have nothing specific to add except keep looking and applying.

    I know how depressing it can be, but DO NOT GIVE UP!
  5. 0
    I'm in my third semester of nursing school and I also applied to the Chico Program
  6. 2
    I have two friends who did exactly what you did. They graduated with their ADN, went to work in SNFs, and went directly into their BSN programs. As each graduated their BSN programs, they applied to acute care positions and both were hired. They worked a little over a year at their SNF positions in the meantime.

    So if you have worked as a RN at a SNF for the amount of time it took to get your BSN, you really aren't considered a new grad anymore right?

    Correct me if I am wrong but there is experience to be had and learned in the SNF environment for RN skills. Time management, leadership, IV therapy, foley insertions, wound management, med administration, charting, assessment skills... and many many more I am sure.

    Do NOT sell yourself short.
    not.done.yet and Rahrahking like this.
  7. 0
    Unfortunately, you are not a new grad anymore. However, you will have more than a year and a half of nursing experience under your belt, which while it's not technically acute care experience is still valuable. SNFs are not easy places to work, and I have the utmost respect for those nurses who can hack it because I don't think I could.

    I agree: you have learned a lot more than you realize, and you have a lot more to offer employers than you think. So find ways to emphasize the skills that you learned in SNF and how you think they would apply to acute care.
  8. 0
    I know how you feel I'm an old newgrad as well. My strategy now is to focus on one thing only. I decided to specialize in the ER. So I volunteer for my county hospital here in Nor Cal. I just keep plugin into everything ER. This one place I volunteer is one of the busiest trauma center in our region. I cannot tell you how much I'm learning there. I hope one day someone will notice my hard work and give me a job. I think that what they want is someone who is dedicated to one department, that is one way they know you will stay. I also think that (as in any other profession) they want you to pay your dues. I think is a different story for everyone. I feel strong that way but it might not work for some other people, eventually, if you persist you'll find yourself in.
  9. 0
    Look for an internship or externship at your local hospitals NOW!!!! Although you will be graduating, this may give you an edge as this is usually 3mos of paid training (not at an RN rate). Normally, this is something you could've done during your summer breaks; it gives you the edge of networking, real work but being precepted during that time.

    All students should be doing this if their job market is poor....you need something to distinguish you from others when starting a new profession. Good luck to you.
  10. 0
    It looks like you might be in northern California. Ukiah Valley Medical Center has a residency program that takes those with "minimal" experience not in acute care. You might be eligible.
  11. 0
    Quote from NorCalRN85
    Hello friends,

    I graduated an ADN program in May 2010 and went straight into an RN-BSN program to make myself more marketable. Now I have 14 months experience in a SNF and will be graduating the my BSN in May. I am afraid I won't be marketable now because many new grad programs are asking for 1) No prior work as an RN and 2) less than 6 months-1 year of RN licensure.

    B
    You sound marketable to me.

    While you are an experienced RN, some will view you as a new grad, potentially the best of both worlds.

    You may or may not qualify for a new grad program. It all depends on their criteria. A few years ago I hired an RN for an acute care unit who had one year of home care experience. She was also still able to get into the preceptor program because she had no hospital experience.

    New grad programs are great, but not critical to your success.

    Good Luck
  12. 0
    Quote from marcos9999
    I know how you feel I'm an old newgrad as well. My strategy now is to focus on one thing only. I decided to specialize in the ER. So I volunteer for my county hospital here in Nor Cal. I just keep plugin into everything ER. This one place I volunteer is one of the busiest trauma center in our region. I cannot tell you how much I'm learning there. I hope one day someone will notice my hard work and give me a job. I think that what they want is someone who is dedicated to one department, that is one way they know you will stay. I also think that (as in any other profession) they want you to pay your dues. I think is a different story for everyone. I feel strong that way but it might not work for some other people, eventually, if you persist you'll find yourself in.
    . I hope you get the job!!!


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