Getting a job - from the employers perspective - page 5

by Nascar nurse

12,626 Views | 61 Comments

I am the DON in a LTC facility. I currently have ads on careerbuilder for a full time CNA position as well as a full time LPN/RN position. Both positions are clearly advertised as 3-11 positions. I spent my day going thru what... Read More


  1. 0
    Quote from VivaLasViejas
    I got my current job through CareerBuilder, and use it whenever we have staff vacancies. Even when we weed through applications, we still occasionally interview a real winner.......like the woman who came in last week. A refugee from the local multiplex, she believed her experience at managing a theater and cleaning up after people somehow qualified her to take care of frail elderly folks. But wait, it gets better: she brought in not only her resume, but 14 years' worth of employee evaluations that were fair-to-middling at best, and terrible at worst. And the coup de grace---she even brought in copies of her write-ups!! I still think she just interviewed with us to fulfill the job-search requirement for unemployment benefits......surely no one who really wants a job would bring less-than-stellar evidence to showcase her, um, talents.
    Thank you for this post. I had a good (much needed) laugh. Also reminds me of the individual who handed me their resume years ago...printed on 8 cue cards.
  2. 0
    Quote from Patti_RN
    I received a resume that had ALL identifying information blacked out! Name, phone number, address, the names of schools attended, as well as the names of previous employers. The cover letter indicated that privacy concerns and fears of identity theft prevented her from sharing this information with a 'total stranger'. She signed her letter with her first name and included an email address that she apparantly created to hide her name and also communicate her professionalism, FoxyRedHeadPartier@____ .com
    You've got to be kidding me?!!!! ROTF LMBO!!!
  3. 0
    Quote from TracyE78
    I applied for and got an interview with an office (they called me to come in to interview after reading my resume) but I got to looking at the job posting again and wonder if they're setting me up to fail. The posting clearly states must have 6 months related experience (I don't have any in that field) and ACLS (I only have BLS). Are they really taking a chance on me or will they overlook that if I rock my interview? I interviewed with that company before and didn't get the job, but two days after I emailed the "thank you for meeting with me" note I got the call for this interview (which was 4 weeks after the initial interview). Hope I get it!
    Depending on your background they may view you as worthwhile to train. ACLS is a 2 day class which the hospitals offer routinely, so that part can be overlooked sometimes. Good luck!
  4. 0
    If I was the DON i wouldn't put a resume to the back burner because the person lives far away. Sometimes jobs close to home say they are hiring and they are not. It is very discouraging for some CNA to find job, especially me. I applied to a lot of facilities that are far but I am willing to travel because this is what I want to do and I'm sure some Cna feel the same. Are you in NYC ?
  5. 0
    But I understand the unprofessionalism. That's not good when it comes to applying for any job
  6. 1
    Quote from LJohnson11213
    If I was the DON i wouldn't put a resume to the back burner because the person lives far away. Sometimes jobs close to home say they are hiring and they are not. It is very discouraging for some CNA to find job, especially me. I applied to a lot of facilities that are far but I am willing to travel because this is what I want to do and I'm sure some Cna feel the same. Are you in NYC ?
    Not calling you out in particular - just making a point and using your post to demonstrate so no offense intended personally. Ok!

    If you were a DON you would understand that this hiring blitz I'm currently in the midst of is an additional task in amongst all the other crap pouring onto my desk by the minute. While I'm sorting thru 50-100 resumes I'm NOT doing the rest of my duties. While I'm spending time on the phone trying to call people to setup appointments, I'm NOT doing the rest of my duties. While I'm spending time interviewing, I'm NOT doing the rest of my duties.

    My point to anyone looking for a position that is posted a distance away from your current location...add it to the cover letter that you realize you are a distance away but a) intend to move to the area b) acknowledge you are aware of the distance and feel the commute is workable for you. Because of this thread & all your comments I did take the time to call 3 candidates that I had previously put in my due not call pile. I kid you not, ALL 3 HAD NO CLUE where the facility was even located and one voiced her shock that I was 2 states away. I did go back and look at my ad and it clearly states the street, city and state address. This turned out to be a complete waste of time but it is educational for all of you - acknowledge that distance in a cover letter so you are not automatically disqualified. I'm sure I'm not the only hiring manager who would otherwise see it as a waste of their time.

    Had 5 interviews scheduled today. 1 great candidate, 1 so-so candidate, 1 called early to politely reschedule, 2 no-call no-shows!
    Meriwhen likes this.
  7. 0
    Quote from Altra
    Listing clinicals as employment ... ?

    OK, now I've had my "now I've heard it all" moment for the day.
    At our school, we are encouraged to make a "nursing" resume and put our clinical hours on it -- under nursing experience. Many nursing students apply for aide jobs after the first year of school - why should they not list that they have some floor experience?

    I have worked since I was 16 (21 now). I have a decent resume, but I still put that I'm currently completing clinical hours in oncology/med/surg/wherever.
    Many of the students in my class have not worked besides the odd babysitting job. What other experience do they put down?
  8. 0
    Quote from sadavey
    At our school, we are encouraged to make a "nursing" resume and put our clinical hours on it -- under nursing experience. Many nursing students apply for aide jobs after the first year of school - why should they not list that they have some floor experience?

