Future Shortage in Bedside Nurses - page 2

I have been an RN for 22 years. In recent years, we all know that the trend has been for acute inpatient facilities to try to hire BSN nurses as much as possible. However, another trend that I am... Read More

  1. Visit  amoLucia profile page
    8
    I believe there's soon to be a glut of MSN nurses out there, but not enough positions to be filled at the level of higher practice that they all wish to achieve. So a lot of unhappy and disappointed Master's nurses will then be in need of some type of employment.

    And then you'll hear their complaint that they 'have to settle and go back to the bedside' while they keep searching. (Much like a lot of current grads bemoan that they 'have to settle and apply to LTC'.) But guess what? All those bedside positions are being filled by newly created positions for UAPs and other specialty staff (as discussed in the current post on AN now about 'de-skilling' in nursing).

    Then what??? A rush to doctoral programs?
  2. Visit  Esme12 profile page
    2
    Quote from 33762FL
    I graduated with a diploma/AS in 2011 but had a previous unrelated college degree. I've been in med-surg since I graduated and I have no plans of changing that any time in the near future. I may want to go into a specialty (but still direct patient care) like endoscopy in the future, but would still want to work med-surg per diem. I'm working on my BSN and will finish in 6 months, but I have no desire to go into management. I am only getting the BSN because it will give me more options of what facilities will hire me as a bedside nurse or for a specialty in addition to med-surg.
    I don't mean to hijack the thread but I am curious.........

    What do you mean....diploma/ASN? I have seen this like this recently, a diploma grad has not gone to college and an ASN grad has an Associate degree which is still a college degree.
    lindarn and JZ_RN like this.
  3. Visit  Esme12 profile page
    0
    Quote from amoLucia
    I believe there's soon to be a glut of MSN nurses out there, but not enough positions to be filled at the level of higher practice that they all wish to achieve. So a lot of unhappy and disappointed Master's nurses will then be in need of some type of employment.

    And then you'll hear their complaint that they 'have to settle and go back to the bedside' while they keep searching. (Much like a lot of current grads bemoan that they 'have to settle and apply to LTC'.) But guess what? All those bedside positions are being filled by newly created positions for UAPs and other specialty staff (as discussed in the current post on AN now about 'de-skilling' in nursing).

    Then what??? A rush to doctoral programs?
    Yup.......
  4. Visit  Esme12 profile page
    3
    Quote from westieluv
    That's what I've noticed too, that everyone seems to be going back to school for their MSN. I can't think of a single nurse with their MSN who works on the floor either. I mean, yes, floor nursing is stressful, grueling work a lot of the time, but someone has to do it, and with the baby boomers just now getting into their sixties and seventies, the need is going to be greater than ever as they continue to age and have the normal health problems that go along with it.

    I didn't mean to imply that all BSN nurses want to move on, and I'm glad that you are happy being a floor nurse. It's just that the majority of new, young nurses that I know seem to have no intention whatsoever to make a career of doing bedside care, and it makes me wonder what this, combined with the ever increasing stipulations of Medicare will mean for the future of nursing care. Presumably, wages would go up due to an increased need, but with lower compensation and more expensive regulations, can wages go up enough to meet the need?
    They all want that $100,000 a year paycheck but when the market gets saturated the salaries will drop.
    susu24, lindarn, and Szasz_is_Right like this.
  5. Visit  subee profile page
    5
    If bedside nurses had to take organic chemistry there wouldn't be any bedside nurses. You don't need organic chem for BSN. If working conditions were better, BSN's would stay at the bedside. All these new grads who want to go for advanced degrees don't know enough to see the unexpected coming up to slap them in the face. Young dreams have a habit of getting put on the back burner when it comes to raising kids, borrowing money, etc.
    11RN, calivianya, Not_A_Hat_Person, and 2 others like this.
  6. Visit  JZ_RN profile page
    15
    Until the work conditions and nurse/patient ratios improve, nurses will continue to leave bedside nursing.
    calivianya, prettymica, silenced, and 12 others like this.
  7. Visit  rita359 profile page
    6
    As I observe all the new nurses coming into my hospital I don't see a lot of them staying at the bedside. A lot of student nurses are planning bsn only as stepping stone for another specialty such as np. It is sad to say that after I retire and need health care a lot of the nurses who would be caring for me would only be there, not for the love of it, but because they hadn't yet moved on.
    anotherone, Ruby Vee, Lovely_RN, and 3 others like this.
  8. Visit  joanna73 profile page
    15
    If working conditions improve, more nurses would continue bedside nursing. I enjoy bedside nursing and direct patient care. What I don't enjoy is overtime, missing breaks, and a general lack of staff, which is unsafe. Unless things improve, I don't see myself staying at the bedside. Many nurses leave the bedside for these exact reasons. We didn't create the system.
    11RN, prettymica, silenced, and 12 others like this.
  9. Visit  Good Morning, Gil profile page
    6
    Yes, there are some non-ideal things about working at the bedside, but I do enjoy working in critical care. What I don't find enjoyable is how drained I feel on my days off from lack of sleep, and this is due to working night shift. I have tried everything, and no matter how exhausted I am, I cannot sleep at night on my days off and oftentimes can't sleep for more than 3-4 hours at a time, only to wake up tired, but not tired enough to sleep. Have tried every kind of sleep schedule. Only been doing this for 2 years, and my sleep has only become more haphazard the longer I have been working. I do have a solution to this problem, which is to remove just 1 shift per pay period, which would make a world of difference, but can't afford to do that quite yet.

    I think many people stay at the bedside because the pay is better than in non-acute nursing areas (without an advanced degree), not because they desire to be there (from what I have heard people saying). I used to think I wanted to be a family NP, but since I already have a previous non-nursing bachelor's degree, I probably won't go back to school for a while, though I'm sure that I will go back to school at some point. If nursing were my first degree, though, and didn't plan on starting a family in the near future (I'm in my upper 20's) I'd be filling out NP school apps without hesitation.
    prettymica, rnfostermom, TheSquire, and 3 others like this.
  10. Visit  tenjuna profile page
    4
    I want to be a nurse so that I can make a difference in people's lives...I cannot do that behind a desk.

    besides, I am changing careers because I sat behind a desk for 23+ years. no way in beelzebub I want to do that again.
    LPNnowRN, rnfostermom, lindarn, and 1 other like this.
  11. Visit  Despareux profile page
    4
    I like bed-side nursing and I am also interested in what NP's do. Now if only I could combine my RN responsibilities with NP responsibilities--that would be the perfect career for me. I've daydreamed about opening up a wellness clinic where basic care is provided, along with education for the patient and their families that promotes wellness continuum.
    prettymica, mznelly, RNenthusiast, and 1 other like this.
  12. Visit  BrandonLPN profile page
    2
    Quote from classicdame
    wanting and getting are two different things. There are not enough management jobs for everyone.
    .

    "management" doesn't always have to mean a desk job or an administrative role. It could mean a BSN who leads a nursing team in the delivery of care for an assigned group of patients (think team nursing). This is still a bedside role, but one that really utilizes the higher education of a BSN.
    prettymica and tnmarie like this.
  13. Visit  RNRAC profile page
    3
    I dont know...I have my BSN. I got my BSN because where I live its the easiest way to get a job. But to be honest, I dont really think I want to go back to grad school any time in the forseeable future. I've always loved the bedside part of nursing. I dont know what will happen in 20 years from now...but right now I see myself loving bedside nursing forever And I think lots of people in my graduating class feel that way.
    tnmarie, lindarn, and nursel56 like this.


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