Is all nursing experience equal?

  1. 1
    I hope I'm posting this thread in the right place...

    I am a new grad from the Bay Area. I have put in over 30 job applications: Northern CA, Southern CA, Idaho, Minnesota, Washington, and Arkansas. I have been offered a job in Arkansas on an inpatient Oncology Unit. Granted, I have family there, which would ease the transition tremendously, but my family (the part that lives here in CA) has grave concerns about this being a potential issue in the future, so now I'm wondering if, after a year or two, I decide that I want to try and move back to CA, will experience as an RN in AR hinder, or help me? What do you think?
    Joe V likes this.
  2. 11 Comments so far...

  3. 2
    Quote from lf1158
    I hope I'm posting this thread in the right place...

    I am a new grad from the Bay Area. I have put in over 30 job applications: Northern CA, Southern CA, Idaho, Minnesota, Washington, and Arkansas. I have been offered a job in Arkansas on an inpatient Oncology Unit. Granted, I have family there, which would ease the transition tremendously, but my family (the part that lives here in CA) has grave concerns about this being a potential issue in the future, so now I'm wondering if, after a year or two, I decide that I want to try and move back to CA, will experience as an RN in AR hinder, or help me? What do you think?
    *** No, not all nursing experience is equal. However nursing experience obtained in an acute care hospital working in oncology would be considered very valuable when yoyu search for another inpatient oncology position. It won't matter that your experience was obtained in Arkansas when you apply for a position in Calfiornia.
    SE_BSN_RN and Tiffanybaybay like this.
  4. 2
    ​i agree that an inpatient oncology job sounds like great experience. and some time away from your immediate family may be time well spent on your own growth and independence. go for it!
    SE_BSN_RN and SHGR like this.
  5. 3
    Does your family think that cancer is different in Arkansas than California? My headphones bear a warning that they contain a substance that is known to cause cancer in the state of California.

    Ah, no. Take the AR job. It is a beautiful state and I've found that the people there are really nice.
    SE_BSN_RN, Tiffanybaybay, and PMFB-RN like this.
  6. 1
    It's inpatient hospital experience that matters. If it's a good sized unit and the training is decent, you will have no trouble finding a job wherever you move to. I would say that if you were being offered a group home environment, or a long term care unit it might definitely be hard to relocate back to California, but a hospital setting will be VERY beneficial.
    SE_BSN_RN likes this.
  7. 1
    I think that is a great opportunity for you to hone your nursing skills and to grow in your career.
    SE_BSN_RN likes this.
  8. 0
    Thanks for the feedback, everyone! I am also of the opinion that as long as it's inpatient nursing, it's valuable experience. I just needed some unbiased input on the situation Going to go check out the hospital in person (offered the job after a telephone interview) and get a feel for the unit before signing on the dotted line. Any big ticket questions or things I should take note of while I am there that you seasoned nurses know tend to play a role in the atmosphere / functioning of inpatient units?
  9. 3
    Quote from lf1158
    thanks for the feedback, everyone! i am also of the opinion that as long as it's inpatient nursing, it's valuable experience. i just needed some unbiased input on the situation going to go check out the hospital in person (offered the job after a telephone interview) and get a feel for the unit before signing on the dotted line. any big ticket questions or things i should take note of while i am there that you seasoned nurses know tend to play a role in the atmosphere / functioning of inpatient units?

    take note of whether there seem to be adequate supplies and staffing. is it controlled chaos or just chaotic? if you see a lot of "old" nurses there, that's a good sign. conversely, if most of the nurses you meet are in their early 20s, it means there's a lot of turnover. that can be ok, but make sure you ask several people why the turnover. (it could be just that they've opened a new oncology unit/split their old one, or it could be that the atmosphere is toxic and no one wants to stay.) ask about the orientation process and about whether you'll have a single preceptor (or rotate between two or three) or whether they just throw you with whomever on a day to day basis. the more organization in their orientation process the better.

    look for little signs that the nursing staff is valued. is there a break room? is it big enough to sit and eat your lunch? is there a bulletion board or poster or some such celebrating nursing? has it been there for 10 years? if you can, shadow for half a day. are nurses empowered to speak up during rounds and are they heeded? do they seem knowledgable? how are assignments made? what does your gut tell you?

    good luck!
    SE_BSN_RN, TiddlDwink, and SHGR like this.
  10. 0
    Stay in CA, the pay here is the highest in the country. Soon jobs will open up bc of the new healthcare plan, there will be a huge demand for RNs, a lot will retire soon. The jobs are out there just keep with it. Although on the down side Hospitals are looking for experienced RNs bc of the high applications being put out there.
  11. 0
    To Ruby. I'm sure your one of them.


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