The Cynical Nurse Speaks - page 2

by VivaLasViejas 9,589 Views | 24 Comments Guide

Not to put too fine a point on things, but......sometimes, nursing really bites. It bites when you've built a life and a reputation on what you can do with a stethoscope and a nose for the subtlest signs of trouble, and some... Read More


  1. 5
    Well its laugh or go mad VivaLasViejas.

    I'm an over achiever so I choose both!
  2. 4
    I'm with you on that one, echo......also got a kick out of your line about owning your psychosis Things were so bad one day last week that when swing shift was coming in, I threw my arms out in front of them and invited them to "join the IN-SA-NI-TAAAAAAAAAAAY!!" They all looked at me as if I'd suddenly sprouted three heads.....and I didn't even miss a beat. I guess I own my psychosis too.
  3. 5
    I agree with you wholeheartedly, nursing is bad for your health physically and emotionally and I too feel the need for meds to deal with the stress and frustration that is nursing today. My Dr thinks I should just be able to shake it off, take a walk, give me a break! I know the feeling of wanting to walk out the door in the middle of the shift, when I'm shaking with anger and frustration about my ridiculous assignment that is just everyday nursing! I truthfully think without medication many nurses will end up with physical problems like htn and CAD from the stress that leads to anxiety and depression from the unreasonable working conditions in hospitals and nursing homes. For all those who think that being stressed, anxious and depressed is a sign of weakness and tough it out I would only mention that this will almost inevitably lead to "real" health problems! All those stress hormones are negatively affecting our health whether we realize it or not!

    I get along well with my immediate supervisors and manager, but still know I am easily replaceable. I have no illusions about the "corp" healthcare system! I'm just saving my money, paying off the mortgage and hoping somehow I'll make it to retirement, hopefully early retirement. Some people say go back to school be an NP, but I just feel it's not worth the time and debt and in the end it will still be just another version of the healthcare rat race. I'm hoping when I get the mortgage paid off I can change fields and work part-time in a pleasant and less stressful job. I'd gladly go back to the "boring" secretarial jobs I used to do if I could only live on the pay because nursing is hell on your health and peace of mind!
    Lovely_RN, jrbl77, tnmarie, and 2 others like this.
  4. 0
    Oh, come on, why is it any of your business what anyone names her baby? If you're that stressed out, you could stop worrying about things that have nothing to do with your job. (Er, somehow I missed the lighthearted tone of this piece on my first read-through. I guess I'm so used to people complaining about stuff on this board that I just assumed it was another entitled rant. Carry on!)
    Last edit by BonnieSc on Oct 25, '12 : Reason: edit
  5. 3
    We see the world as we are. It is just but a reflection of our own interior landscape.



    I thought the post was really funny. As regards babies names my favourite came from the Freakonomics book where the women called her child Shyte Hed thinking it was the spelling for Jiad,.

    And yes Wendy,these posts generally can be lean towards complaints. I guess were quite similar to pts in that respect- We seldom write when its wonderful but a complaint......ah...that lights our fire!
    teeniebert, tnmarie, and VivaLasViejas like this.
  6. 4
    It would, seriously, be more enjoyable if nurse-to-patient ratios were better.
    I had the joy of having only four patients last week and I was not sitting on my tookus.
    There is always something to do, but I was able to make it come together much much nicer and be very much more thorough than when I have eight!
    The care I gave had a greater quality and (though still busy) I was less stressed, better focused.
    They say you get what you pay for, well if hospital want superior performance quality, they need to pay for it and that may mean just one extra nurse per shift.
    I know there has to be money for it somewhere...

    And, Viva, you had a few random vents in your original post, so here are some of mine.
    Ahem...

    RRC: I am not hiding a bed on you... chillax, will ya? I also don't know when Patient X will be discharged, yet because Patient X's nursing home is having a hard time themselves and I am working with them... chillax, will ya?
    Oh... and don't flippin' call me to ask me what the name of my new patient's PCP is because you forgot to note it... I am crazy busy with really important stuff and because you are too lazy to look up up yourself (so call the nurse!) I'm in no hurry. I have the phone on hold and when I'm done writing a page of orders, I'll look it up for you.

    Housekeeping: I am not making more work for you. I'm sorry (more than you realize) that Patient Z crapped all over the carpet. I don't have the access, the time nor the desire to do your job to shampoo the carpet... and yes it does too need to be shampooed. Don't argue with me. In fact, I would do it myself but I do my job, now please come do yours!

    Myself: Eating brownies and strong coffee first thing in the morning is a bad bad plan of action. Don't do that to yourself again, Hygiene. There is not enough time, toilet paper or magazines to do that.

    Phew!
  7. 1
    A serious question now for the experienced, season crowd who posted these very amusing comments on this thread:

    I'm 47 starting out in nursing. I am already not in the greatest of health... Bad back, newly discovered bilateral shoulder pain, huge gap in abdominal muscles (thanks to five lovely babies!) and one very mysterious ailment of my left foot not to mention the Wii machine tells me "That's obese" when I bother to step on it to get weighed...so now the question:

    does someone like me stand a shot in *&!@ if physically surviving working on a hospital unit?

    I've already been doing LTC. I am realizing I have to pick my battles with whom I toilet and when I need to hunt down the lift (that is until yesterday when I got canned! See my other post-"Wrote up CNA, but I got the boot").

    Could you all help me out by giving some insight or rating into which kinds of nursing are the most physically demanding so I can hopefully navigate towards a channel of nursing I will be able to physically survive. Much appreciated!
    VivaLasViejas likes this.
  8. 1
    Quote from VivaLasViejas
    I'm with you on that one, echo......also got a kick out of your line about owning your psychosis Things were so bad one day last week that when swing shift was coming in, I threw my arms out in front of them and invited them to "join the IN-SA-NI-TAAAAAAAAAAAY!!" They all looked at me as if I'd suddenly sprouted three heads.....and I didn't even miss a beat. I guess I own my psychosis too.
    Oh yes, I feel like doing this too. When I see the night shift come, I nearly want to hug and kiss them. I get them a nice comfy chair for report and tell them all about the woes of my day. Then, they do the same to me when I come in.
    Sometimes I really do feel like releasing wild monkeys on the unit.
    VivaLasViejas likes this.
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    Oh, I just recalled my personal favorite. (How could I forget ). Thankyou , to the thoughtful patients who leads me to the bathroom pointing proudly to their stool specimen floating in the toilet. To you I say." Gee thanks Mr. X . Let me just whip out my fish net that I keep right here in my pocket ! "
  10. 1
    Hahahahaha! You are a good egg too. I really enjoy reading your posts.
    VivaLasViejas likes this.


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