    I have worked since I was 16 (21 now). I have a decent resume, but I still put that I'm currently completing clinical hours in oncology/med/surg/wherever.
    Many of the students in my class have not worked besides the odd babysitting job. What other experience do they put down?
    List your clinical experiences under education. List any odd jobs you may have had (actually I get the best references from some of these people - those employers tend to absolutely "gush" over how wonderful so & so is!). If you haven't had any jobs at all, that's OK too (give me a reason to like you and make me believe you will show up & do your best to fit in with my team and I just may hire you over someone with 20 years experience and a huge chip on their shoulder. )
  9. 0
    Quote from Nascar nurse
    Not calling you out in particular - just making a point and using your post to demonstrate so no offense intended personally. Ok!If you were a DON you would understand that this hiring blitz I'm currently in the midst of is an additional task in amongst all the other crap pouring onto my desk by the minute. While I'm sorting thru 50-100 resumes I'm NOT doing the rest of my duties. While I'm spending time on the phone trying to call people to setup appointments, I'm NOT doing the rest of my duties. While I'm spending time interviewing, I'm NOT doing the rest of my duties. My point to anyone looking for a position that is posted a distance away from your current location...add it to the cover letter that you realize you are a distance away but a) intend to move to the area b) acknowledge you are aware of the distance and feel the commute is workable for you. Because of this thread & all your comments I did take the time to call 3 candidates that I had previously put in my due not call pile. I kid you not, ALL 3 HAD NO CLUE where the facility was even located and one voiced her shock that I was 2 states away. I did go back and look at my ad and it clearly states the street, city and state address. This turned out to be a complete waste of time but it is educational for all of you - acknowledge that distance in a cover letter so you are not automatically disqualified. I'm sure I'm not the only hiring manager who would otherwise see it as a waste of their time. Had 5 interviews scheduled today. 1 great candidate, 1 so-so candidate, 1 called early to politely reschedule, 2 no-call no-shows!
    That's just insane. I'm sorry you had that experience. I have never placed that type of information on a cover letter, honestly. It has actually never come up. I've gotten every position I've ever applied for except two. Perhaps they were because of distance, but I think not, considering many people in my town worked there. I think it had more to do with my lack of experience at the time. Really though, the job I truly wanted I was hired for, with no mention of my commute by me or them. I am coming up in a year there and am still in love, in spite of how exhausting it can be at times lol.Hopefully you get some good candidates that are committed regardless of distance.
  10. 1
    What about the older experienced nurse with only an diploma and 30 years of acute care experience that hasn't been able to get a full time steady position in 4 years and have some how managed to scrimp by on one temp position after another( the key word here is temporary) because first and for the sake of argument: The excuses I have heard is: we have the poor economy and every on is laying off, "BSN required" or "BSN prefurrrrred( as in cat fur)"or "recent" acute care experience- recent being defined as what ever the(b) witch behind the desk says it is. I wonder after listing all these temporary positions on a resume, what does that look like????????????? But I don't think too many hiring managers give a rats behind- they just assume."this many jobs in 4 years!!!" not I don't give them any credit for any brains.

    What I think the real problem is: my age. I don't have the Farrah fawcet teeth from the American Dental Association, I'm not a size 000 and my name isn't something out of the current baby book name trends ending with an "ie" or a cutesy 'y' o ra 'tabatha' and the IQ to match, or am mommy's little pet princess. Oh and I'm not good at dumbing things down nor do I have the 'duh' mentality.

    If this sounds bitter and angry, Welll!!!!!!!!!!!!!!DUH!!!!!!!!!!!!

    I was finally able to begin finishing my BSN, only because I am unemployed and qualified for state aid. It is 1/2 way through the semester and I have a 4.0 average. and as crazy as it sounds- I am getting my BSN only to get the HE** out of nursing. A Bachelors degree is a bachelors degree. I am going to do something so totally unrelated to the world of nusing, a world i hope to shut the door on and leave long behind. Why the BSN- because I had 89 credits toward it over 25 years ago. I hope to never have to use that sacred BSN. Not after the financial and emotional ruin nursing has oput me in because of dumb managers who the dumber a person is, the higher they advance. There's another reason I don't have a full time job- I seem to threaten their poor fragile egos, I am told to "Do me a favor, don't tell people what you know" This was said to me verbatium at the last temp position by my last nursing supervisor with only 1/3 the experience as I. The idiot got mad at me and who told me to send a male 38 yr patient out the door with out being seen for " the skin peeling" off his hands" she called it a "rash", "He doesn't need to be see!", "He is wasting the doctors time!". And me being the stubbron old nurse I am, interviewed this guy because of the way he looked/pale/ashen before I let him out the door and found, The patient was a cancer patient having a chemotherapy reaction to Sutent( I was an oncology nurse for 18 years)- his BP was 220/100 and he had a kidney removed for renal cell ca, 3 weeks prior. Madam BSN, RN for the ED, wanted him out the door. Do I sound fed up???? I am the one who can't get a full time job??? but survive on temporary positions. I have many more stories to expose. Nursing can "let's dumb it down". Another favorite of mine is the trendy 20 somethings with the ie on the end of their names at a nursing agency- keeps sending me a tele stepdown nurse to LTC shifts. after I stopped doing shifts for the agency because I found a temp position on my own, I look at "my profile" on their website- there is no mention of any acute care experience at all. No wonder I couldn't get a contract position in any hospital- that is career murdering, not to mention the financial devastation it has done.

    A BSN with 5 years experience who let the unit secretary triage a 11 month baby who fell off the bed and was screaming with abdominal pain when he had to poop, triaged the kid into the doctor's office and when I asked her what she was doing her response was "it's ok, I got him an appointment for today" no xray capability in the office at all. The kid should have been taken to the ED. That incident, the ward secretary and the BSN that let her do it, I reported to the state depart of Health for unsafe and unlicensed practice of nursing. The office was issued a deficiency with every 6 month checks for their following of corrective action. I could go on and on.
    Last edit by Esme12 on Oct 15, '12
    PMFB-RN likes this.


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