Sandy Storm whom do I serve? - page 4

Sandy storm is en-route I feel it's strength echo in the wind that cautions me vigilance. My husband ,who is a Srgt.in the NYPD , has already been called in and is expected to be on duty for a... Read More

  1. by   ktwlpn
    exactly-and it's stunning the number of phone calls we get into the nursing home during an emergency.Maybe two family members out of 250 will call to ask if everything is ok,is there anything there loved ones need,is there anything they can do? or give a "Thanks for all you do" It's as if we care about their loved ones more then they do.....O,right-in many cases that's true....
  2. by   JZ_RN
    I've said it before and I'll say it again. If it comes down to me or patients or my family members or patients, sorry but I'm going to take care of my own and myself every time. I've worked 20 hour shifts. Doubles. Through tornadoes and storms, blizzards and everything. i will go in if it's safe. But I will not abandon my family to be worked to death or maybe harmed. The patients are not my number one priority over myself and my family. My job comes number 2 in my life after myself and my family. I am dedicated to my job, work countless hours of unpaid overtime and work harder than anyone should ever have to. It's not a matter of prep or planning, it's a matter of where do I need to be in an emergency? And if the emergency could result in harm to my family or myself... sorry. I'm not shirking responsibility either and anyone who thinks so can get over it. Would your patients risk life and limb or their families for YOU? You bet your behind they would not.

    I'm not gonna get hurt trying to get to work or abandon my family to get to the patients.
  3. by   Been there,done that
    In a disaster situation, there should be policies in place.
    Policies.. or not ... I and my family must come first. It is called survival.
    In a disaster , the facility should have a plan , if it does not include my personal safety... all bets are off.
    Stay safe, my prayers to all involved.
  4. by   monkeybug
    Quote from CapeCodMermaid
    I am the DON of my facility. I live on the coast of Massachusetts. I made it into work. Several of the younger nurses were surprised to see me (I've only been there a few months and they don't know me well) and asked if I was considered an 'essential' worker. Heck yes I'm essential!
    All the managers were there and we all stayed until the next shift arrived. The MDS nurses pitched a fit when the administrator said non essential people could go home. I said anyone with a license was expected to stay until we knew there was enough staff to cover the shift.
    And for those of you who speak about their bosses having pizza parties?? Yikes. My managers and I make sure the staff nurses take a break and a lunch/dinner every day. Please don't lump us all in the same (sinking) boat.
    The last big weather incident we had? Our manager not only didn't show up, but she never called to check on the unit.
  5. by   DoGoodThenGo
    Quote from NRSKarenRN
    For over 100 years, nurses have made storm preparation arrangements with their families so they could perform their essential function and be at work during blizzard/hurricane/tornados/coal strike/ floods. Why is today's generation shirking this aspect of our job?
    NRSKarenRN you are a dear woman and I am devoted to you, but do not feel that is entirely fair.

    For much of the past 100 years nurses were mainly if not exclusively single women without children. Married women were either not hired or got shot of when they became in a family way, and an unmarried woman with children was beyond the pale. Therefore the only "family" one presumes such nurses had to worry about would be parents and or perhaps younger siblings if orphaned.

    The cult of self sacrificing angels of mercy really only began to attach itself to nurses starting with WWI and WWII, along with major outbreaks of disease such as the Spanish Flu epidemic of 1918. Even then we were still mainly talking about young unmarried women.

    It is worth remembering that despite this advertising/media blitz the United States military was very short of nurses during WWII as many simply weren't interested in signing up to be sent wherever and under god only knows what conditions. Things were so bad there was going to be a draft of nurses, however the surrender of Germany lessened staffing requirements so it never happened.

    Facilities and quite honestly some in the profession cannot have it both ways. They've gotten rid of whites caps and the whole "romantic" ideals of nursing replaced by quite frankly that a professional nurse is an employee to be managed and lead as such deemed fit by the facility. When you go down that road it isn't surprising that women with children and or families think twice and or act to preserve their own interests first.

    As one poster put it in an other thread; a hospital can always hire another nurse, one's children however cannot replace their mother or father.

    Then there is the sad lessons learned from hurricane Katrina which is still shaking down through healthcare and disaster response professionals today. http://www.nytimes.com/2009/08/30/ma...anted=all&_r=1
    Last edit by DoGoodThenGo on Oct 30, '12 : Reason: Added Content
  6. by   Indy
    I don't see much in the way of natural disasters where I live. There are snow/ice storms once in a while. Nobody here knows how to drive in the rain, let alone in snow. My previous employer had two years between snowstorms. One was 2009 and I was stuck there for 3 days. There was a bed provided, we raided the pantry a wee bit, and the dude with the truck who brought a bunch of our relief to work stopped by mcdonalds and got a huge bag of sausage biscuits for us the first morning.

    Then the paycheck came, and we were paid double-time during the storm. Ok. Very nice. I had packed a bag and with the aid of benadryl and hard work, slept very well and finally went home when the ice was a little bit melted.

