Why do so many nurses from the Philippines come to Canada/USA? - page 11

by lilaclover

27,197 Views | 123 Comments

I hope nobody takes offense to this question because I certainly don't mean it in any negative way. I am just wondering why so many nurses from the Philippines are coming to Canada and the USA? I always thought the... Read More


  1. 0
    Quote from juan de la cruz
    My opinion still stands that this statement is completely false. Why? because...

    1. I read the posts from people who are posting in the Philippines on allnurses including yours.
    2. I work with immigrant Filipino nurses in the US as well as people from other national origins so I have a point of comparison.
    3. I am originally from the Philippines myself and my English made a complete 360 degree turn for the better from the 16 years I've spent in the US. Some Filipinos who have been here longer hasn't gotten any better, I'm afraid.

    ...and lastly, just for kicks and giggles, 4. watch the last Miss Universe show (your contestant totally bombed the interview portion).

    You don't have to agree with me.
    Haven't watch it sadly.

    You are merely looking at the flaws of the subject. If you'll look at the Filipinos in general and not just as individual persons (which what you might have probably done) you'll end up agreeing with me.

    BTW I see no other forum cluster here with non-native English speakers as members. If I see Japanese Nursing Forums here or Korean Nursing Forum I might just change my mind. But on second thought I probably won't because it's strictly English here in allnurses.
  2. 0
    Quote from nursel56
    How would that affect our nursing care or be a basis for comparing the training we get compared to other countries?
    I was answering juan's question

    "Huh? where did you get the idea that nurses in "America" worry if their patient can pay or not?"

    Please read again carefully. And my answer to that question is on my previous post.

    Quote from nursel56
    I really have to ask, why you are taking the time to justify an opinion when you already know you don't have nearly enough facts at hand to offer a meaningful reply.
    Errr...I stated enough facts for a meaningful reply didn't I?
  3. 0
    Quote from nursel56
    Normally this refers to access and cost of the healthcare system, not the care one receives as a patient once in the system. If you only look at that I believe you will find that many people from countries with nationalized single payer healthcare plans will come to the US for treatment at great cost and upheaval in their lives.
    There's a think called medical tourism in South East Asia where people from industrialized nation with no free healthcare travel to Asian countries to get healthcare at a lower cost.

    US Medical Tourism Association magazine reported that medical tourism in the Philippines grew 8.0% in 2007. And that's just PH other countries promote medical tourism as well.
  4. 0
    --Out of Topic--

    to Kuya Juan Dela Cruz and all my fellow Filipino nurses out there in the United States- take care po.. I've heard from the news that there's a "SUPER BUG" in California, an antibiotic resistant bacteria if I'm not mistaken, that still has no drug yet. Take care of yourselves. God Bless
  5. 3
    Quote from lactamase
    You consume resources when giving care to a patient right? Unless you don't, it matters when giving care to a patient. As much as I would love but I can't give free medications to a patient who can't pay and is not insured. Don't think of me as a cold-hearted nurse but thats reality in PH. Some people can't get treated because they can't pay. Some don't even consider getting a surgery because it cost a lot.
    If you had read my prior posts carefully you would not have written this. Please take the time to inform yourself better before offering responses that respectfully -- don't make much sense. The billing of patients or what they can or cannot afford is out of our hands (nurses) completely.

    It sounds like you think a patient in the hospital receives services like an a la carte restaurant or something. Do you think we ask people if they can pay for their 9pm antibiotic or they aren't going to get it? Maybe you think they can only afford one meal a day? Your conceptualization of US healthcare is so incomplete it's confusing to even figure out what you are trying to say.
    juan de la cruz, Fiona59, and elkpark like this.
  6. 3
    Quote from jenmesh
    this topic gave me a lot of insight. i understand lactamase's concern. i live here in the philippines, and it's true that we don't see that hardships that westerners also face.

    it's been said before as i was reading back on the previous posts. nurses is an honorable job. you save the lives of people.. they depend on you. however, i believe and observed, here in the philippines, nurses are not respected. the government does not support nurses very well. they don't advocate for our rights considering our role in society. we are paid below minimum wage. we don't have nursing assistants, lpn's or whatsoever. nurses do everything here. wonderful, right? aside from that, sometimes nurses work double shifts because they have no replacements, and there are no relievers. no one complains, experience is needed.

    go to the us or canada, omg. nurses are respected and well paid. they understand the importance of nurses. yes, decades ago, they needed nurses, and of course, we came there to work with great pay with benefits, flexible working hours, and what's that? we have assistants? and we instruct them what to do? it's heaven. that is why a lot of filipinos are nurses, either coerced by their family because of the great opportunities abroad, or simply because they like that job.

    uhm, lpns, believe it or not are nurses. in my province, nobody delegates to me other than the charge nurse, who also delegates to the rns.

    what you need to understand there are differences in the scope of practice for nurses all over the world. i routinely give morphine. a nurse from northern ireland, told me she had never given morphine in her career because that was a resident's job. nurses from the phillipines that were hired by my hospital system, told me they had never removed suture or staples or even fitted an ostomy device because that was the doctor's job. other nurses from the phillipines claimed that they didn't have to do am and hs care in the hospital because that was the family's job.

    we only go on what we are told.

    but trust me nursing is not the golden ticket.
  7. 3
    Quote from lactamase
    Haven't watch it sadly.

