RPNs/LPNs vs. RNs - page 6

by rant 11,088 Views | 55 Comments

I know this has probably been discussed a fair amount on this forum, but as a RPN/LPN that is currently bridging to become a RN, I wanted to share my experiences, questions, and conclusions about the inherent differences between... Read More


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    I'm a rn with higher national dip in mental health nursing and want to upgrade to bsn. Is there anybody or organization who can offer financial assistance to me.
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    Quote from matiiri
    I'm a rn with higher national dip in mental health nursing and want to upgrade to bsn. Is there anybody or organization who can offer financial assistance to me.
    About the only source of funding I can think of is the scholarship/bursary system administered by the Colleges of Registered Nurses in many of the provinces. Check with the schools where you think you might do your classes and see what kind of financial aid they offer.
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    If you are registered to work in Ontario, the RNAO offers up to $1500 in reimbursement for tuition, though its not guaranteed funding, and you need to apply.
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    As some of the other posts have mentioned I would suggest that you finish your studies first and get some experience under your belt before jumping to any kind of conclusions.I have been working as an RN for over 30 years and I can say without a doubt that it would be a huge mistake to take all nurses under the same umbrella without acknowledging the differences in education levels and skills. Currently in the work force we have some RPNs whose formal education is only a year or less and who have received additional skills training from the hospitals where they work. These training sessions are not scutinized in the same way as education from colleges and with the hospitals interest being in cost effectiveness ,pumping out RPNs with added skills is the main goal. My experience with working with RPNs through the years has demonstrated an enormous variance in knowledge base . As for the newly graduated RPNs who think that they are equivalent to RNs , think again .I have noticed that they lack signifiqantly in their ability to do critical thinking ,although they can perform more skills they don't always know the rational for what they do ,so they function more as technicians.There are some stars amongst the RPNs who should pursue getting their RN. However to group all nurses under the same category would be deceptive and down right dangerous to the public
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    Quote from Nursing forever
    <snip> Currently in the work force we have some RPNs whose formal education is only a year or less and who have received additional skills training from the hospitals where they work. These training sessions are not scutinized in the same way as education from colleges and with the hospitals interest being in cost effectiveness ,pumping out RPNs with added skills is the main goal.
    You fail to mention that those certificate RPNs who graduated prior to 2005 and received additional skills training to advance them at par with the diploma RPNs also have many years of bedside experience, and in some cases 20+ years of clinical experience. To ignore this importance is quite irresponsible, if your attempt is to be objective (which I doubt.)

    The additional training was most certainly scrutinized the same way as College programs are, do you think they just pulled the upgrading requirements out of a hat? Hospitals would consult with their respective accredited colleges and provincial regulatory body when determining curriculum.
    Quote from Nursing forever
    My experience with working with RPNs through the years has demonstrated an enormous variance in knowledge base . As for the newly graduated RPNs who think that they are equivalent to RNs , think again .I have noticed that they lack signifiqantly in their ability to do critical thinking ,although they can perform more skills they don't always know the rational for what they do ,so they function more as technicians.
    Funny, I've felt the same way about some RNs I've worked with. Some BScN grads who require a bit too much hand-holding and also some "seasoned" RNs who are so skill focused they are unable to initiate any evidence-based decision making. Good thing there's a variety of different nursing staff on board to figure stuff out.
    Quote from Nursing forever
    There are some stars amongst the RPNs who should pursue getting their RN.
    This remark is a cheap shot. So you're suggesting the "star" RPNs should not be satisfied with their role in the health care field but rather become RNs because that is the expectation to be a good nurse? There are many exceptional RPNs who feel quite fulfilled and accomplished in their roles and have no desire whatsoever to be an RN. To presume otherwise is tactless and arrogant.
    Fiona59 likes this.
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    Oh, Ottawa, I hear ya.

    Makes me wonder if "Nursing Forever" is a member of CARNA. CARNA has just launched it's semi-yearly assault on the public. They think the RN is the ONLY way to nurse and out here have been publically called on it by both the colleges governing the PNs and the Reg. Psych Nurses.

    Forever's post just doesn't understand that bridging from PN to RN is not that easy is the majority of provinces. It also fails to acknowledge that there are good, bad, and medicore nurses produced by every nursing programme and they are found in every hospital.

    My manager always says she'd rather have four experienced LPNs than four new grad RNs on the floor because experience counts


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