    Two years later and I had a week off, quite by accident, when a nice snow/ice storm hit. No I did not go in. The rooms were full, they made no accommodation for the nurses other than maybe they could sleep in the chapel. Well sleep didn't happen very well in the daytime, the secretary wouldn't stay off the overhead pager. There was no raiding the food. There were no biscuits, no overtime or double-time or incentive. There were people who stayed at a hotel nearby, and the company didn't pay for it. I don't remember if there was anyone to pick people up and help them get to work. Such a difference in two years! No I don't work there anymore.
  7. by   anotherone
    sometimes, especially in these ities were this never happens the orders to evacuate come quickly . ugh i dont have children so i understood my life and saftey is worth less to many, @@ but i still value it above anything else. nyu hospital's generator failed!! 10-12 feet of water in elevater shafts and some areas. i can only imagine the chaos on moving patients down 9 flights in the dark, with flashlights only,, while bagging them, critical drips, equipment/beds weighing 100s pounds. i anticipate reading accounta of employees there that night.
  8. by   Aurora77
    Quote from DoGoodThenGo

    Facilities and quite honestly some in the profession cannot have it both ways. They've gotten rid of whites caps and the whole "romantic" ideals of nursing replaced by quite frankly that a professional nurse is an employee to be managed and lead as such deemed fit by the facility. When you go down that road it isn't surprising that women with children and or families think twice and or act to preserve their own interests first.

    As one poster put it in an other thread; a hospital can always hire another nurse, one's children however cannot replace their mother or father.]
    Exactly. If healthcare is a business, then all professions associated with it are just jobs. Considering the way many posters report being treated by their employers, is it any wonder employees aren't willing to go above and beyond? My belief is that family comes first, always. Not to say I wouldn't try to make it in during a disaster (which around here is tornadoes and ice storms), but I won't sacrifice my life or my family's safety to do so. If that makes me a bad nurse, so be it.
  9. by   DoGoodThenGo
    Quote from anotherone
    sometimes, especially in these ities were this never happens the orders to evacuate come quickly . ugh i dont have children so i understood my life and saftey is worth less to many, @@ but i still value it above anything else. nyu hospital's generator failed!! 10-12 feet of water in elevater shafts and some areas. i can only imagine the chaos on moving patients down 9 flights in the dark, with flashlights only,, while bagging them, critical drips, equipment/beds weighing 100s pounds. i anticipate reading accounta of employees there that night.
    According to local NYC news reports they used sleds to bring patients down the stairs, beds would not have fit the doorways/stairs and would have been nearly impossible to carry down several flights of stairs.

    Once on the ground floor patients were loaded onto stretchers from waiting ambulances.

    We should learn more about NYU later on, lord knows every local news station has had an reporter on sight harassing (ok, interviewing/reporting) whatever staff they could grab. Dr. John Lapok (sp?) was on last time one looked (cannot remember why he was down there, IIRC he said he was up at NYP and came down to "help"), but he praised the "doctors, interns, residents... everyone rolled up their sleeves to help". Have yet to hear one news report nor the doctor mention nursing staff.
  10. by   Sinman
    These are all tough choices and none of us will know until we are in the position which choice we will make. In my opinion the duties of mother outweigh the duties of nurse. I am extremely blessed in the fact that my husband is a stay at home dad for our children. However in you situation I would definitely stay home.
  11. by   T-Bird78
    My husband is 46, has been working in his industry for 25+ years, and our baby is 46, so just because OP has 20 years experience doesn't mean her kids are teenagers. Family may not be available to watch her kids, especially for 24 hours or longer, and not everybody is comfortable leaving their kids with family for various reasons. My question is this: if you get "the call" do you HAVE to go in, or just if able?
  12. by   hecallsmeDuchess
    @OP, I think family always comes first. In your case, I would not feel regret especially as your husband is out there doing his bit to help in this storm. If you went in and God forbid something happened that affected both of you, do you think the hospital will take care of your child's future?


    To some saying make plans, leave children with family, etc. Not everyone has family nearby and what person would want to be babysitting others' kids in such an emergency. If something happened, do you believe the sitter would make your child(ren) their priority and make sure they are safe? I hope we all get through this storm and its aftermath without loss to our lives, limbs or jobs.
  13. by   rngolfer53
    Certainly, one's family is going to take priority over work. However, as some have pointed out, this storm came with a lot of warning....and nursing is a profession that requires someone to care for patients 24/7. They are more helpless and at risk than we are.

    Natural disasters are a "known unknown." We all realize they're going to happen, but we don't know when they'll strike. It makes sense to plan ahead.

    A smart employer would provide for a safe, supervised place for kids to stay when parents are working and there's no one else in town to care for them. We are, after all, a mobile society.

    (As an aside, I find it strange that there are so many more business schools, but evidently so few good managers.......that doesn't say much for the MBA profs, does it? I started working in the good ole boy days of "paternalistic" oil and gas men. Often up from the ranks with not much in the way of college degrees. I'm not suggesting we go back there, but if you showed loyalty to them, they generally returned it in kind.)

    The one thing I've missed, and I haven't read every post top to bottom, but when ever someone calls out in these situations, all we really accomplish is shifting the burden to the people already there....who of course may have their own families in need. Just something to think about........

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