    You are merely looking at the flaws of the subject. If you'll look at the Filipinos in general and not just as individual persons (which what you might have probably done) you'll end up agreeing with me.

    BTW I see no other forum cluster here with non-native English speakers as members. If I see Japanese Nursing Forums here or Korean Nursing Forum I might just change my mind. But on second thought I probably won't because it's strictly English here in allnurses.
    Ugh, you totally didn't get my punchline! You need to brush up on American English, brother. When someone says "for kicks and giggles" that means a funny remark not to be taken in serious light. I don't watch Miss Universe either but I know a lot of Filipinos do, it's a national pasttime. But I did see the clip on YouTube when a coworker showed it to me - the poor girl's answer to the question was disappointing to say the least but it's good entertainment if you have time to spare online.

    While the na´vetÚ you are making painfully obvious in your posts are beginning to get in my nerves, I'm going to be civil about this and tell you again: You admit you've only had interactions, online or otherwise, with Filipinos and that's how you made your judgement that how they speak English is among the best among non-native English speakers. Well, America is truly a melting pot of various races and I've had the privilege to work alongside Indians, Lebanese, Iraqi, Nigerian, Persian, Korean, Chinese, Japanese, German, Thai, Vietnamese, French, and numerous other non-native English speakers and I assure you, their English is just as good if not better than the Filipinos I've worked with. People are individuals, like you said. The only thing different with these other nationalities is that unlike Filipinos, they don't resort to shameless self promotion by saying their English is among the world's best among non-native English speakers.
    Last edit by juan de la cruz on Apr 11, '11
    elkpark, nursel56, and Fiona59 like this.
  8. 3
    Quote from Iamnars
    --Out of Topic--

    to Kuya Juan Dela Cruz and all my fellow Filipino nurses out there in the United States- take care po.. I've heard from the news that there's a "SUPER BUG" in California, an antibiotic resistant bacteria if I'm not mistaken, that still has no drug yet. Take care of yourselves. God Bless
    Kuya Juan? awww, that sent warm fuzzies all the way down to my toes. Thanks for the concern. Best of luck to you.

    P.S. for those who don't know..."kuya" is the Tagalog word for older brother.
    Fiona59, Iamnars, and nursel56 like this.
  9. 4
    Quote from lactamase
    You consume resources when giving care to a patient right? Unless you don't, it matters when giving care to a patient. As much as I would love but I can't give free medications to a patient who can't pay and is not insured. Don't think of me as a cold-hearted nurse but thats reality in PH. Some people can't get treated because they can't pay. Some don't even consider getting a surgery because it cost a lot.
    You know you're talking about your situation in the Philippines, right? Because, there's no way in hell that the scenario you just described will happen in the USA. What you described is blatantly unethical and only seen in countries where substandard care is allowed. The uninsured show up in US hospitals all the time. They are admitted to the same room, use the same linens, are fed the same hospital food, are given the same medications and treatments, and yes, are assigned the same physicians and nurses as those who have the ability to pay. As my other wise colleagues have stated, nurses aren't even privy to a patient's financial situation. The hospitals end up taking a revenue loss on these patients when they are unable to pay.

    I'm really flabbergasted by your comment. This is exactly what I see as a potential problem with bringing nurses from countries like the Philippines who are like you. You have to know how our health care works here and you can not bring any preconceived notion that you have from a third world country and think that you can practice the same way here. No way Jose. It's been years since I left the Philippines but honestly, I don't recall having the same air of arrogance when I was young.
    Ginger's Mom, Fiona59, elkpark, and 1 other like this.
  10. 3
    Quote from lactamase
    There's a think called medical tourism in South East Asia where people from industrialized nation with no free healthcare travel to Asian countries to get healthcare at a lower cost.

    US Medical Tourism Association magazine reported that medical tourism in the Philippines grew 8.0% in 2007. And that's just PH other countries promote medical tourism as well.
    Then there you go, you can be part of that in the Philippines. There's no need for you to apply for work overseas right? Please, pretty please.
    Ginger's Mom, Fiona59, and elkpark like this.


Top